Thanks for your continued unravelling of this situation, Erwin. In what …

Comment on Independent assessment of government funding still in future by Phil Walcott.

Thanks for your continued unravelling of this situation, Erwin.
In what ways do the the two major local Aboriginal organisations mentioned work together with each other to provide services?
Given that safe, adequate housing is a major determinant for health and education parameters, what programs to the two organisations co-operatively deliver so that the input of each supports the input from the other? How is the funding shared across both agencies?
What are the salary levels of the respective CEOs and senior management of the organisations mentioned?
I’m left to ponder as to why neither organisation is prepared to answer your questions about external performance reviews that would provide some answers on the levels of success they are achieving?
Why is the Federal government throwing another $10 million over four years (how did they arrive at that figure BTW?) for yet another review?
Surely, one could expect, that program evaluations would be conducted as part of any program delivery as part of that process so relevant data could be captured in real time.
Why is it that every time there are questions raised about why services are not achieving targets around KPIs (when we get to know what those are), we get a response like “we’re working on it” or “let’s have a review and report” or “let’s have a Royal Commission” where whatever recommendations that are suggested seldom get actioned?
I believe that there are many good people working in NGO, government and private sector agencies who aim to deliver better outcomes.
They are, however, stuck in bureaucratic systems that are not really designed to deliver better outcomes at all.
They merely reinforce the dysfunction of the system to retain their highly paid employment. It’s the models that are broken, not the good will of the people trying to effect positive change.
Some people earning six figure salaries in fact perpetuate the dysfunction because, if they did their jobs properly, dysfunction would lessen, the issues would resolve and they would no longer be required.
Some in the upper echelons of these power silos are keen to maintain the status quo because it keeps them in highly paid roles while achieving little positive outcomes for the people they are charged with delivering services to. So the system rolls on.
Good luck with your further, on-going investigations.

Phil Walcott Also Commented

Independent assessment of government funding still in future
Thanks again, Anonymous … curiouser and curiouser!
When will the secret silos be made transparent and accountable?
Time to change the system structure!


Independent assessment of government funding still in future
Thanks, Anonymous.
I’m left to ponder why that is so? Got any history as to why two significantly publically funded organisations (in excess of $60 million taxpayer dollars each year) don’t work together when it’s patently obvious that they should?
Funding should be tied to them doing so.
Board of Directors being paid? How much? I sit on several boards and don’t get paid for any of them.
‘Whatever happened to “giving back to community” for the benefit of the whole?


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