In this age of Facebook and other powerful instant mass …

Comment on Copping ‘mental and physical abuse’ on top of serving time: Dylan Voller’s evidence to the NT Royal Commission by John Bell.

In this age of Facebook and other powerful instant mass communication Royal Commissions are fast losing relevance to their original purpose.
The mass visual giving of evidence and the appearance of individual witnesses such as Dylan Voller become the centrepieces in a media circus which resembles episodes of Prisoners or Days of Our Lives and other emotive-based melodramas on our tellie screens.
In this viewing environment, individual characters are are given a certain popular image and the real issues are drowned in an impossible mix of sensationalistically reported alleged incidents and mini crises.
Commission recommendations and their future implementation end up running a long distant second place to the melodrama. Right now, the star character is Dylan Voller and the question on everyone’s lips is – will he be awarded $$ compensation and if so, how much?
He is already an anti-hero star with a generation of teenage would-be victims and rebels.
The tears will flow over vivid accounts of torture and the guards will be on the backfoot trying to defend themselves to a young viewing audience.
My gut feeling is that Royal Commissions are fast becoming little more than a lawyers’ paradise, jostling for viewer ratings in a goldfish bowl of instant entertainment.

Recent Comments by John Bell

Is it time for a First Nations university?
The idea of a First Nation University begs the question – why?
What is it about indigenous academic study that demands that it be taught in a specialised (read: insular) learning and teaching environment?
And is the concept of First Nation heritage up for debate, or is it a closed shop that does not allow the special privilege of First Nation lineage to be debated?
I would have no particular objection to it as a non-First Nation human who would not be eligible to enrol anyway. But what exactly would be its purpose? Just a thought.


Council may take up slack of the NT government
Advocating council to step in to take a role in the NT government’s debt problem is a double-edged sword.
The danger is that the role of “small government” by local council increasingly blurs the demarcation of powers between elected Parliamentarians whose role is to legislate, and elected councillors whose role is delivery of essential services eg roads maintenance, collection of rates and rubbish collection.
Local councils everywhere are stepping stones for wannabe State and Territory pollies. Local council charter is not meant to be political.


Looks like Wazza’s back
I have been asking Wazza questions of accountability for significant expenditure of Commonwealth grant funds in a charity for the Indigenous Marathon Project for six and a half years now.
As the keeper of public trust for the Aboriginal people of remote tribal communities in Lingiari, Wazza should be transparent.
He should come clean now that he remains the keeper for the next three years.
I would be very happy to get to his electoral office in Alice somehow for a cup of coffee and a couple of simple answers in the public interest.


Anti-fracking Greens: Are jobs for the dole schemes legal?
No discussion about the state of the economy. Neither NT nor national.
The Greens everywhere avoid discussing how to repair and grow Australia’s economy like the plague.


Back to the future with Warren Snowdon
Warren has an unenviable task promoting Labor’s Federal fiscal policies in the Lingiari electorate with the millstone of the Gunner government financial disaster hanging around his neck.
Understandably, he distances Federal Labor from NT Labor with his response to Erwin’s questions: “The NT Government is responsible for any debt it incurs. It has a responsibility to repay it. And it will.”


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