The prof oversimplifies race relations. Yes, Aborigines are “pushed by …

Comment on Blackfellers buggering around whitefellers, where’s the off button? by Ralph Folds.

The prof oversimplifies race relations.
Yes, Aborigines are “pushed by white institutions to adapt to their purposes, requiring them to become like us,” but the Aboriginal reaction is much more complex than just resistance.
Assimilatory endeavours are often subverted when Aboriginal people embrace them but only to take what is valuable in their own lives while rejecting unwanted change.
It’s also a mistake to view Whitefellas as important enough to warrant active resistance.
Aboriginal people play cards to annoy Whitefellas?
They couldn’t be bothered and card playing has important social functions and a way of redistributing wealth.
Initiations, focussing on family, going away on ceremonies are a form of resistance?
These things may happen irrespective of what Whitefella’s think of them but they have long and valued traditions and are not merely expressions of resistance.
It’s not all about “us”.

Recent Comments by Ralph Folds

Industry development in the NT a government policy vacuum
Much of Fuller’s analysis is superficial because it does not take account of on the ground realities.
Take the proposition that royalty arrangements are heavily weighted in favour of the mining companies.
Fuller needs to explore the reasons for this rather than just suggest that governments can change this and bemoan the lack of transparency.
NT is not a favoured destination for mining investment, especially by comparison with WA.
Green groups and factional NT politics slow every project and add immense costs.
Aboriginal interests do the same and burden companies with training and employment programs that end up being of no interest to the local communities.
There is no significant NT workforce so FIFO is unavoidable and to the NT is costly.
Everything costs much more in the NT, build a road to a mine and it will cost at least twice as much as in WA.
Mining companies don’t really want to spend hundreds of millions in the NT unless it is an outstanding project and there are many outstanding projects nationally.
It is a buyers’ market.
This is the environment that miners and the NT Government negotiate within.
Swinging the balance of power to government will take a lot more than a new policy to increase the royalty payments.


The two territories at opposite ends of car sales stats
Our town is about to enjoy a super led recovery as hundreds of remote community residents withdraw $10,000 each with another $10,000 to come.
Council offices in remote communities are being overrun with requests.
They will be buying cars and then goods and services.


Masters Games this October, not 2022: Lambley
Great idea Robyn and to make sure we don’t get interstate visitors gate crashing the games before the borders are open we can ask the Joint Defence Base to patrol with drones.
Armed with Hellfire missiles, of course. Just in case.


Library no go for unaccompanied Alice teens
@ Anon agree 100% this exclusion is arguably racial based.
What timing!
This has the potential to go national and damage the image and reputation of our town.
Can you see the headline “Aboriginal youth excluded …”
The last thing our tourist industry needs now is any hint of racial discrimination.
Once again the council has made a poor decision.
Had this gone to a formal meeting it would surely have been opposed.
We have the traffic lights stuff up, making a suburban street a no standing zone and other operational decisions that show a lack of judgement.


Thinking big, anyone?
Capital expenditure (CAPEX) at $55 billion and the jobs number at 75,000.
The jobs number would be in the construction stage only.
The CAPEX is huge.
Much more realistic is the mining project up the road at Mt Peake with processing in Darwin.
CAPEX is about $800m.
1000 jobs in the construction phase and ongoing work for more than 300.
Training and jobs for Aboriginal people as part of the land use agreement worked out with the CLC.
Just about all the development work and approvals are complete.


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