Thank you for providing the opportunity to read such a …

Comment on What’s working in Indigenous Affairs? A thirty year perspective. by Maya Cifali.

Thank you for providing the opportunity to read such a comprehensive, sensitive and sensible article on the situation on the ground in “Aboriginal Affairs”. The succession of policies and active interference by Governments or NGOs, churches of a range of denominations or community based Aboriginal organisations, all meant well but achieved so little. The story of the old lady is the wonderful example of self determination. After some 27 years of working life in Central Australia and the Katherine Region, I have reached a level of despair and disenchantment, and came to the conclusion that any changes in the circumstances of the Australian indigenous population must come from within. Whatever is offered or imposed from the outside will remain evasive and controversial.

Recent Comments by Maya Cifali

Boyer Lectures aim to reignite recognition debate
Happy and looking forward to Rachel’s perspective in her Boyer Lecture. It may open the way to big and better things.
I may recommend to Evelyn Roullet to refresh her understanding of “access and equity,” not to be confused with equality in access.
Nothing to do with apartheid which was segregation “by law” on the basis of race.
Aboriginal kids can go to any public or private school in Australia and, in addition, they can access special schools for their culturally sensitive curriculum.
Any non-Aboriginal kid may enrol at Yipirinya School if they wish, as much as any non Catholic kid may attend OLSH for the kind of education and values they may receive there.
And there is no Australian law prohibiting an Aboriginal person to enter into marriage with any other person since 1967 (with the addition of the same sex marriage amendment).
So much clarification and qualification is needed about the Uluru statement and the place of our first nations in our multicultural society.


Pine Gap: The link Alice has to Trump’s betrayal of the Kurds
And the question remains: How does the autocratic decision of a tyrant, to whom we offer for a pepper corn the use of a valuable facility some 20km out of town, will affect us in consideration of our long term alliance.
Listening to Craig, and deTocqueville, and Jefferson. It is the right, indeed the duty of us, the people, to provide new Guards for our future safety and happiness.
Here in OZ as much as in the US.


Big drops in grog crime, break-ins on way down: police
Why should the police (Cdr Currie) lie to us in his report to the Town Council.
Figures show a drop in crime. Good.
He did not say all is rosy! More to be done.
Rome was not built in a day.
Let’s support what seems to go in the right direction, and thank our police force for their efforts. I for one am not getting used to social mis-behaviour, but can see the small improvements in my area behind Northside IGA.


Ministers lash out at council over gallery
Thank you Hal for clearly saying what most of us are thinking.
Indeed there is a flaw in Ms Wakefield’s statement above (I quote: “We have continued to make every effort to work with the Alice Springs Town Council to identify a site within the CBD that will pave the way for the National Aboriginal Art Gallery.”)
Just delete “within the CBD” and then we shall all believe that “every effort” was made to find an appropriate site. The power of the word.


Council says ‘no’ to government gallery offer
A case in modern colonialism.
The early settlers had taken away the land. Today we, the town settlers, live in comfortable homes when the blekfela suffer housing overcrowding, mental heath issues and youth despair.
In the current dispute for the location of the now illusive NAAG, people in high places (whether red, blue or in between) insist on imposing the site of their choice for something belonging to Aboriginal people, therefore overriding ownership rights on art and culture for mere economical benefits.
The decision was made more than two years ago that whatever consultants or Arrernte stakeholders may say, the Alice Springs CBD is the place for “Aboriginal Art” to be shown to the world.
The pride and joy that Indigenous people may retrieve in displaying their ancient and modern art in a culturally appropriate site, is taken away by fear to lose face if they were to listen to the actual owners of that art. Another case of dispossession. Cry my country!


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