The facts the Amnesty fact finder didn’t find

Rosalie Kunoth-Monks told Q&A’s national audience on Monday: “We live in absolute poverty.”
Do they? At the very least the residents of Utopia have income support in the form of Centrelink benefits.
Does “we” include her and her family?
They have a three bedroom house with airconditioning, according to someone familiar with Utopia, 250 km north-east of Alice Springs.
That person spoke with us after watching Q&A and on the condition of not being named.
Others might be sleeping rough, but sometimes it’s a choice: it’s great for accessing the shop, a factor of transport rather than accommodation.
Sometimes camping rough is a necessity due to sorry business. No number of permanent housing will alleviate cultural expectations.  Some
people have access to housing on nearby outstations.
A local artist living on a truck was one of the exhibits when Salil Shetty, Secretary-General of Amnesty International, called in on his
one-day fact-finding mission.
But the artist’s house on his nearby homeland was a fact not found by Mr Shetty because he wasn’t made aware if it, our source suggests.
If he had, perhaps his finding would not have been that “around 500 homeland communities are being left to wither as the Government starves them of essential services”. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

Photo: Naronda William Loy, 21, with her daughter Karlishia Raggatt, 1, speak with Amnesty International’s Secretary General Salil Shetty, at Mosquito Bore, Utopia, 8 October 2011. Courtesy Amnesty International.