Hi Russell, glad to see that three words could stir …

Comment on Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred? by Ray.

Hi Russell, glad to see that three words could stir up such a response. How dare you say I am a newcomer? I have been annoying you for years.
My three word initial comment simply stated the obvious. Aboriginal groups are able to negotiate with mining companies (for example) on the exploration / mining on their land.
By negotiate, I mean an agreement to do a certain activity for a particular consideration (money). Many mining companies have been charged and fined for damaging sacred sites.
So one group has agreed to be awarded compensation for the damage caused by the other.
The importance of the site can/has sometimes determined the monetary penalty. You can google that to find the factual links.
Hence, to some degree, sacredness = dollar value is correct.
I remember being told that an event I organized needed a welcome to country speech. I thought OK that’s a nice gesture, and when approaching the appropriate body, was told “yes would love to, the fee will be $300”.
I was gobsmacked that the opportunity to share culture with visitors from around the country was accompanied by a fee schedule.
Sometimes a simple comment is enough to start a conversation, which was my intention, and that worked quite well. Just because I choose not to have my full name published does not invalidate my right to an opinion, it could be that public comment on a public forum and having different opinion to the populist thinking, could be against a policy I work under.

Ray Also Commented

Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred?
@ Just Sayin. I agree, there is that side to it as well. My point was that under an Indigenous land use agreement, native title can be extinguished, if the monetary compensation is agreed upon. Everything has its price, if the price is right.
Those who choose to be offended by this will be, not much I can do about that.
Your comments about respecting culture and sacred sites are interesting.
I was unaware that business oportunities to bring tourists into town have been scrapped because we don’t show enough respect and therefore trust does not follow. This is a shame.
Which proposals were they, because the number of bookstores and galleries in town that promote Aboriginal culture are impressive, not to mention the quality of work done by CAAMA that show a culture thriving with modern technology.
Are you referring to the respect and trust shown to local business in town that are actually running and bringing tourists into town that are smashed up, are pelted with rocks, broken into, used as a toilets, etc?
Trust and respect are a two way street, and non-indigenous attractions are also responsible for bringing tourists into town as well.
There is both black and white history in this town, and tourists come here to experience both.
Or maybe they come here for one and learn about the other, how’s that for a win win?
I believe that many developers would be keen to get involved with a project on the Melanka site, but who wants to touch it with the complications of those sacred trees?
I am sure that if one of them died due to construction activity, a huge fine would be written into the contract (dollar value).
Instead, we have an unkempt eyesore in town that could be transformed into something amazing, but it just sits there until the price is right, or they blow over in the next big storm. If it was the tree itelf that was sacred, would a solution be to propogate a cutting and plant that in a place acceptable to the Arrente?
I remember that idea working for a single pine tree that featured on the Turkish peninsula just over 100 years ago.


Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred?
Sacredness = dollar value.


Recent Comments by Ray

Crims terrorise Gillen, three cops attacked
“It is not acceptable to assault police …”
Could not agree more, however the courts seem to keep accepting it. Why not minimum 12 months mandatory sentence? Just imagine the bleating from CAALAS and NAAJA if that was talked about.


Newmont gold mine: Aboriginal jobs, still trying
I wonder how it would go if the royalties are distributed to each language group dependent on the percentage of employees from each group.
If anybody says they believe the current royalty system is benefiting anybody in these communities (apart from new cars), I would quote Darrell Kerrighan and “tell ’em they’re dreamin”.


No Medevac when climate disaster starts
I wonder if the good doctor actually knows the power that is already generated by the solar installations in Alice Springs, both on private homes and in various solar installations at the Uterne facility and others just off the highways.
I wonder if he has heard of the Yarra Climate Action group or travelled through the SA coastline to see all the horrible looking wind farms that (spoil) dot the landscape.
It is very easy to join the mass hysteria of saying the government doing nothing without understanding what the government is actually doing, what the private sector is doing, and what the private sector is doing with the assistance of the government.
Can we do more? Quite possibly. However, the bucket of money is only so big, where does he suppose the funding comes from? Education, health, policing, national security, social services?
As a NATO Medic and MD, he is obviously intelligent. However, what is his expertise in Australian politics, alternative energy or climate sciences?
His current qualifications make him about as qualified as Beyoncé (pictured below) to lecture us on this topic.

 

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When 20% royalties shrivel to as little as 1%
Alex, you need to know how to interpret the legislation, sometimes in what is not written. You cannot complain that the government is acting unconstitutionally.
The constitution says the Federal Government HAS THE POWER to make laws for good government.
Nothing says they have to exercise that power or whose interpretation of good we are required to abide by.
Their interpretation just has to be different to yours. Ask any government if they believe the laws they are passing lead to good government, or course they do.
We can’t be getting ripped off if the big corporates have broken no tax laws and are acting lawfully.


Street kids: What cops can do
@ DY: No, not quite. Nobody is making Aboriginal people adopt white culture.
What is occurring is a call for those who wish to take advantage of all that a modern community has to offer, they need to comply with the rules that community has in place.
Much like various Aboriginal nation communities had their own societal rules, those living in an Australian town also have rules that define expected behaviour.
Break the rules, suffer the consequences.
The answer is really simple, if you do want to live in a town and society, you abide by their rules, if not go and enjoy another area where your behaviours are accepted.
Just trying to provide a courteous response to your incredibly racist and offensive comment.


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