Good to see these Commonwealth politicians having the guts to …

Comment on NT Government action on grog clearly not enough for Macklin by Bob Durnan.

Good to see these Commonwealth politicians having the guts to show some serious, thoughtful leadership on this issue. If these steps are allowed to proceed to fruition, then at last we might get a better balance between the individual’s freedom to drink alcohol in the NT, and the rights of us all to be reasonably safe from the harms caused by many consumers of alcohol. In particular, we could even see adequate respect for the rights of all children to receive proper care from sober parents and carers, not disrupted by alcohol-related harms, and a healthy start to their lives during their pre-birth, pre-school and school years.

Bob Durnan Also Commented

NT Government action on grog clearly not enough for Macklin
Re Tony @Posted November 29, 2011 at 9:52 am:
You’re right, it is a bit like living in kindergarten land: if you paid any attention to the details that have emerged in this important ongoing debate, you would be well aware that your statement claiming the “banning of 4 litre casks has done nothing except inconvenience the wider population” is absolutely incorrect.
The banning of the 4 litre casks has seen a sustained drop in overall sales of alcohol (close to a 20% drop since 2006), and this has massively improved things for the general public, because it has caused a drop in the average number of homicides, and a reduction in serious alcohol-related harms, emergency department attendances, expensive hospital procedures, and serious inter-personal violence and self-harms. Consequently the police and hospital are freed to take more care of the general public, as they have to spend less time clearing up the results of murders and serious assaults. Continued litter and public drinking problems are relatively small prices to pay compared to these public benefits.


Recent Comments by Bob Durnan

Architect of Katherine’s masterplan to be Alice council CEO
James (Posted June 6, 2019 at 8:14 am): How many parks in Alice Springs commemorate Aboriginal leaders or dignitaries?
Nothing against Father Smith, but couldn’t we consider looking collectively at setting some priorities before rushing in to barrack for our favourite project?


Price family were sole complainants against Cocking & Satour 
Conservative (posted May 1, 2019 at 9:19 am): what do you mean by ‘props to Erwin’? Stage ‘props’? It doesn’t make sense.


Road toll drops by half
Like InterestedDarwinObserver, I think Assistant Commissioner Beer’s claim is a somewhat questionable one.
Given that the majority of NT road deaths are normally the result of single vehicle roll-overs on remote roads, it is questionable whether more intensive traffic policing in Alice would necessarily produce this good result as claimed.
We would need a much bigger sample and more details of the individual accidents to really get an idea about what is actually going on here.


Massive horse deaths now a risk to humans
Hal, (Posted April 14, 2019 at 1:29 am): Don’t be so disingenuous. It is obvious from the article that CLC staff have been trying very hard to get permission to act.
They have now made their frustrations known to the relevant authorities, who are able to step in.
My point is that your criticism should have been aimed at those responsible (the traditional owners in question), not at the CLC as an organisation, as the staff are trying to do their job and get something done about the situation.
I was at both Mulga Bore and Angula a little over a week ago, and found very few people at Mulga, and none at Angula.
There were no dead horses that I saw, or smell of dead horses, around the houses then at either place, but there may have been some elsewhere. Of course the carcasses should be disposed of, wherever they are; that is what the writer and the CLC are trying to achieve.


Massive horse deaths now a risk to humans
Hal: How would the Land Council stand legally if it were to destroy the property of a set of traditional owners without their permission? The CLC does not own the horses.
They are either the property of individual traditional owners and traditional owner family groups, or of persons who have contracts with the TOs to allow their horses to be on the TOs’ land.
Or else they are the responsibility of the particular Land Trust trustees on whose land they are located.
Legally the CLC as a statutory body can only consult and advise the traditional owners, and act on their instructions. It cannot make decisions for them without their permission.


Be Sociable, Share!

A new way to support our journalism

We do not have a paywall. If you support our independent journalism you can make a financial contribution by clicking the red button below. This will help us cover expenses and sustain the news service we’ve been providing since 1994, in a locally owned and operated medium.

Erwin Chlanda, Editor