Sacredness = dollar value. …

Comment on Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred? by Ray.

Sacredness = dollar value.

Ray Also Commented

Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred?
@ Just Sayin. I agree, there is that side to it as well. My point was that under an Indigenous land use agreement, native title can be extinguished, if the monetary compensation is agreed upon. Everything has its price, if the price is right.
Those who choose to be offended by this will be, not much I can do about that.
Your comments about respecting culture and sacred sites are interesting.
I was unaware that business oportunities to bring tourists into town have been scrapped because we don’t show enough respect and therefore trust does not follow. This is a shame.
Which proposals were they, because the number of bookstores and galleries in town that promote Aboriginal culture are impressive, not to mention the quality of work done by CAAMA that show a culture thriving with modern technology.
Are you referring to the respect and trust shown to local business in town that are actually running and bringing tourists into town that are smashed up, are pelted with rocks, broken into, used as a toilets, etc?
Trust and respect are a two way street, and non-indigenous attractions are also responsible for bringing tourists into town as well.
There is both black and white history in this town, and tourists come here to experience both.
Or maybe they come here for one and learn about the other, how’s that for a win win?
I believe that many developers would be keen to get involved with a project on the Melanka site, but who wants to touch it with the complications of those sacred trees?
I am sure that if one of them died due to construction activity, a huge fine would be written into the contract (dollar value).
Instead, we have an unkempt eyesore in town that could be transformed into something amazing, but it just sits there until the price is right, or they blow over in the next big storm. If it was the tree itelf that was sacred, would a solution be to propogate a cutting and plant that in a place acceptable to the Arrente?
I remember that idea working for a single pine tree that featured on the Turkish peninsula just over 100 years ago.


Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred?
Hi Russell, glad to see that three words could stir up such a response. How dare you say I am a newcomer? I have been annoying you for years.
My three word initial comment simply stated the obvious. Aboriginal groups are able to negotiate with mining companies (for example) on the exploration / mining on their land.
By negotiate, I mean an agreement to do a certain activity for a particular consideration (money). Many mining companies have been charged and fined for damaging sacred sites.
So one group has agreed to be awarded compensation for the damage caused by the other.
The importance of the site can/has sometimes determined the monetary penalty. You can google that to find the factual links.
Hence, to some degree, sacredness = dollar value is correct.
I remember being told that an event I organized needed a welcome to country speech. I thought OK that’s a nice gesture, and when approaching the appropriate body, was told “yes would love to, the fee will be $300”.
I was gobsmacked that the opportunity to share culture with visitors from around the country was accompanied by a fee schedule.
Sometimes a simple comment is enough to start a conversation, which was my intention, and that worked quite well. Just because I choose not to have my full name published does not invalidate my right to an opinion, it could be that public comment on a public forum and having different opinion to the populist thinking, could be against a policy I work under.


Recent Comments by Ray

Now that the Rock can’t be climbed, visiting it will cost more
@ Watchin: As far as I was aware it has always been for three days, at least as far back as when I was there in 99 and 2000. That was the argument then, that we were only there for one day, why do we have to pay for three?


Climate change: Home insurance shock
From memory this is the same report that was described as “news to me” by the president of ( I think) the insurance association of Australia?
Sorry, I can’t remember where I read the reply to this when it was originally posted.
Either way the opportunity to develop the Todd River and in turn, manage the flood risk has been sadly wasted for many years.
The bike track from behind St Philips to the Telegraph Station is what the Todd River should look like.
The overgrown, tangled and clogged mess that occurs between Schwartz Crescent and out past Old Timers is a result of our occupation of this town since the beginning, and our influence destroying its natural beauty.
The fact that introduced grasses have taken hold through this tract is the obvious result of our love of a green lawn in the desert, and even I love my green lawn, but we have not dealt with the inadvertent impact of it.
This is what has encouraged the build-up of unnatural islands, and the redirection of the river’s course, not to mention the raising of the bed and clogging of the “artery” that runs through our town.
We must be one of the few towns where a river that runs through town is not managed and maintained as an integral part of the life of the town and the focus of activity.
The AAPA identified sacred trees as part of the Alice in Ten project in the early 2000s.
There were very few that needed to be kept as culturally significant, many many of the newer trees would hold no cultural significance, and should be removed as they would not have grown there but for our influence.
The same mapping should occur in the stretch I mentioned earlier. It needs to be cleaned out, the banks redefined and reinforced and shaped with caged rocks like along Railway Terrace.
The bank could be raised and levelled and beautified to become a central point.
The lawned area outside the Todd Tavern is beautiful, the river there is an eyesore and a disgrace.
For anybody who says we should not mess with nature, the opposite seems true.
The river has been left in ruin due to our activities.
We need the council to step up with the government, and give serious thought to bring it back to its former glory, as a centrepiece of our town, by clearing and restoring.
Water capture could be done for long term irrigation of the banks using green technology, and the other possibilities are boundless.


Council: push to declare climate emergency backfires
@ Marie: Just a quick couple of extra points Marie, you did ask people to tell you after all.
The claim that pacific islands are sinking has been proved false.
Tuvalavu was the prime example used, but it has actually been proven to be growing in land mass, not sinking.
No regulations as far as insulation when building? We built an extension about six years ago and certainly had to meet regulations when installing the windows, there had to be a certain UV transmission factor / UV radiation block out, required by the regulations.
As far as swimming pools go, and boot cattle productions, the amount of water is finite, meaning that as pool water evaporates, the water is taken into the atmosphere, and dispersed somewhere around the globe.
The water used in livestock productions is not gone forever, it all returns to the earth in the end, so please check some statements before making alarmist ones like these.
I agree we need to do more, but let’s base our arguments on all the facts, and not go off on alarmist falsities.


Rules for outback work travel may catch some out
This is a great result to see the regulator stepping up and putting businesses on notice that they cannot send workers out bush without taking all reasonable steps to ensure the safety of their workers.
One would hope they change their mind about letting Fair Work deal with the worker’s dismissal as there are certainly laws under the OH and S legislation that can punish firms that sack a worker for raising a safety concern. The NT has an atrocious record and it’s about time that a proactive approach was done.


Gallery business case slap in the face of custodians
1000 EXTRA visitors week? Really?
And the government leaders do not take a second and say exactly the same thing? Or do they push ahead and shift the blame to Ernst and Young?
I might believe maybe 100 visitors per week, ergo an adjusted economic input of $4.2 Million. Taking a more realistic figure, it will take a hell of a long tome to ever pay that back, especially adding in the relocation of the council or the building of the football fields whenever and where ever it is built.
I still don’t understand why the site at the Desert knowledge Precinct in not considered, with Yirara students just across the road for transition to employment training.
Even the Melanka site at the retail price and creative architecture or the disused fuel depot near Hungry Jack’s, once again creative architecture to meld with the landscape.
Even with the rehabilitation of the land prior to building it, it would probably make more economic, geographical and cultural sense.
Sorry, hard to type while I am laughing at these figures. Please ensure you archive these predictions Erwin.
I would love to be proven wrong five years after it is built!

[ED – No worries, it will be in our fully searchable archive, now spanning 25 years and containing about seven million words.]


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