Good concept, but get the popcorn ready. This seems to …

Comment on Indigenous art gallery centrepiece of Gunner’s plans for Alice by Ray.

Good concept, but get the popcorn ready. This seems to be suggesting that Aboriginal people are all united, and all see Alice Springs as their cultural home. All the teachings I have had and my understanding is that Australia is made up of 200 to 300 skin or language groups.
I would have thought Mr Paech would be all over this.
Maybe a centre that celebrates Central Australian Aboriginal people, but one that tries to incorporate all skin groups all over the country seems to completely ignore everything cultural awareness lessons have ever taught whitefellas here.
How do you give the same level of representation to the Arrernte and those from the Torres Strait in the one limited building? Surely all the schoolkids from Hobart would be best studying the land, culture, songlines and traditions of Tasmanian Aboriginies, and those from Broome would be better placed to learn about their saltwater people instead.
Take a leaf from places that are successful. In New Zealand, cultural centres concentrate on the Maori, not every inhabitant of the Pacific Islands.
We had a fantastic cultural centre here in the Panorama Guth, until it burnt down, and that concentrated on the desert peoples of Central Australia.
Look at the Desert Park, they concentrate on our part of Australia, and do a fantastic job.
We are a meeting place for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Pit land tribes, Alyawarre and others. Why not keep it at that?
Sections dedicated to these language groups would surely provide plenty of information for tourists who have come all this way to learn about Central Australian Aborigines.
If they want to learn about Yolngu, they will go up north. This current plan seems a bit like designing a centre for European culture, featuring French, Russian, English, Spanish, Greek and Italian cultures. But hey, these Europeans are all white, so they must be they same, Eh?
Maybe the design could be the “Big Caterpillar”.

Ray Also Commented

Indigenous art gallery centrepiece of Gunner’s plans for Alice
Evelyne, please read my comments again. You may have missed my entire point.
Yes, I understand what song lines are and what they mean, but was commenting that we cannot talk about a national Aboriginal centre in the light it is being presented in the story, as the Aboriginal nations are as different as the European nations are.
Despite the fact they live on the same continent, each country is vastly different, although they do share similarities, and have interacted over the centuries.
Song lines occasionally do cross “cultural country boundaries” and protocols exist for members of one tribe crossing into the country of others, and that is where there are indeed some similarities.
All nations and cultures share myths, legends and lore.
My point was, that we need to concentrate on the Central Desert Aboriginal people, as they are the ones that are here, and have the most influence, and are the ones we can consult with.
Saying it is a national Aboriginal centre demonstrates we still don’t get it.
The entrance to this centre should be the first point to explain to visitors that although Aboriginal people inhabit the entire continent, it is made up of hundreds of “countries” and this particular centre celebrates and explains to visitors the uniqueness of the TOs, their descendants and visitors that make up this “region”.
Steve makes a great point to.
I would love top see an indigenous café, staffed by original staff, featuring food using bush tucker, a forecourt with two or three ceremonial dance displays and culture talks, art galleries, basket weaving workshops and maybe tour guides that can on-sell tours to regions that the visitors want to see more of.
Then again, that’s just my vision, and really means nothing until the views and visions of the TOs are invited.


Recent Comments by Ray

Council: push to declare climate emergency backfires
@ Marie: Just a quick couple of extra points Marie, you did ask people to tell you after all.
The claim that pacific islands are sinking has been proved false.
Tuvalavu was the prime example used, but it has actually been proven to be growing in land mass, not sinking.
No regulations as far as insulation when building? We built an extension about six years ago and certainly had to meet regulations when installing the windows, there had to be a certain UV transmission factor / UV radiation block out, required by the regulations.
As far as swimming pools go, and boot cattle productions, the amount of water is finite, meaning that as pool water evaporates, the water is taken into the atmosphere, and dispersed somewhere around the globe.
The water used in livestock productions is not gone forever, it all returns to the earth in the end, so please check some statements before making alarmist ones like these.
I agree we need to do more, but let’s base our arguments on all the facts, and not go off on alarmist falsities.


Rules for outback work travel may catch some out
This is a great result to see the regulator stepping up and putting businesses on notice that they cannot send workers out bush without taking all reasonable steps to ensure the safety of their workers.
One would hope they change their mind about letting Fair Work deal with the worker’s dismissal as there are certainly laws under the OH and S legislation that can punish firms that sack a worker for raising a safety concern. The NT has an atrocious record and it’s about time that a proactive approach was done.


Gallery business case slap in the face of custodians
1000 EXTRA visitors week? Really?
And the government leaders do not take a second and say exactly the same thing? Or do they push ahead and shift the blame to Ernst and Young?
I might believe maybe 100 visitors per week, ergo an adjusted economic input of $4.2 Million. Taking a more realistic figure, it will take a hell of a long tome to ever pay that back, especially adding in the relocation of the council or the building of the football fields whenever and where ever it is built.
I still don’t understand why the site at the Desert knowledge Precinct in not considered, with Yirara students just across the road for transition to employment training.
Even the Melanka site at the retail price and creative architecture or the disused fuel depot near Hungry Jack’s, once again creative architecture to meld with the landscape.
Even with the rehabilitation of the land prior to building it, it would probably make more economic, geographical and cultural sense.
Sorry, hard to type while I am laughing at these figures. Please ensure you archive these predictions Erwin.
I would love to be proven wrong five years after it is built!

[ED – No worries, it will be in our fully searchable archive, now spanning 25 years and containing about seven million words.]


Online hate speech by leading tourism figure
Erwin, thanks for contacting me and explaining the reasons for not publishing my [earlier] comment.
I won’t repeat my words but it is important to maintain my sentiment, and that is I do not condemn the language used by Mr Thompson, apart from LBC (which I could interpret as Lovely Bloody Children (sarcastic), or Loose bloody cannons).
I would use the same other description, but at your request will not repeat it in my comment here.
Your headline uses the term hate speech, however I personally believe that it is a symptom of the frustrations and anger felt by this entire community by these actions.
Even though as you pointed out these actions were probably perpetrated by children, that is no excuse as they are fully aware of their actions.
Would your jaw be any less broken by a rock thrown by a muscular 14yo than a skinny 18yo?
Even today outside Yeperenye a child of no more than 8, ran in front of my car by accident, a result of kids just being kids, in this case by the time her mum realised what was about to happen, it was too late.
After I had braked to avoid it, the kid immediately jumped back, because she knew that running in front of a car could have consequences.
She knew immediately the consequences of being hit by a car hence her instinct of recoiling at the last second (a lack of attentiveness by me would have certainly seen her hit).
They know the consequences of being bitten by a snake, so they give them a wide berth, and they know of the consequences of disrespecting bigger, stronger kids, so I do not believe they are too young to understand the consequences of their actions.
In this case it is reinforced by the TV campaigns.
As mentioned by other commentators here, it is the frustration of more excuses and sympathy for the perpetrator, and only a cursory thought for the victim.
Solutions?
That’s not my job, but of it were it would be as an Aboriginal leader suggested at a recent meeting I attended: 100km out bush on an outstation, on country, run by their kin, and educated on what is expected of them, in the community they live in.
In all societies, black or white, social exclusion is used until the rules are understood and followed to some degree. It worked in the 70s, it could again, and needs to be seriously considered here.


Youth crime: compassion alone is no solution
This lawyer is by the very definition a bleeding heart, concerned only with her client and the publicly funded pay cheque she picks up.
Nothing about the victims of these kids, who would be glad to see them paying the price of their ways. She also fails to mention the multiple chances and warnings these kids get.
They don’t get locked up for a first or fourth or sometimes 10th offence. Would be good to know the number of chances this particular client got.
As far as the grandmothers go, in keeping the kids close: Too late, keep them close when they first get into trouble and they would not, ever, be in this place.
And no the words like tortured that always come into play, even though the kids get meals and safe beds every day, pizza on weekends and visits from footy teams when they are in town.
I think the ones who suffer torture are the staff, who are very dedicated but end up becoming punching bags because the rights of these violent young criminals (that’s what they are) seem to trump the expectations of a safe workplace.


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