@ David Woods (Posted August 17, 2016 at 11:25 am): …

Comment on Boardwalk now a permanent blight on the landscape by Alex Nelson.

@ David Woods (Posted August 17, 2016 at 11:25 am): I’m delighted at the irony of your comment, David – hands up all those who remember the pedestrian crossing that was constructed on the south side of Heavitree Gap late in 2013 and dismantled early the following year at considerable cost to the taxpayer? There seems to be something about bureaucrats devising capital works projects for the benefit of pedestrians in Alice Springs.
Mention of which reminds me of an attempt in the early 1970s to improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists in Heavitree Gap by the construction of a concrete path on the bed of the Todd River. I kid you not. No prizes for guessing what happened with the first flow of the river after that project was completed.
A question posed by Mark Wilson in the story linked above asked: “Can there be no end to obvious stupidity?” It appears this latest disaster along the base of Meyers Hill demonstrates the obvious answer is no.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

Boardwalk now a permanent blight on the landscape
From the heavy rains of January 2000 onwards I’ve documented this side of Meyers’ Hill with photographs and have frequently walked and cycled on the track that wound its way around the base of the hill on the Todd riverbank. I’ve come to know this vicinity intimately.
I worked at the Olive Pink Botanic Garden a decade ago when the initial project began to construct a cycle pathway around Meyers’ Hill (a part of the “Alice in 10” scheme begun by the previous CLP administration), that was halted after damage was done during the process of dismantling the boundary fence of the garden. However, whatever damage occurred on that occasion must surely pale into insignificance compared to the abomination that’s being imposed on that site now. It’s astonishingly over the top, as if inspired by the infamous Sydney monorail of the 1980s.
Surely the structure being built there now wasn’t envisaged in the original Alice in 10 project.
In my opinion there’s no reason why a far more low-key pathway sympathetic to that site could not have been constructed, something akin to the Wills Terrace footbridge that has stood the test of time (and every flow of the Todd River) since 1957.
This is disgraceful, and an indictment against everybody involved in this monstrosity. It clearly shows those involved have no idea of what they are doing. It’s so sad – this is the vicinity where Olive Pink used to sit in the 1930s writing up her anthropology notes and gained the inspiration for establishing a native flora reserve on the land adjacent to the south side of the hill.
I can only hope that in due course this structure will meet the same fate as the Sydney monorail and be torn down; but of course we the taxpayer will as usual be paying for it.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Mparntwe custodians: Lhere Artepe does not speak for us
@ Jack (Posted May 26, 2020 at 1:19 am): Change the scale of your figures (upwards, on a massive scale), widen the scope of your scenario, and you’ve got a perfect description of the Northern Territory for the entire period of “responsible” self-government.


Mparntwe custodians: Lhere Artepe does not speak for us
@ Alex Hope (Posted May 25, 2020 at 3:44 pm): I’ve provided a small reminder of previous shenanigans in my recent comment piece.
The NT Government is simply digging itself into an ever deeper hole; the problem it now has is that it precipitately and unnecessarily spent over $2m of taxpayers’ money to demolish a perfectly good public asset – the former Anzac Hill High School.
The NTG has committed itself to a course of action on this site that it can’t simply abandon, having already gone as far as it has with the expense and actions already taken.
If the Gunner Labor Government was to abandon the Anzac Oval Precinct now, it then faces huge criticism for all the damage it has now caused and for no justification at all.
Whatever criticisms might be directed at the old CLP regime (two decades plus ago), I think it was never on such a scale of bungling incompetence to what we’re now witnessing with the current hapless Labor Government on the home stretch to the imminent polls.
No wonder they’re putting all their hopes in Darwin.


Gallery row: Remember the dam?
@ Jack (Posted May 23, 2020 at 10:42 am): You seem to provide evidence for the existence of a parallel universe – Chansey Paech supports the gallery at the Anzac Oval Precinct despite the disapproval of Traditional Owners of the town area.


High season caravan occupancy rate: Zero.
“We won’t have a tourism industry here if we are not open by July.”
Well, according to CM Michael Gunner on a Darwin radio station today, the borders won’t be open until the beginning of August at the earliest, and only – effectively – if COVID-19 is eliminated in Australia.
Meanwhile Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has stated her state’s borders will likely remain closed until September.
Looks to me the Northern Territory is experiencing a change every bit as transformative as what happened here because of the Second World War.


A touch of light: native passionfruit
@ Domenico Pecorari (Posted May 15, 2020 at 11:41 am): Years ago I found that one way to increase the vigour of native passionfruit seedlings was to incorporate a small quantity of dry leaf litter that exhibits white mould into their soil or potting mix.
You find this material by uncovering accumulated piles of dry leaves under eucalypts, acacias or other native species.
Native passionfruit seeds are spread by birds so these plants germinate below where birds perch, typically under other trees and shrubs.
The roots of the seedlings presumably establish a symbiosis with the mould in the leaf litter to enable better absorption of soil nutrients.
It’s not unusual to find plants spread by birds growing in the trunks and branches of river red gums, where they’ve been able to take root in the soil of termite nests exposed high up in the trees.
Usually these are ruby saltbushes but at Pitchi Richi I’ve observed a large native passionfruit growing out of a river red gum several metres above the ground.


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