It’s all very well for people to bleat that the …

Comment on Federal Budget: Stand on your own two feet, NT! by Careful with that $, Eugene.

It’s all very well for people to bleat that the NT “has to stand on its own two feet”, but the NT simply doesn’t have anywhere remotely close to the private investment capital or the amount of reliable government revenue income needed to do so.
The relatively piddling amounts of gas royalties (predicted to be only $20 million per year at the most generous estimate, in a decade or two after a decision to begin widespread fracking), and a small growth in income from payroll tax that would start to accrue from an expansion of fracking, wouldn’t pay for much infrastructure.
Nor would fracking royalties begin to clock in in time to do what’s needed now.
Another alternative would be to divert funds away from NTG investment in education, health, shelter and other desperately needed community services, thus descending further into Indigenous disadvantage and further widening the gap, with consequent higher Aboriginal death and disease rates, lower life expectancy, lower education attainments and worse poverty.
The logical consequences of this would also be higher crime and prison costs, the need for even more investment in police, courts and prisons, and a descent further into hell for the NT’s future.
We need to remember that the NT would not have more than a small fraction of its present tourism infrastructure if it wasn’t for previous government investment in building Alice Springs, Yulara, Uluru, Kakadu, Darwin and the Stuart, Barkly, Victoria River and Lasseter Highways and roads like the Mereenie Loop.
There would be no Convention Centres, Casinos, Double Trees, RFDS or Desert Park without the government investment, loans, subsidies and guarantees for these projects.
There is unlikely to be any top rate tourist lodges built in the West and East Macdonnells, or other major new tourist attractions, without similar government support, as there is no sign of the big private money (come on down, Sitzler brothers!) investing in such projects of their own volition.
Therefore Gunner is correct: Like Porky Everingham in the past, we have to look to the Feds and the Commonwealth Grants Commission to underwrite our infrastructure expansion at a much higher level, if the Territory is going to have any chance of growing the local economy.

Recent Comments by Careful with that $, Eugene

Architect of Katherine’s masterplan to be Alice council CEO
James (Posted June 6, 2019 at 8:14 am): How many parks in Alice Springs commemorate Aboriginal leaders or dignitaries?
Nothing against Father Smith, but couldn’t we consider looking collectively at setting some priorities before rushing in to barrack for our favourite project?


Price family were sole complainants against Cocking & Satour 
Conservative (posted May 1, 2019 at 9:19 am): what do you mean by ‘props to Erwin’? Stage ‘props’? It doesn’t make sense.


Road toll drops by half
Like InterestedDarwinObserver, I think Assistant Commissioner Beer’s claim is a somewhat questionable one.
Given that the majority of NT road deaths are normally the result of single vehicle roll-overs on remote roads, it is questionable whether more intensive traffic policing in Alice would necessarily produce this good result as claimed.
We would need a much bigger sample and more details of the individual accidents to really get an idea about what is actually going on here.


Massive horse deaths now a risk to humans
Hal, (Posted April 14, 2019 at 1:29 am): Don’t be so disingenuous. It is obvious from the article that CLC staff have been trying very hard to get permission to act.
They have now made their frustrations known to the relevant authorities, who are able to step in.
My point is that your criticism should have been aimed at those responsible (the traditional owners in question), not at the CLC as an organisation, as the staff are trying to do their job and get something done about the situation.
I was at both Mulga Bore and Angula a little over a week ago, and found very few people at Mulga, and none at Angula.
There were no dead horses that I saw, or smell of dead horses, around the houses then at either place, but there may have been some elsewhere. Of course the carcasses should be disposed of, wherever they are; that is what the writer and the CLC are trying to achieve.


Massive horse deaths now a risk to humans
Hal: How would the Land Council stand legally if it were to destroy the property of a set of traditional owners without their permission? The CLC does not own the horses.
They are either the property of individual traditional owners and traditional owner family groups, or of persons who have contracts with the TOs to allow their horses to be on the TOs’ land.
Or else they are the responsibility of the particular Land Trust trustees on whose land they are located.
Legally the CLC as a statutory body can only consult and advise the traditional owners, and act on their instructions. It cannot make decisions for them without their permission.


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