@ Bob Beadman. Bob provides thoughtful detail to the history …

Comment on CDP work for the dole scheme gets a hammering by John Bell.

@ Bob Beadman. Bob provides thoughtful detail to the history of the various Federal government employment initiatives that began with Liberal Minister William Wentworth’s Training Allowance Scheme in 1967.
The first training allowance payments began to about 30 communities throughout the NT in late February 1968.
The training allowance scheme was an effort to head off trade union activism in remote traditional communities which would have occurred in an award wage environment.
The Whitlam government of 1972 and then the appointment of Charlie Perkins as effectively the first human rights commissioner in 1976 made the politics of equal wages in remote communities a major white idealistic battleground that raged from then on in academia and in the human rights lobby.
The industry of Aboriginal shame and blame was born. CDEP and all that followed was a product of those emotive political times. A patterned approach to economic productivity and community wellbeing was established and entrenched. Nothing has changed. My opinion only.

John Bell Also Commented

CDP work for the dole scheme gets a hammering
When the Whitlam government introduced CDEP in the NT circa 1972, the concept we were sold was that a block of money equivalent to the combined unemployment benefits payable to Community X would be allocated to Community X.
The Community X Council would then get together to create a number of jobs between which the funding would be divided as wages.
The Council would then decide who would be employed in those jobs.
At the time, CDEP was presented as socialism at its finest, with the Community taking control.
As the meerkat lad says in the ad on tellie: “Simples!”
So, 45 years on, what went wrong?


Recent Comments by John Bell

Council may take up slack of the NT government
Advocating council to step in to take a role in the NT government’s debt problem is a double-edged sword.
The danger is that the role of “small government” by local council increasingly blurs the demarcation of powers between elected Parliamentarians whose role is to legislate, and elected councillors whose role is delivery of essential services eg roads maintenance, collection of rates and rubbish collection.
Local councils everywhere are stepping stones for wannabe State and Territory pollies. Local council charter is not meant to be political.


Looks like Wazza’s back
I have been asking Wazza questions of accountability for significant expenditure of Commonwealth grant funds in a charity for the Indigenous Marathon Project for six and a half years now.
As the keeper of public trust for the Aboriginal people of remote tribal communities in Lingiari, Wazza should be transparent.
He should come clean now that he remains the keeper for the next three years.
I would be very happy to get to his electoral office in Alice somehow for a cup of coffee and a couple of simple answers in the public interest.


Anti-fracking Greens: Are jobs for the dole schemes legal?
No discussion about the state of the economy. Neither NT nor national.
The Greens everywhere avoid discussing how to repair and grow Australia’s economy like the plague.


Back to the future with Warren Snowdon
Warren has an unenviable task promoting Labor’s Federal fiscal policies in the Lingiari electorate with the millstone of the Gunner government financial disaster hanging around his neck.
Understandably, he distances Federal Labor from NT Labor with his response to Erwin’s questions: “The NT Government is responsible for any debt it incurs. It has a responsibility to repay it. And it will.”


Price family were sole complainants against Cocking & Satour 
@James T Smerk. There are penalties for vexatious litigants in tribunals and courts. By way of award of costs against the vexatious litigant. I speak from practical experience. However, where the decision maker is simply a departmental committee, there is no jurisdictional power to penalise, to my knowledge.


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