Why shouldn’t Elders be paid for their consultancy work? Any …

Comment on Conflicting stories for Parrtjima’s lights on the hill by Peter.

Why shouldn’t Elders be paid for their consultancy work? Any other person providing professional advice in any other profession would charge a consultancy fee – and a steep one at that! $$. These Elders are constantly humbugged by Government and Organisations in Alice Springs because of their status as key owners and caretakers. Government and Org’s do not see or live the stress these Elders have to deal with that exists in the Aboriginal landscape here. These leaders are torn down and heavily criticised within this community by their own people, and also by Government or non-Aboriginal people who want them to make immediate decisions about events, festivals, land developments etc. This is why even the simplest of decisions about land or development is a major issue.

We should be applauding Apmereke-artweye Benedict Stevens and Kwertengwerles Coco and Felicity for engaging with this highly contentious process.

Recent Comments by Peter

Gunner’s native title deal not what it seems to be
Diverting from politics;
Barrik (Burke) Perkins, Hetti Perkins, Mary Bray, Wallaby Jim Arrwe (no children) and Kari descend from Irlpme Apmere-ke artweye, Nellie Aherrke.
Aherrke is the Northern Arrernte word for ‘Sun’. A Sun Dreaming woman from Irlpalentye (aka Ilbalintja). Wrongly pronounced ‘Araka’.
She was the full sister of Kinto Iloaia and Etaterkarinja (same father, same mother). Kinto’s Iloaia’s son, Maori, had children who originally had the last name ‘Collin’ but one of his daughters was S. Conway, the recognised Apmere-ke artweye for Irlpme. Fabian is her son.
Kinto Iloaia and Etaterkarinja and Nellie Aherrke (all Ngale) were Apmere-ke artweye for Irlpme. Irlpme belongs to Ngale/Ampetyane anyenhenge (father-son).
In short, the Conways are the same family as the Perkins, Bray, Turners, Whites – same line.
The CLC has this information, that was set down decades ago by old men. It should have been cleared up 30 odd years ago by the CLC. Why has it not?


The water is there, but our swamp is dying
It is sad to see the degradation of ankerre-ankerre. Combined with all the other environmental damage and mess around the town.
The community hoped Lhere Artepe would have been more active in the area of protecting and looking after country.
Unfortunately, they’d rather fight over who can speak for what, rather than organise and activate, grab a rake, shovel or fill up a ute to clear the rubbish throughout and look after these once special places.


Horses perish in abandoned Aboriginal outstation
Terrible to see. Outstations were built at a time when desert people still cared about maintaining their culture, heritage, the land of their forefathers, protecting country and sacred sites.
There are a couple of strongholds, but mostly these homelands are “weekend-jobs” at best.
Today outstations are more often bickered over from afar, than maintained by committed, healthy people.
If cultural knowledge and language continues in this decline, the ownership, inheritance and residence of these outstations will be an area to look out for, particularly closer to town.
Where once land was inherited via traditional inheritance, now people with distant claims exercising European style property rights, or knowledge only of English are resident king-pins.


Native title organisation has $3.7m in the bank
Jeff, well pointed out there. Lhere Artepe is not responsible for housing, health, education etc, the relevant Government Departments are responsible for those portfolios.
Often misguided folk like to level blame any Indigenous corporation, or land council when the provision of these services are the responsibility of government. While interstate locales may celebrate progress in Closing the Gap, it’s safe to say our region and the government departments responsible have a long, long way to go.
That said, LAAC could do well to focus on promoting Arrernte language throughout the town including dual place-name signage (updating bad spelling).
They could be lobbying to ensure all Arrernte people have access to learning their language, promoting the historic story of the Arrernte, raising funds to clean up areas of land that are used by Alice Springs residents as white-goods garbage dumps, or “sacred sites” littered with rubbish and covered with buffel grass that would have ancestors turning in their graves.
Further, they could be ensuring key Apmereke-artweye and truely knowledgeable Kwertengwerle are educated and well versed (and taught in Arrernte) the mechanisms of Native Title Law and what their roles and responsibilities are as board members.
Any moneys raised through the sale of land should be solely for community development projects, and no royalty payments should ever be made.
Arrernte people should also have access to the FULL Native Title determination (cough*) and related research to negate the current day needless infighting relating to “who belongs where”, that is often played out in the Alice Sprigs News or Facebook.
The CLC and its anthros should assist with this given they are the current custodians of all records and information relevant to the Native Title Claim.

Given it’s nearly 20 years since LAAC was established, the community deserves to see some positive action and results.


Gunner says fresh talks about gallery at Anzac Hill precinct
Nicole.
Mparntwe does not mean ‘meeting place for ceremony visitors’, lol.

Where does your patriline take you? Why are you speaking about the Peltharre/Kngwarraye anyenhenge of Mparntwe? Don’t you guys come from Penangke/Pengarte ancestors of Ntulye? Which Peltharre/Kngwarraye ancestors do you descend from? There is a reason the Stevens family are apmere-ke artweye, they have an unbroken patriline (no European ancestry) to the Peltharre/Kngwarraye ancestors who inhabited Alice Springs, well before Europeans arrived. Utnerrengatye-ke artweye, Akngwelye-ke artweye.


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