We talk of green, environmentalists, recycling, solar energy etc… but …

Comment on Change on new council: three women, three greens by Evelyne Roullet.

We talk of green, environmentalists, recycling, solar energy etc… but I find interesting that there is no mention of the problem caused by disposable nappies in our landfill. I do not want to offend but I know that new parents being greenies ecologists or other use disposable nappies and keep their children in them much longer than if they were using washable ones.
According to figures released in 2009 by IbisWorld, Australians use around 5.6 million nappies per day. This means that over 2 billion used nappies go into landfill sites in Australia each year. Will this new council go to war on nappies?

Key Environmental Issues:
Despite their modern popularity, the ease of disposable nappies and the sheer volume that we use each year poses significant environmental problems. Manufacturing Impact: Disposable nappies require large volumes of pulp, paper, plastic and other raw materials in the manufacturing process and hence, significant amounts of water and energy are used. This contributes to energy waste and pollution on a large scale and also links to other problems associated with deforestation and non-sustainable sourcing.
Nappy Fact: According to The Good Human, disposable nappies use 3 times more energy, 20 times more raw materials and 2 times more water than reusables during the manufacturing process.
Landfill Problems: Disposable nappies also place a huge strain on landfill sites in Australia. When combined with other absorbent hygiene materials (such as sanitary pads and incontinence pads), this results in around 450,000 tonnes of landfill waste every year and also contributes to notable amounts of carbon emissions.
Decomposition Problems: Many disposable nappies are also not as biodegradable as we assume. Scientists estimate that once nappies end up in a landfill, they can take around 500 years to decompose.
Contamination Issues: When we defecate, our waste goes into the toilet for good reason: It is treated and sanitised before being recycled or put back into our environment. The waste in disposable nappies, on the other hand, goes straight into the bin. As a result, when the nappies are placed into landfill, certain bacteria and viruses are at risk of soaking in to our groundwater and causing subsequent contamination problems
Nappy Fact: If you threw out a disposable nappy anytime this year, it wouldn’t fully decompose until the year 2514.
Read more at: www.australianscience.com.au/environmental-science/disposable-nappies-are-they-stinking-up-our-planet/

Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

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Promises not kept will annul the contract (without pay) and another election could be called.


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@ RM: “However, for Australia as a country to function properly our standards are based and built on Western traditions including the altruistic beliefs of Christianity.
If you don’t like that or don’t believe in that then you can choose to live outback away from the city or even move out of the country.”
This CHRISTIAN (rather unchristian) statement is the proof of the arrogance of the western society who believes they know it all and that the Australian colonialism brought paradise to this land.
Like Alex Gamin I will advise you to read “The Biggest Estate on Earth” and learn a bit about Aborigines and their way of life, especially the land management which was the same accross the country.
I will quote Roslyn Ross: Many different peoples living here in 1788, descended from different waves of migration, without a common language, generally at war with each other, constituted tribes and often barely that given the numbers of some groups, and nothing close to any sort of nations.”
I will quote Bill Gammage: “Accross Australia early Europeans commented again and again that the land looked like a park, open woodlands and abundant wildlife, it evoked a country estate in England.”
Once Aboriginal people were no longer able to tend their country, it became overgrown and vulnerable.
Christian westerners have done a good job.
“When the missionaries came to Africa they had the Bible and we had the land. They said ‘Let us pray.’ We closed our eyes. When we opened them we had the Bible and they had the land.” Desmond Tutu.
The same can be said about Australia.


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