@ Mr Henry: Somehow I would worry about Scrubby in …

Comment on 13 year old denied bail after rampage by John Bell.

@ Mr Henry: Somehow I would worry about Scrubby in today’s PC 18C environment.
Eminently sensible decisions with an innate understanding of local rascals, cops and lawyers in the Alice. Bluntly delivered on the nose, no fancy gobbledigook Sir Humphrey-speak, Scrubby’s down-to-earth comments would not survive five minutes in this hypersensitive Section 18C society of human rights.
The HRC crowd would have him hanging by the thumbs in their Pitt Street Dungeon … in the overcrowded Misogynist Male Division.
But heck, Scrubby was on the mark … and hugely entertaining! An NT character!

John Bell Also Commented

13 year old denied bail after rampage
@ Ms de Vere: I very much agree with you that the issue of education for young people and youth crime in remote Aboriginal communities is a most important social concern.
At the moment, no one seems to have an effective or definitive solution that fits all. Individual cases such as this young 13-year-old lad before the court is distressingly far too frequent.
Reading the Ccourt transcript of this case as reported by Alice Springs News Online, while admittedly not knowing the lad personally, nevertheless I felt that Magistrate Borchers has made the best decision, in everyone’s best interests, including the welfare of the lad.
Seminars and 1990s plans all have their proper place in addressing this social problem holistically in the community.
But in the urgent reality of this particular individual incident here and now, Magistrate Borchers’ decision provides the best opportunity (in my limited opinion) for a good balance of justice, fairness and compassion in this particular case while the wider solution is being argued, discussed and generally kicked around at great length in the community.


13 year old denied bail after rampage
@ Ms de Vere: I raised my eyebrows a little bit when I read your quote:”Who was protecting them from predatory guards and psycholigical damage and brutalisation by a bullying dysfunctional system, who held the duty of care?”
I suspect you are a devotee of the ABC position of victimhood generally which is your right.
However, I suspect that there is an overwhelming majority of caring ordinary punter Don Dale staff who would be deeply offended by your categorisation of predator in a very difficult system in which they worked diligently with a duty of care and as conscientiously as you and I would in such circumstances.
This lad in front of magistrate Borchers is a danger to himself as much as he is to others.
The human resources needed to get the lad on the straight and narrow before he reaches adulthood have been stretched to the limit.
There comes a point where duty of care towards the community, his past victims and his very likely future victims becomes paramount.
I would ask you two questions: (1) are you siding with the lad’s CALAAS lawyer or with judge Borchers? (2) What is your solution?


Recent Comments by John Bell

Arrernte Mary and Jesus watch over Alice’s Catholics
Returning to Alice every year in the first week of May throughout the late 70s, through the 80s and 90s to 2002, I made it a ritual journey to Our Lady of the Sacred Heart church, to sit up the back late in the afternoon, contemplating.
The late arvo sunset would stream through the stained glass windows, casting amber, red, green shadows down across the pews.
Looking up at the stained glass figures in the silence, contemplating, was serene, peaceful and beautiful.
It never failed, every year. It was a great feeling.
So I’m looking forward to getting back to the Alice once more to sit and contemplate Mrs Wallace’s painting Urtakwerte Atywerrenge Anthurre / Very Sacred Heart.
Thank you, Kathleen. Just wonderful.


Labor, CLP discuss preference swaps: Scott McConnell
@ Stewart Hyway: At Federation there was only one organised major party in the Federal Parliament the Labour Party (later changed in 1913 to the American spelling Labor by its American leader King O’Malley).
The rest of the Parliament consisted of individuals who were never going to have any clout getting legislation passed if Labour was against it.
So after a few years they organised little groups with similar interests, developing gradually to parties with clout.
If we stop voting for the major parties, then two things are sure to happen: We will return initially to an early post-Federation of a parliament of not even one party, and MPs will be running around aimlessly pushing their own individual agenda items.
Nothing getting done.
Then, when it becomes obvious that things are a chookhouse mess, the brighter MPs will put their heads together … and hey presto! Parties are formed once more!
Human nature never changes mate. There is nothing new under the sun … especially in the power mindset of our pollies.


Politicking or community: What to do about youth crime?
@ Ted Egan. I note your comment “The Arranta Elders must be invited to call the shots”.
I accept your long history of very special involvement in the Aboriginal community.
In view of the reality of the current difficult tribal population mix in Alice, how do you propose this invitation should be extended?
By whom?
And how can the Arranta people call the shots in the practical day to day governance of the town?
Do you have a plan to be implemented? I am interested in your views.


Climate: Spreading the word across generations
Has Alice Rotary committed to any specific action as a direct consequence of the students’ presentation?
Are there any plans for a further similar representation at a Rotary dinner or function?


Politicking or community: What to do about youth crime?
@ Ted Egan: Ted, I note with interest your reference to the “Bob Beadman towns” proposed so many years ago.
I first met Bob when I went to work for the National Aboriginal Sports Foundation in Canberra in 1981.
Bob was in Aboriginal Affairs. Bob showed a genuine interest in our work to promote sport for Aboriginal youth.
In 1982 when the NASF held the first ever presentation of Aboriginal national youth sport awards on Channel 7’s Sunday World of Sport in Melbourne on February 14, 1982, Bob was the first to ring us and congratulate Brian Dixon, Syd Jackson and the board.
Then in 1992 Bob was an ATSIC manager who gave evidence in the Castan human rights tribunal case. Bob has certainly been around in Aboriginal youth affairs.


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