Yes Ralph, of course the community must look after this …

Comment on Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS by Evelyne Roullet.

Yes Ralph, of course the community must look after this troubled young man.
But which community? And how? Send him back on the street with no support? Or put him in a rehabilitation centre / or a good boarding house where he will be disciplined and loved?
For the ones who despair let me tell you that our dilemma with trouble youth is not new:
“The world is passing through troublous times. The young people of today think of nothing but themselves. They have no reverence for parents or old age. They are impatient of all restraint. They talk as if they knew everything, and what passes for wisdom with us is foolishness with them. As for the girls, they are forward, immodest and unladylike in speech, behavior and dress.”
(From a sermon preached by Peter the Hermit in A.D. 1274)
“I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on frivolous youth of today, for certainly all youth are reckless beyond words … When I was young, we were taught to be discreet and respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly wise [disrespectful] and impatient of restraint”.
(Hesiod, 8th century BC)
“The children now love luxury; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are tyrants, not servants of the households. They no longer rise when their elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize over their teachers.”
Commonly attributed to Socrates by Plato.
Of course it does not mean that we must do nothing.
It comes to my mind that we are asked on TV or the internet to sponsor children overseas: Why not sponsor a child in our own community?

Evelyne Roullet Also Commented

Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
I agree with you Alex: One part-time worker with CAALAS is not able to “work closely with EVERY SINGLE young person going through Central Australian court system, their family, community, lawyer, school and other service-providers to provide the young person with the support they need to get back on track and stay out of trouble”. But has CAALAS asked for more help?


Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
Peter, it is obvious that we do not see or understand the same from the court transcript.
I see the judge interrupting the lawyer when the lawyer does not answer the question or has no clue.
The lawyer was not prepared and I feel this lad was misrepresented.
A judge makes judgement with the facts presented to him in a clear fashion not with “if’ and “may be”.
In a government of laws, the responsibility of the courts is to interpret and apply the law.
Each case before a court of law involves a controversy that the court must resolve as the institution in which every member of the community must have confidence. Each case presents its own unique set of facts and issues. The role of the judicial branch is to do justice according to law in each case.
As Chief Justice James Spigelman AC (Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales 19 May, 1998,until 31 May 2011) has explained: “The desire of bureaucrats and others to measure performance risks the wood being missed for the trees.”
I feel it is the case here.


Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
@ My view 100% with you:
Parents and educators know that love mixed with firm discipline is what produces functional happy children.
When we discipline children we show them that we care.
To discipline is not to punish, is not to command obedience, it is to teach and a disciple is a student.
The word “discipline” is from the Latin word disciplina meaning “instruction and training”. It’s derived from the root word discere – “to learn.”
Discipline is to study, learn, train, and apply a system of standards.


Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

Youth crime: compassion alone is no solution
Karen, you are prompt in judging others. I am one of the ones you judge to be excessively soft-heart or liberal. Bleeding heart is in fact informal but derogatory.
May be those “bleeding hearts” would love to look after “these children” if rules and regulations were not impeding the process.
The ones who know me will tell you that I am not soft, to the contrary, but have learned that you can be strict with a loving heart.
May I ask you if you were a goody goody two shoes when you were a teenager?


Youth crime: compassion alone is no solution
Regardless of whether or not our desires are the “right thing,” the act of inflicting punishment always creates an “us vs. them” rift between adult and child, and we are dealing with children.
When we punish, we reduce a child’s ability to focus on another’s experience and be accountable. These are the roots of empathy and compassion, which are the precursor to healthy relationships and a well-functioning society.
Punishment always brings the focus of the punished onto themselves. One cannot think of others, acknowledge wrongdoing, or aim to make amends while being made to suffer.
We have to ask ourselves if prison is effective as a punishment and deterrent for juveniles, or does it harden a young person who might otherwise recover?
Research on adolescent brain development does not provide an excuse for culpability, but it shows that youth are amenable to treatment in ways that adults are not. Additionally, given what we know about the development of the adolescent brain, how it processes risks and rewards, deterrence through the threat of incarceration is likewise ineffective at controlling the behavior of youth. Therefore, prison is never an effective punishment for youth.
The challenge, then, is two-fold: to find ways to make punishment more effective and to tackle the causes of offending through high-quality rehabilitation.
The origins of offender rehabilitation in Australia can be traced back to the early penal colonies and, in particular, to the work of Alexander Maconochie, a prison governor on Norfolk Island in 1840. Maconochie introduced the idea of indeterminate rather than fixed sentences, implemented a system of rehabilitation in which good behaviour counted towards prisoners’ early release, and advocated a system of aftercare and community resettlement
In my opinion juvenile prison should be more like a boarding houses with house parents looking after the welfare of different age groups and certainly not close to an adults detention centre.


Gunner goofs: No council ‘decisions’ on gallery site
“Who is silent is taken to agree.”
Cr Bank and Cr Melky, who do not agree, should not attend the meetings and the public will know who is betraying our trust.


Is it time for a First Nations university?
Just a minute, I ask myself, did you not protest in Africa against apartheid? Do you not hear day after day we have to close the gap?
So what are you doing in a country that is becoming like South Africa?
Legal aid for Indigenous only! Health clinics for Indigenous only! And, now a university for Indigenous only! The gap is becoming wider and will never close.


Hall of Fame has to pay for manager the government appointed
We are under the wings of incompetent ministers, a group who has no idea how to run a business, cannot follow its own regulations, wasting our taxes monies and certainly does not know the meaning of public relations.
But really, who is responsible for this fiasco? Responsible for making us the laughing stock of Australia?
All those who elected this government!
Until a minor party is getting a chance, we’ll be always trapped between Scylla and Charybdis.
PS: I have a diploma in diplomacy which means that I am able to dish insults in a very nice way.


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