Pretty quick to call the race card. Full marks to …

Comment on Alice grog source for huge region by Ray.

Pretty quick to call the race card. Full marks to Scullion for announcing the enquiry into the grog culture throughout the country, I think that is badly needed, however the government felt they had to prioritise the problems.
There is a problem across the country, but it is chronic in Aboriginal communities especially, so much like a nurse will triage patients according to who needs help first, it seems to me that this is what happened in this case.
I hope it extends to all of society after this initial one is complete. Why is everybody so keen to scream racist, before looking at reasons or getting the facts.
To me racism is the Goolagong Cawley tennis workshops that were open to all kids between 5 and 15, provided they are indigenous.
Try explaining that to an 8 year old who’s indigenous friend can go, but she is turned away, essentially because she is white.
Would have been better to me that all kids be encouraged to play together, and show that success comes down to effort, regardless of colour.

Recent Comments by Ray

Dujuan’s moving story and its missing pieces
Televised violence of prison officers? I think an apology might be in order after that throwaway line. I really hope you mean alleged, and I hope it is not in reference to the image shown on the Four Corners program where the conduct of all involved was investigated and found lawful and reasonable, with no charges being laid or pursued.


Anger with out-of-control kids: council needs to step up
Bloody hell Glenn, you are fearful for the kids? I would have thought your first fear would have been for the ratepayers who vote for you. Crime is crime, regardless of the skin colour.


Man robbed, but wait, there’s so much more on FB
Erwin, the knife was taken off a juvenile offender. If you contact the administrator of the site they can give you the details.
Managers of building sites years ago warned their staff of having a go at the kids at night in the CBD, due to the weapons they carried, such as this.


Curfew: sixth time lucky for Cr Melky?
Seems like it is needed more than ever. I have been here for over 20 years and can’t remember it quite this bad.
I certainly support a curfew, and it can really be made to suit our needs. Even the police at the bottle shops I have chatted to, and other long serving police agree that one is needed. I have never heard this before.
If a kid of a certain age is on the street between 10pm and 6am, “without lawful excuse” (going to or leaving work etc.) the police should have the power to take them to their home, and assess if it is safe in conjunction with a Territory Families worker and if Aboriginal, a Liaison Officer.
If it is deemed safe the parent is warned that if they are caught on the streets again for the next x period of time, they are on the banned drinkers register.
There is enough legislation in existence already that talks about a parent’s responsibility to provide for a child, to be legally responsible for them and to ensure they attend school.
If they are not able to be returned home due to unsafe conditions, that child should / could be taken to an outstation 100km out of town staffed by a member of their own skin group, and put through a program like Rainer Chlanda described in his recent article.
This would keep the kids on country, not in custody.
The parents also need to be told in no uncertain terms what needs to be done, and forced to do it. No matter what this type of program costs, it would have to be more economically viable than the crap going on at the moment.
There seems to be an average of one car stolen every single day, criminal damage to shops every single day, people not driving out to town at night because it is too unsafe.


Real young people, not the faceless offender
Under the watchful eye of an Elder, knowing they will get clobbered in they step too far out of line, these kids are away from the distractions of the city lights and peer pressure with no fear of consequence.

Here they show their full potential, and are being moulded in culturally acceptable behaviours. They are not subject to drunken relatives, parents too pissed to care, and the risk of either abuse or negligence is zero.

They love their Aboriginality and their cultural connections. This nurturing, guidance and lack of temptation may be the answer we are looking for, Rainer, now how can we implement it?

Maybe it shows that it is really not the kids at all, maybe the trick is to have parents or kin step up and provide this to these kids, and work out how to balance this with the need for learning the Western ways in addition to, not instead of their own culture. Can this be legislated?

Like it or not, it will take both if they are to survive as proud Aboriginal people and productive members of society.

Also remember that even though you cannot (or maybe do not want to) believe that they fit the profile of the “malicious, spiteful, undisciplined youth you hear some Alice Springs residents bemoan as the culprits behind break-ins”, they either are or have the potential to be one and the same, given the right circumstances.
Those differences in the circumstances, I believe, are in the first sentence of this comment. Not trying to be negative, just trying a bit of “truth telling” as I personally see it.

A well written and insightful article.

Well done.


Be Sociable, Share!

A new way to support our journalism

We do not have a paywall. If you support our independent journalism you can make a financial contribution by clicking the red button below. This will help us cover expenses and sustain the news service we’ve been providing since 1994, in a locally owned and operated medium.

Erwin Chlanda, Editor