He was interfering with a police operation, he was told …

Comment on Police clash with protestors by Ray.

He was interfering with a police operation, he was told to move as they were trying to effect an arrest, he failed to do so, he was pushed away.
Remember Erwin, this is on Police Rememberance Day. Did you do a story about the Officers who have paid the ultimate price in the NT? Just in case you were wondering, I have found the details for all of them for you.
7 November 1883, Mounted Constable John Shirley, aged 27 years from dehydration while searching for men who had murdered a man at Lawson’s Creek.
1 August 1933, mounted constable Albert Stewart McColl was speared to death at Woodah Island in Arnhem Land.
17 August 1948, Constable Maxwell Gilbert, aged 27 years when the vehicle he was driving overturned just north of Wauchope. He was escorting a prisoner to Alice Springs.
9 June 1952, constable William Bryan Condon was shot twice after confronting a gunman.
16 June 1967, inspector Louis Hook died from extensive injuries from a rollover near Pine Creek.
9 June 1970, sergeant Colin Eckert was killed in a head-on collision in Katherine.
11 December 1981, senior constable Allen Price aged 44 years died of a heart attack while attempting to stop a disturbance in Mataranka.
29 January 1984, detective sergeant Ian Bradford died when the police vehicle he was a passenger in went over the edge of the wharf in Darwin.
3 August 1999, Brevet sergeant Glen Huitson was killed in a gun battle with bushman Rodney Ansell on the Stuart Highway.
[ED> – Hi Ray, thank you for commemorating the heroic police officers who gave their lives in the exercise of their duties. But as for today’s events – you are raising the subject: In what way was the photographer “interfering with a police operation”?]

Ray Also Commented

Police clash with protestors
He was too close to an arrest. It takes a number of officers to do this safely, to control the head of the subject, arms legs etc.
Police need to move around the subject quickly to ensure they are safe during the process. That photographer was too close and impeding the police officers movements as can be clearly seen in the video.
If you are told to move by police, you move. Simple.
It is not up to the public to question the way the coppers do their job.
In the “heat of battle” they do hard jobs that you and many others are not prepared to do. Do not judge them when they are doing their lawful duties. Back away, let them work. Simple.


Recent Comments by Ray

‘Disgust’ at site choices for youth detention facilities
100% James, although I doubt the guards from the adult jail would want to assist following the disgusting way they were treated by the Royal Commission.


Soy sauce now only from a bottlo
I am glad this has all been resolved. It seems the new commissioner was just a bit over zealous.
My initial thoughts were first the BDR, then this, talk about Kikkoman when he’s down!


Cops at bottle shops: expensive bluff?
Good to see some stats from Vicki, the correlation cannot be just coincidence.
As far as profiling goes, excellent.
There already is profiling for jobs in the form of special measure, and as police have said to me personally, if I know the bloke trying to purchase a bottle of Jacks is going to and his wife to hospital, he will do it.
Nice to see coppers who are not afraid to apply common sense.
I bought a carton the other night and was asked for ID, so to say it does not happen is erroneous. Once again, the PALI scheme is working according to the stats.


Anti-fracking Greens: Are jobs for the dole schemes legal?
John Argent: Your arguments have more holes that the rabbit proof fence itself.
If you are quoting that movie as a source of facts you may want to pick a better example.
If you google “holes in the rabbit proof fence” you will find plenty of info on it.
Even the person it is supposed to be about has said: “That’s not my story.”
It’s a bit like saying Jack and Rose were real people and using the movie Titanic to base your story.
As far as the White Australia policy goes, you use that as justification for the Aborigines finding the others in the bush.
You fail to understand the white Australia Policy had absolutely nothing to do with Aboriginal people. It was to do with immigration, pure and simple.
And as far as calling somebody a coconut, it is a racial slur, no matter who uses it.
If you you use it yourself then congratulations, you Sir are a racist, as racism goes both ways and being Aboriginal, African, Asian or any other colour does not give you an exemption.


Anti-fracking Greens: Are jobs for the dole schemes legal?
Unfortunately, Darwin Observer, you are correct in the way it is supposed to work, and in this case would be the Crown (Commonwealth or State) and regulated by either Comcare or Worksafe that is the regulator and responsible for enforcing the NUL WHS Act.
Unfortunately an Aboriginal worker on CDEP had a serious accident with an angle grinder, which he should have had training and instruction in using, yet he was unable to claim compensation as he was not a worker as defined by the Return to Work Act, and neither worksafe nor Comcare have said they are able to prosecute (or don’t want to) due to the way it is structured.
This should be one of the first things they should nut out as part of any planned changes to CDP or CDEP.


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