Eli You say that if the Polynesians can put on …

Comment on Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain by Fred.

Eli You say that if the Polynesians can put on a cultural show, why cant we?
Well the cultural centre is far less ambitious that the spectacular Polynesian show.
So how’s it going?
Are you and the other members of council moving ahead with it?
Absolutely not from what I can see.
So why are you promoting an ambitious cultural show when, along with our other representatives, you can’t facilitate a cultural centre?
Stumbling with the baby steps while talking about running a marathon?
Running with an ambitious development while basic services are poor and very expensive?
Drifting away from the boring core functions of a council to run a political agenda?

Fred Also Commented

Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
Eli, It worries me that our council does not appear to be operating in the real world of Alice Springs
The local reaction to the development you have supported clearly demonstrates that.
Similarly your idea of a Polynesian cultural centre as in Hawaii is not going to happen here and frankly is absurd in our context.
One could write a book on the reasons for that.
So we need practical development that is based on our town and we need representatives with a firm and complete grasp of the local realities and sentiments.


Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
Eli you say that creating open space is good, but query how I would justify paying millions for buildings from private land owners to create this open space.
If open space is good why have you been supporting a development that destroys the best open space in the mall?
The most positive experience of Aboriginal people and culture many tourists get is through the painting sales on the Mall open space.
For many that is the sum total of their experience of another culture they have come half way around the world to meet.
I see positive interaction on the open space all the time.
Open space on the Mall is overdue to be revalued as a cultural meeting place for local Aboriginal people and tourists.
It is a tourist drawcard.
That’s how I would justify paying millions from the $30m the Council has to create more open space.


Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
This proposal is ghastly, inappropriate and destroys the best part of the Mall.
It comes close on the heels of the monstrous law and order edifice, the new supreme court building.
Spend the $30m to control rate increases and to unwind development to bring some of our town’s soul back.
Perhaps acquire buildings near the mall to be demolished and turned into open space.
The new proposal should be put on hold until the next council election.
That way ratepayers will get a chance to vote according to the candidates’ disposition towards it.
It is a worry that our council appears to be chronically incapable of coming up with development concepts that enhance the livability of our town.


Recent Comments by Fred

Dumbing down Alice Springs
We all know that the NT Government is heavily mired in crippling debt.
Of course, the CDU has to be downsized and it must happen in a sensible manner.
Simply, which courses are producing real outcomes, i.e. getting students jobs?
Higher education for remote students is laudable but has failed at huge expense over many years.
How many Aboriginal teachers and nurses are there who are actually employed?
Almost none.
There are many courses that lead to almost zero employment outcomes.
Art courses in the Correctional Centre is one of them and this must be discontinued.
Music was abolished some time ago but somehow art survived.
The NT can no longer pay for recreational courses.
The NT Government and CDU do have to slash costs but should maintain the courses and staff that are producing real employment outcomes.
The rest do have to go and the sooner the better. We are broke.


Mating odour to catch feral cats
Cats roam and I wonder how many much-loved pet cats have ended up on this rural property.
Cats should always be trapped and taken to the local shelter.
Shelter staff and volunteers will then check for a microchip to see if there is a registered owner and advertise online to try to re-home. They are dealt with humanely at all times.


Back to the future with Warren Snowdon
@ Frank Baarda: The helium is a byproduct of Central Petroleum’s (ASX CTP) Mt Kitty petroleum system to the far west of Alice Springs near the Kintore community.
The Suprise 1 well at Mt Kitty pumped oil for more than a year that was transported in tankers. Little has been reported by the company on the commercial possibilities of the helium.


End of search for Monika Billen
My drone flying friends say that not finding Monika is a disgrace.
Forget the old tech ground searches.
Fly the latest high tech drones equipped with high-resolution cameras or video and analyse the results.
She would have been found on day two after being reported missing.
After an initial cost of perhaps $100,000 the drone system would pay for itself within a year and the tourist industry would be better off.


The financial crisis in the Northern Territory
James, I suspect that remote community infrastructure does add to the NT’s revenue stream, as it always has. Case in point (admittedly dated):
Federal grant of $500,000 for remote preschool.
NT admin tax $250,000.
Old asbestos clad science block sent to the community (instead of dumping it}.
Over the next three months, Alice Springs tradies renovate the building.
There is no money left for painting so that becomes a school expense.
Darwin designed building has no security so is broken into and trashed, then closed for six months as the school tries to get it repaired.
So the NT Government gets a windfall profit, Alice Springs businesses do well and the community gets a high maintenance asbestos building.


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