I remember back in the 80s when I was at …

Comment on Female tourists sleeping in car alleged to have been sexually assaulted: all three suspects now charged, rifle still not recovered. by Ray.

I remember back in the 80s when I was at the Sunshine Coast for a sporting event. It was school holidays and there were no vacancies in any of the motels that we could afford, so we decided to sleep in the car. We were woken by the police and told in no uncertain terms that we could not sleep in our car on the esplanade, and were promptly moved on.
Even two years ago when I was on the Gold Coast for holidays there are red and white signs everywhere stating that sleeping in public (even in your car) was illegal.
It still amazes me that here in Alice Springs it is tolerated (effectively permitted), in the river and in many of the crown land reserves around town.
It does not take a lot to spot them, the rising smoke from their campfire or ramshackle tents are a giveaway.
Where do they shower or go to the toilet? Why do we allow children to be brought up like this?
If there are not enough rangers, employ more, at a higher pay rate if necessary. Stagger their starting times, and back them up when they enforce the by-laws. To those who say it will just move the problem somewhere else, my response is, good, that means it is not here.

Ray Also Commented

Female tourists sleeping in car alleged to have been sexually assaulted: all three suspects now charged, rifle still not recovered.
@Russell “The savings to society, already evident in recidivist statistical data, includes health, policing, court and prison costs, leading to positive future benefits like full-time employment.”
Already evident?? No Russell, crime is so high the police commissioner has been asked by the CM to personally get involved and fix the problem. The Berrimah and Alice Springs prisons are at bursting point, and the number of juveniles in detention are staggering, (the next generation). You are of course right Russell when you question my beliefs when I say I don’t give a S#%t, I really do, but do you really think these habitual drunks care about going to jail or losing their licence? It’s not like they are worried about where their next pay cheque is coming from, or how they are going to pay rent. I asked an old Aboriginal chap recently “why do these kids think they can keep breaking the law?” and was told “they don’t give a f&ck about the your law, they’ll get caught and get to spend time with family”.
Remember the old days when if a kid got brought home by the local sergeant? He’d be more scared about the hiding he’d get from his dad. Nowadays, the father would drag the kid straight to a lawyer to defend him against that “horrible white racist copper bastard”.
Drinking is not the cause of this society, is it a symptom. Unless we look at making all people (ie all races / all Australians) obey the same set of laws that have been developed over centuries, for a civilised society, the next generation will suffer the same fate. We have seen the gently gently approach tried and failed over many many years. As I’ve said previously, I love the concept of social inclusion, but if people want respect and not resentment, they need to understand they have to take responsibility for themselves, and their children.
If you banned driving for one day every week, I am sure you would make a massive difference to the road toll, and you could make a valid point with those stats as well.
Thanks for the discussion though, it has been enjoyable.


Female tourists sleeping in car alleged to have been sexually assaulted: all three suspects now charged, rifle still not recovered.
@Russell. I get pretty sick and tired of being the one that has to make the sacrifice because of all the others who refuse to take responsibility for themselves. If they can’t abide by the rules of this society, go somewhere else. I see no reason I can’t enjoy the right to buy alcohol and drink it responsibly, like I can do in any similarly sized town in this country. All I ever hear from the huggers is that alcohol is evil, and we have to cut our consumption to help the poor unfortunates. I greatly don’t care any more if they drink themselves into a stupor or worse, if you can’t handle the grog, don’t drink! I’ve gotten blotto many times in my youth, and moderated my behaviour as I have grown up. It’s not that hard


Female tourists sleeping in car alleged to have been sexually assaulted: all three suspects now charged, rifle still not recovered.
@2 Rod, I ride through bushland near town regularly. The amount of crap that I see dumped in and around these areas is disgusting. Filthy blankets, often caked in dried blood and shit, surrounded by tins of food, drink containers etc all swarming with flies are becoming a blight on our town. This is occurring more and more regularly. I applaud the council workers for putting their health at risk and collecting this rubbish. I have never had any of my camping gear “stolen” or taken away, because it is all cleaned, and stored in my shed behind the house that I bought from working hard. I am part of the community I choose to live in, and accept that if I want to be a part of this community I will follow by the rules they have in place. If people choose to ignore those rules and it affects my ability to enjoy a lifestyle I should be able to expect, I expect them do be dealt with according to the law / rules.


Recent Comments by Ray

Gunner the statesman short on facts for Centre
Yet the grey nomads continue to flock over the border from SA into the NT.
Yes, they fill out a piece of paper promising to self isolate.
Problem is they do so in Darwin, where their holidays are booked.
Obviously they get there by stopping for fuel at Alice, Ti Tree, Aileron, Tennant, Three Ways, Katherine and all places in between.
Closing the borders should mean just that: If you do not live here, or you are not bringing in supplies, turn around at the border.
Until that is done, the other measures implemented on us a farcical. Treat your own rules seriously, then we might too.


Thief snatches fortnight’s money from age pensioner
Chris you are 100% correct. Your comment has nothing to do with why crime is like it is, you simply stated the obvious.
@ Teacher: Before you respond, best to actually understand what I wrote. I did not say that any teacher uses physical discipline these days. What I said is that it is a defence under the NT Criminal Code if they do, and the same Act further says that a teacher automatically has the right to do so unless it is expressly withheld by the person responsible for that child.
Despite having this defence available to them, the would most likely be dismissed as it is against the departments policy.
This relates directly to my original argument, where although the security guard is protected in law by using force in the defence of themselves or “others”, it is most likely a direct breach of his employers policy, which may earn him a handshake by the police, but would also see him fighting for, or out of, a job.
Been there done that!


Thief snatches fortnight’s money from age pensioner
@ Evelyne: Yes, a security guard can arrest anyone, in fact a normal citizen can arrest a person under similar circumstances, but usually it would not be a case of a person saying you are under arrest, they would instead hold them until the police arrived.
And yes, both can use force to protect themselves or others, however some of what Chris said is valid. It depends on the conditions the security guard has been employed under, i.e. it may be specified that they are there as a deterrent only. The ones in Yeppie and Coles would most likely have that drilled into them, deter and issue verbal instructions, but do not physically intervene.
They would also be trained in gathering relevant info to pass onto the police once they arrive.
This would have been done as a risk assessment of the likelihood of being held vicariously liable if sued, a reputation at risk, as well as a health and safety risk assessment for the security guard.
Go against your employment instructions and you would possibly lose your job.
It is the same as using physical force to control a child.
A teacher has the legal right to use physical force to discipline a child, or at least has that as a defence in law, but they could be a in breach of the education department policy if they did so, again likely to be de-registered.


CLP, Territory Alliance: Two seats each
It is quite unfortunate when you see the acronym for a Territory Alliance Member of Parliament. One could only imagine the raised eyebrows if this party achieves government, and we see the Minister for Corrections is a TAMP.


Do film’s omissions mislead viewers on school’s record?
Thank you Kieran for following this up.
Unfortunately it is missing a lot of info and certainly portrays a particular point of view, as did Utopia by John Pilger and the Four Corners report of youth detentions.
It is not so much what is said, but what is not.
There are a number of unsubstantiated quotes I have seen in relation to this report that are certainly not balanced or entirely truthful.
I am glad that you have chased this up, especially for the sake of the wonderful work the Sadadeen staff do.


Be Sociable, Share!

A new way to support our journalism

We do not have a paywall. If you support our independent journalism you can make a financial contribution by clicking the red button below. This will help us cover expenses and sustain the news service we’ve been providing since 1994, in a locally owned and operated medium.

Erwin Chlanda, Editor