I disagree with the statement these trees are being lost …

Comment on Save our trees: reduce Buffel, call 000, collaborate by Ray.

I disagree with the statement these trees are being lost to wildfires.
These fires are normally deliberately lit, which makes them a result of a lack of respect, vandalism or arson.
There are fines under the Fire Act / Criminal Code or some such legislation that covers the lighting of bushes or trees.
Have these provisions ever been used? A lot of the time these are comfort fires lit by illegal campers. Move them out, save some trees.

Ray Also Commented

Save our trees: reduce Buffel, call 000, collaborate
I wrote to a council hopeful just recently, expressing my ideas about the river. I lived in Bundaberg, and Brisbane for many years, both cities/towns that have a river running through them. Both of these towns treated the river as just a part of life, just being there, for many years. It is only in the last 20 – 30 years that these towns really embraced the river. They looked after the banks, they cleaned them up and stopped using them as a dumping ground and beautified them. Now, as a result, they are a focal point for the community, festivals, and lifestyles. Some detractors might say, there is a big difference, the Todd River is dry. I have lived here long enough to understand the Territory attitude, and by my interpretation of that, the response would be why should a lack of water stop us.
I remember attending the Alice in 10 meetings and remember the aerial photos identifying the sacred trees, as defined by the TOs. The idea was that whatever work was done, those trees would be protected.
We have a world renowned feature here in the centre of our town. The area used for the Henly-on-Todd looks beautiful because it is used for something and it receives attention. The rest of it looks like an unkempt, untidy backyard of an abandoned house.
Cleaning it up and using the “dredged” sand to build up levee banks could mitigate the flood risk, removing the choking buffel and new, non-sacred trees further down would free up the flow, allowing peak water heights to be reduced, allowing the land adjacent to the river to be used for a multitude of activities. Preventing the restrictions down stream could protect any infrastructure that was put in place.
With well thought out manicuring of these banks, it could be a beautiful public space we all could enjoy. I remember in my recent WA holiday, seeing a couple of towns that had massive skate parks, beautifully manicured and maintained, that were on display for all, and integrated into the towns’ open spaces. Families were there enjoying BBQs whilst the kids enjoyed skate boarding. It was not in some out of the way, fenced off dimly lit area, where most kids were afraid to go. I expect responses to this to explain all the reasons it won’t work, I would rather hear how it could.


Recent Comments by Ray

Council: push to declare climate emergency backfires
@ Marie: Just a quick couple of extra points Marie, you did ask people to tell you after all.
The claim that pacific islands are sinking has been proved false.
Tuvalavu was the prime example used, but it has actually been proven to be growing in land mass, not sinking.
No regulations as far as insulation when building? We built an extension about six years ago and certainly had to meet regulations when installing the windows, there had to be a certain UV transmission factor / UV radiation block out, required by the regulations.
As far as swimming pools go, and boot cattle productions, the amount of water is finite, meaning that as pool water evaporates, the water is taken into the atmosphere, and dispersed somewhere around the globe.
The water used in livestock productions is not gone forever, it all returns to the earth in the end, so please check some statements before making alarmist ones like these.
I agree we need to do more, but let’s base our arguments on all the facts, and not go off on alarmist falsities.


Rules for outback work travel may catch some out
This is a great result to see the regulator stepping up and putting businesses on notice that they cannot send workers out bush without taking all reasonable steps to ensure the safety of their workers.
One would hope they change their mind about letting Fair Work deal with the worker’s dismissal as there are certainly laws under the OH and S legislation that can punish firms that sack a worker for raising a safety concern. The NT has an atrocious record and it’s about time that a proactive approach was done.


Gallery business case slap in the face of custodians
1000 EXTRA visitors week? Really?
And the government leaders do not take a second and say exactly the same thing? Or do they push ahead and shift the blame to Ernst and Young?
I might believe maybe 100 visitors per week, ergo an adjusted economic input of $4.2 Million. Taking a more realistic figure, it will take a hell of a long tome to ever pay that back, especially adding in the relocation of the council or the building of the football fields whenever and where ever it is built.
I still don’t understand why the site at the Desert knowledge Precinct in not considered, with Yirara students just across the road for transition to employment training.
Even the Melanka site at the retail price and creative architecture or the disused fuel depot near Hungry Jack’s, once again creative architecture to meld with the landscape.
Even with the rehabilitation of the land prior to building it, it would probably make more economic, geographical and cultural sense.
Sorry, hard to type while I am laughing at these figures. Please ensure you archive these predictions Erwin.
I would love to be proven wrong five years after it is built!

[ED – No worries, it will be in our fully searchable archive, now spanning 25 years and containing about seven million words.]


Online hate speech by leading tourism figure
Erwin, thanks for contacting me and explaining the reasons for not publishing my [earlier] comment.
I won’t repeat my words but it is important to maintain my sentiment, and that is I do not condemn the language used by Mr Thompson, apart from LBC (which I could interpret as Lovely Bloody Children (sarcastic), or Loose bloody cannons).
I would use the same other description, but at your request will not repeat it in my comment here.
Your headline uses the term hate speech, however I personally believe that it is a symptom of the frustrations and anger felt by this entire community by these actions.
Even though as you pointed out these actions were probably perpetrated by children, that is no excuse as they are fully aware of their actions.
Would your jaw be any less broken by a rock thrown by a muscular 14yo than a skinny 18yo?
Even today outside Yeperenye a child of no more than 8, ran in front of my car by accident, a result of kids just being kids, in this case by the time her mum realised what was about to happen, it was too late.
After I had braked to avoid it, the kid immediately jumped back, because she knew that running in front of a car could have consequences.
She knew immediately the consequences of being hit by a car hence her instinct of recoiling at the last second (a lack of attentiveness by me would have certainly seen her hit).
They know the consequences of being bitten by a snake, so they give them a wide berth, and they know of the consequences of disrespecting bigger, stronger kids, so I do not believe they are too young to understand the consequences of their actions.
In this case it is reinforced by the TV campaigns.
As mentioned by other commentators here, it is the frustration of more excuses and sympathy for the perpetrator, and only a cursory thought for the victim.
Solutions?
That’s not my job, but of it were it would be as an Aboriginal leader suggested at a recent meeting I attended: 100km out bush on an outstation, on country, run by their kin, and educated on what is expected of them, in the community they live in.
In all societies, black or white, social exclusion is used until the rules are understood and followed to some degree. It worked in the 70s, it could again, and needs to be seriously considered here.


Youth crime: compassion alone is no solution
This lawyer is by the very definition a bleeding heart, concerned only with her client and the publicly funded pay cheque she picks up.
Nothing about the victims of these kids, who would be glad to see them paying the price of their ways. She also fails to mention the multiple chances and warnings these kids get.
They don’t get locked up for a first or fourth or sometimes 10th offence. Would be good to know the number of chances this particular client got.
As far as the grandmothers go, in keeping the kids close: Too late, keep them close when they first get into trouble and they would not, ever, be in this place.
And no the words like tortured that always come into play, even though the kids get meals and safe beds every day, pizza on weekends and visits from footy teams when they are in town.
I think the ones who suffer torture are the staff, who are very dedicated but end up becoming punching bags because the rights of these violent young criminals (that’s what they are) seem to trump the expectations of a safe workplace.


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