There are several questions, to my way of thinking: one …

Comment on Spot a tree? Chop it down! by Bob Durnan.

There are several questions, to my way of thinking: one is why trees were permitted to continue burning once they had caught fire, when at least sometimes the burning could have been caused to cease, with the likelihood that some of these trees could have been saved; but more importantly is why trees were permitted to catch fire in circumstances where, in at least some cases, this could have been prevented without too much trouble?
Why are many trees in the Todd and Charles beds still permitted to stand closely surrounded by densely packed, dry buffel and couch banks, in unnaturally dangerous conditions for the trees, without any attempts to remove the danger by cutting and removing these domineering introduced grasses?

Bob Durnan Also Commented

Spot a tree? Chop it down!
Thanks Rowan (Posted November 16, 2011 at 10:32 am), but if you’d read the earlier posts you would have seen that we already very clearly knew most of that.
My main complaint was about the tendency of some fire fighters, on at least some occasions, to stand watching fires spread to grass at the base of obviously vulnerable trees without taking action to arrest the flames before they engulf the trees.
They had plenty of water, had the opportunity to act without endangering themselves, the trees were close to where the fire engine and tanker were parked, but they chose not to act. When challenged one explained to me that if the fire bugs were going to light these fires, then why should fire fighters bother to try to save the trees?
Granted, the job is dangerous, often tedious and often thankless. Granted, that the activities of drunken firebugs are very frustrating.
But the point is, these are not the fire bugs’ trees, they are some of Alice Springs most precious assets, and where possible they should be protected.
I suspect that after this debate in the Alice Springs News, more efforts at protecting these trees will be made in the future.
Already the work that quite obviously should have occurred last winter (clearing the matted dry couch and thick clumps of buffel grass from around the bases of mature trees along the river banks between the Schwartz Crescent and Casino causeways) has finally been done, mainly by work gangs made up of prisoners, over the past few weeks.
Let’s hope that this work continues at regular intervals before the danger to these trees returns.


Spot a tree? Chop it down!
This awful planning by whomever at Larapinta camp is in keeping with the long trend in Alice: a war against natural shade and healthy vegetation by a variety of authorities, including some involved at the municipal council, as well as some at PAWA. Where the CBD once had many useful and beautiful shade trees in Bath, Hartley, Todd and other streets where people park cars, they have virtually all been eliminated by the treephobes in our midst. (A treephobe is one who has an unnatural fear of falling leaves and bark; they are so litter- and risk-averse that they would prefer that people living with forty-plus celsius temperatures should enjoy full sunshine on their vehicles rather than having to put up with kurrajong seeds or cedar berries pummelling their windscreens, or a bit of natural litter on the footpath. The treephobes also honour the ideal of fully concreted pavements, rather than risk the growth of a blade of grass or a seedling, or a bit of natural soakage for the root systems of any remaining trees that dare to attempt to survive in the urban wonderland. The continued existence of the wonderful arboreal giants on the Melanka block is probably currently causing them to suffer regular nightmares).
Alice residents would have observed also the recent wholesale eradication of mature trees and bushes in the car park opposite the YHA/old walk-in cinema, on the corner of Leichhardt Terrace and Parsons St, and the apparent decision by authorities to not try to save many trees that caught fire in the river bed over the last three months. On enquiring twice (in late August, early Sept) to fire crew members who were standing by and watching trees catch fire from dense buffel grass, as to why they weren’t attempting to douse these flames burning next to red gums before they inevitably set fire to the bark and dead wood on the trees, I was given to understand that since “they” were lighting all these fires, then it wasn’t the firefighters’ job to save the trees. It didn’t seem to occur to the firefighters that the trees are the collective heritage and wealth of all townspeople, and a major tourism asset, or that it was their job to protect this naturally occurring ‘property’ as well as constructed assets. (Having also reported some fire outbreaks to the police number in Darwin, and on occasion having been met with complete disinterest unless the fire was likely to affect constructed property, it is obvious that it’s not just some Alice firemen who don’t seem to think that the red gums are important to the wellbeing of Alice Springs. On one occasion my offer to supply a description of a person who had just lit a fire was also met with lack of any interest at the Darwin end of the phone).
Admittedly some of the elimination of the street trees was probably carried out by the treephobes under the cloak of a floral version of politically-correct xenophobia (get rid of the foreign-born vegetation with a bit of botanical ethnic cleansing), the fashion for this has now subsided to a significant extent, so it may be a good time for shade fanciers to speak up more about these civic crimes.
How about an anti-fascist shadey alliance to seek a presence on the next Town Council?


Recent Comments by Bob Durnan

Architect of Katherine’s masterplan to be Alice council CEO
James (Posted June 6, 2019 at 8:14 am): How many parks in Alice Springs commemorate Aboriginal leaders or dignitaries?
Nothing against Father Smith, but couldn’t we consider looking collectively at setting some priorities before rushing in to barrack for our favourite project?


Price family were sole complainants against Cocking & Satour 
Conservative (posted May 1, 2019 at 9:19 am): what do you mean by ‘props to Erwin’? Stage ‘props’? It doesn’t make sense.


Road toll drops by half
Like InterestedDarwinObserver, I think Assistant Commissioner Beer’s claim is a somewhat questionable one.
Given that the majority of NT road deaths are normally the result of single vehicle roll-overs on remote roads, it is questionable whether more intensive traffic policing in Alice would necessarily produce this good result as claimed.
We would need a much bigger sample and more details of the individual accidents to really get an idea about what is actually going on here.


Massive horse deaths now a risk to humans
Hal, (Posted April 14, 2019 at 1:29 am): Don’t be so disingenuous. It is obvious from the article that CLC staff have been trying very hard to get permission to act.
They have now made their frustrations known to the relevant authorities, who are able to step in.
My point is that your criticism should have been aimed at those responsible (the traditional owners in question), not at the CLC as an organisation, as the staff are trying to do their job and get something done about the situation.
I was at both Mulga Bore and Angula a little over a week ago, and found very few people at Mulga, and none at Angula.
There were no dead horses that I saw, or smell of dead horses, around the houses then at either place, but there may have been some elsewhere. Of course the carcasses should be disposed of, wherever they are; that is what the writer and the CLC are trying to achieve.


Massive horse deaths now a risk to humans
Hal: How would the Land Council stand legally if it were to destroy the property of a set of traditional owners without their permission? The CLC does not own the horses.
They are either the property of individual traditional owners and traditional owner family groups, or of persons who have contracts with the TOs to allow their horses to be on the TOs’ land.
Or else they are the responsibility of the particular Land Trust trustees on whose land they are located.
Legally the CLC as a statutory body can only consult and advise the traditional owners, and act on their instructions. It cannot make decisions for them without their permission.


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