He was interfering with a police operation, he was told …

Comment on Police clash with protestors by Ray.

He was interfering with a police operation, he was told to move as they were trying to effect an arrest, he failed to do so, he was pushed away.
Remember Erwin, this is on Police Rememberance Day. Did you do a story about the Officers who have paid the ultimate price in the NT? Just in case you were wondering, I have found the details for all of them for you.
7 November 1883, Mounted Constable John Shirley, aged 27 years from dehydration while searching for men who had murdered a man at Lawson’s Creek.
1 August 1933, mounted constable Albert Stewart McColl was speared to death at Woodah Island in Arnhem Land.
17 August 1948, Constable Maxwell Gilbert, aged 27 years when the vehicle he was driving overturned just north of Wauchope. He was escorting a prisoner to Alice Springs.
9 June 1952, constable William Bryan Condon was shot twice after confronting a gunman.
16 June 1967, inspector Louis Hook died from extensive injuries from a rollover near Pine Creek.
9 June 1970, sergeant Colin Eckert was killed in a head-on collision in Katherine.
11 December 1981, senior constable Allen Price aged 44 years died of a heart attack while attempting to stop a disturbance in Mataranka.
29 January 1984, detective sergeant Ian Bradford died when the police vehicle he was a passenger in went over the edge of the wharf in Darwin.
3 August 1999, Brevet sergeant Glen Huitson was killed in a gun battle with bushman Rodney Ansell on the Stuart Highway.
[ED> – Hi Ray, thank you for commemorating the heroic police officers who gave their lives in the exercise of their duties. But as for today’s events – you are raising the subject: In what way was the photographer “interfering with a police operation”?]

Ray Also Commented

Police clash with protestors
He was too close to an arrest. It takes a number of officers to do this safely, to control the head of the subject, arms legs etc.
Police need to move around the subject quickly to ensure they are safe during the process. That photographer was too close and impeding the police officers movements as can be clearly seen in the video.
If you are told to move by police, you move. Simple.
It is not up to the public to question the way the coppers do their job.
In the “heat of battle” they do hard jobs that you and many others are not prepared to do. Do not judge them when they are doing their lawful duties. Back away, let them work. Simple.


Recent Comments by Ray

Film short on answers for trouble in the streets
@ Alex Kelly: “We all know the horrendous human rights injustices and abuses that happen every single minute of every single day in every single sector, whether it be prison, education, health.”
Hi Alex, just wondering if you can provide any evidence at all to back up [this] quote?
I have just spent two days in Alice Springs hospital and seen the wonderful caring staff in action in the paediatric section. I did not see any human rights abuses or breaches there, to Indigenous or other races.
My wife is a teacher and works closely with year three (mainly Indigenous children), many of whom are in care from the abuse and neglect from their own family, and many have faced incredible trauma.
She has been working closely with children like these for over 20 years and is very well respected by her peers and parents of the children.
Many of these children (now adults) still recognise her and say hello in the street, as do the parents of these children.
Can you explain what injustices and abuses occur at her school?
I work with Aboriginal adults and have done so for 17 years. I too have not seen this abuse and injustice “every single minute, every single day”, in fact I have rarely ever seen it, if at all.
I would hope that you would make a public apology or retraction for these comments unless you have evidence.
If you do have evidence, have you reported it?
One of the other interesting points I see on your website is that “children do not belong in custody”.
I tend to agree with that, however I wonder if your foundation (that must be funded quite well by the government) does not seem to make the connection that if 12 year olds are not on the street at 2am, or breaking into houses, or stealing cars, or smashing property, that they would be far less likely to end up before the courts.
Unfortunately, after many diversions, many “second” chances, many “opportunities” they may be placed in custody, as a last resort.
Could you use some of your funding to educate the parents of these children that a safe home will be of benefit?
So it seems you have insulted our wonderful teachers, health staff and others in a quest to portray your movie the way you want.
From many of the comments, the critical review by Alice Springs News, and some of the professionals who have been to a pre-release screening of your film, it seems like you have once again used race to push a narrative, and cause further division in our community. Well done.


Dujuan’s moving story and its missing pieces
Televised violence of prison officers? I think an apology might be in order after that throwaway line. I really hope you mean alleged, and I hope it is not in reference to the image shown on the Four Corners program where the conduct of all involved was investigated and found lawful and reasonable, with no charges being laid or pursued.


Anger with out-of-control kids: council needs to step up
Bloody hell Glenn, you are fearful for the kids? I would have thought your first fear would have been for the ratepayers who vote for you. Crime is crime, regardless of the skin colour.


Man robbed, but wait, there’s so much more on FB
Erwin, the knife was taken off a juvenile offender. If you contact the administrator of the site they can give you the details.
Managers of building sites years ago warned their staff of having a go at the kids at night in the CBD, due to the weapons they carried, such as this.


Curfew: sixth time lucky for Cr Melky?
Seems like it is needed more than ever. I have been here for over 20 years and can’t remember it quite this bad.
I certainly support a curfew, and it can really be made to suit our needs. Even the police at the bottle shops I have chatted to, and other long serving police agree that one is needed. I have never heard this before.
If a kid of a certain age is on the street between 10pm and 6am, “without lawful excuse” (going to or leaving work etc.) the police should have the power to take them to their home, and assess if it is safe in conjunction with a Territory Families worker and if Aboriginal, a Liaison Officer.
If it is deemed safe the parent is warned that if they are caught on the streets again for the next x period of time, they are on the banned drinkers register.
There is enough legislation in existence already that talks about a parent’s responsibility to provide for a child, to be legally responsible for them and to ensure they attend school.
If they are not able to be returned home due to unsafe conditions, that child should / could be taken to an outstation 100km out of town staffed by a member of their own skin group, and put through a program like Rainer Chlanda described in his recent article.
This would keep the kids on country, not in custody.
The parents also need to be told in no uncertain terms what needs to be done, and forced to do it. No matter what this type of program costs, it would have to be more economically viable than the crap going on at the moment.
There seems to be an average of one car stolen every single day, criminal damage to shops every single day, people not driving out to town at night because it is too unsafe.


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