Thanks Anita (Posted August 27, 2012 at 2:33 pm). It …

Comment on Alice singled out in German Foreign Office travel warning by Bob Durnan.

Thanks Anita (Posted August 27, 2012 at 2:33 pm). It would be very useful if you could give the German Foreign Office and Der Spiegel a thumbs up about how out of date their warnings have become, before too many young Deutschies decide to steer clear of us. An eyewitness account, “in language”, from a local like yourself about the much safer place it has become since the police and youth workers combined forces and introduced much more effective preventative measures would go some way to restoring the damaged reputation of Alice Springs.

Bob Durnan Also Commented

Alice singled out in German Foreign Office travel warning
Yes Rex, (Posted August 24, 2012 at 9:32 pm), I agree that Advance Alice and Action for Alice played important roles in getting the NT government and its agencies prepared to take some big risks in backing Operation Marathon. However, the TV ad campaign by Action for Alice was an ill-advised method for building pressure on the government, as it was essentially a big blunt instrument which possibly did irrepairable damage to the tourist industry by hammering an unwarranted level of fear into high relief in the international media’s image of Alice Springs. The ads also led to a heightened sense of self-importance amongst some of the youth who were shown repeatedly in macho poses.
A willingness of more people from the business community to join forces with the alcohol-reform movement may well have led to a critical mass that could have achieved significant government intervention at an earlier stage.
One other thought: while you are in the mood for handing out awards for bravery, I think it would not be too much to ask for you to consider including John Boffa, Russell Goldflam, Vince Kelly, and PAAC on the list of those deserving mention in dispatches. Their persistent rational arguments were probably quite decisive with both police and government, in securing realisation about the need for bold preventative action on the grog-related violence front.


Alice singled out in German Foreign Office travel warning
Alex Nelson (Posted August 23, 2012 at 3:32 pm) is, as usual, absolutely spot on with his facts.
Not only is it true that “the irony is that Alice Springs is considerably safer now than it was in the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s”: thanks to the excellent work by the police and youth workers, the town is also safer than it has been at any time in the period since the ‘90s.
The “winter-on-winter” data starting to become available for alcohol-related disturbances, crime, deaths and injuries indicate that the drop in incidents since the beginning of Operations Marathon and Daybreak (both commenced in the last half of May this year) is far beyond what anybody had dared hope to see. The police and government agencies have finally cracked a large proportion of the town’s problems. If they are permitted to continue these initiatives, we will enjoy a much improved social and economic climate, and probably also our own little cultural renaissance.
By the way: Hal Duell (Posted August 24, 2012 at 8:29 am) is correct to nominate the police dirt bike patrols for special mention. However, the YSOS patrols and the follow-up work by youth and social workers also deserves special recognition, along with the long hours of foot slog clocked up by ordinary constables outside the bottle-shops.


Recent Comments by Bob Durnan

Architect of Katherine’s masterplan to be Alice council CEO
James (Posted June 6, 2019 at 8:14 am): How many parks in Alice Springs commemorate Aboriginal leaders or dignitaries?
Nothing against Father Smith, but couldn’t we consider looking collectively at setting some priorities before rushing in to barrack for our favourite project?


Price family were sole complainants against Cocking & Satour 
Conservative (posted May 1, 2019 at 9:19 am): what do you mean by ‘props to Erwin’? Stage ‘props’? It doesn’t make sense.


Road toll drops by half
Like InterestedDarwinObserver, I think Assistant Commissioner Beer’s claim is a somewhat questionable one.
Given that the majority of NT road deaths are normally the result of single vehicle roll-overs on remote roads, it is questionable whether more intensive traffic policing in Alice would necessarily produce this good result as claimed.
We would need a much bigger sample and more details of the individual accidents to really get an idea about what is actually going on here.


Massive horse deaths now a risk to humans
Hal, (Posted April 14, 2019 at 1:29 am): Don’t be so disingenuous. It is obvious from the article that CLC staff have been trying very hard to get permission to act.
They have now made their frustrations known to the relevant authorities, who are able to step in.
My point is that your criticism should have been aimed at those responsible (the traditional owners in question), not at the CLC as an organisation, as the staff are trying to do their job and get something done about the situation.
I was at both Mulga Bore and Angula a little over a week ago, and found very few people at Mulga, and none at Angula.
There were no dead horses that I saw, or smell of dead horses, around the houses then at either place, but there may have been some elsewhere. Of course the carcasses should be disposed of, wherever they are; that is what the writer and the CLC are trying to achieve.


Massive horse deaths now a risk to humans
Hal: How would the Land Council stand legally if it were to destroy the property of a set of traditional owners without their permission? The CLC does not own the horses.
They are either the property of individual traditional owners and traditional owner family groups, or of persons who have contracts with the TOs to allow their horses to be on the TOs’ land.
Or else they are the responsibility of the particular Land Trust trustees on whose land they are located.
Legally the CLC as a statutory body can only consult and advise the traditional owners, and act on their instructions. It cannot make decisions for them without their permission.


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