Dear Nicole, A good post, but some corrections. • “The caterpillars are …

Comment on The eternal chase: songlines of the Seven Sisters by Researcher.

Dear Nicole,
A good post, but some corrections.
• “The caterpillars are not the ceremony holders of the Yeperenye Dreaming”.
You’re right. The local estate group for Tjoritja were the Utnerrengatye people.
All are of the Peltharre / Kngwarraye subsection. This (and the boundaries of the Tjoritjarenye people – who numbered about 40 at the start of the 20th century) is well documented in historical records from Spencer and Gillen and then supported by TGH Strehlow some 30 to 40 years later.
The Mparntwe estate is the Tjoritja estate. The researchers were given this information by the original TOs for Alice Springs at the earliest contact times.
• “The Yeperenye Dreaming is the ceremony that won title for the Arrernte people over Alice Springs”.
Alice Springs is Utnerrengatye. As is the main caterpillar dreaming for Anthwerrke (Emily Gap), and into Alice Springs via the caterpillar / dogs story.
Emily Gap nature park has recently been incorrectly renamed “Yeperenye”. Originally Alice Springs was Penangke / Peltharre (four sections of the kin groups) until the early 20th century when the local Arrernte adopted the current eight skin system. Again, this is heavily documented.
• “Mbantua is not a real clan group”.
Mparntwe is a clan group, and is a site name – however it is not near St Philip’s school. Originally however, you are correct in saying this land was Tjoritjarenye and belonged to those people. It is correct that there are three clan groups; Irplme; Ampetyane / Ngale, Tjoritja (Mparntwe); Peltharre Kngwarraye, and Ntulye; Penangke / Pengkarte.
The Ingkarte for Tjoritja was King Charley, aka Irrapmwe Peltharre, at the turn of the 19th century. His Aknganentye site was Ntyarlkele Tyaneme (old judge’s house) which is where he derived his other name, Ntyarlke. He had brothers and sisters are from whom the Tjoritja / Mparntwe people descend from today. His son now has a town camp named after him, Mpwetyerre, (Abbotts camp), which is also a site name near there.
You make some very good points in the rest of your argument regarding how disenfranchised Arrernte people are (TOs of this area, and neighboring).

Researcher Also Commented

The eternal chase: songlines of the Seven Sisters
Very interesting Nicole – obviously you think you are right and have the whole story.
What is absolutely correct is that informants to the researchers, (i.e. the bosses for the corroboree and country you are speaking about) gave those researchers the stories, site names, associated skin names and genealogies for those places.
Are you saying that you know more now in 2018, than the informants of the 1890s – 1920s and 1930s – 1960s did?
While it’s true they didn’t reveal entire stories in some instances, they entrusted the researchers because at the time and due to the pressures of European arrival, culture was under threat.
Those old people showed complete agency in revealing their culture for its survival, and future study and research by those Aboriginal people interested in learning.
I encourage you to keep reading before drawing absolute conclusions.


Recent Comments by Researcher

Gunner’s native title deal not what it seems to be
Diverting from politics;
Barrik (Burke) Perkins, Hetti Perkins, Mary Bray, Wallaby Jim Arrwe (no children) and Kari descend from Irlpme Apmere-ke artweye, Nellie Aherrke.
Aherrke is the Northern Arrernte word for ‘Sun’. A Sun Dreaming woman from Irlpalentye (aka Ilbalintja). Wrongly pronounced ‘Araka’.
She was the full sister of Kinto Iloaia and Etaterkarinja (same father, same mother). Kinto’s Iloaia’s son, Maori, had children who originally had the last name ‘Collin’ but one of his daughters was S. Conway, the recognised Apmere-ke artweye for Irlpme. Fabian is her son.
Kinto Iloaia and Etaterkarinja and Nellie Aherrke (all Ngale) were Apmere-ke artweye for Irlpme. Irlpme belongs to Ngale/Ampetyane anyenhenge (father-son).
In short, the Conways are the same family as the Perkins, Bray, Turners, Whites – same line.
The CLC has this information, that was set down decades ago by old men. It should have been cleared up 30 odd years ago by the CLC. Why has it not?


The water is there, but our swamp is dying
It is sad to see the degradation of ankerre-ankerre. Combined with all the other environmental damage and mess around the town.
The community hoped Lhere Artepe would have been more active in the area of protecting and looking after country.
Unfortunately, they’d rather fight over who can speak for what, rather than organise and activate, grab a rake, shovel or fill up a ute to clear the rubbish throughout and look after these once special places.


Horses perish in abandoned Aboriginal outstation
Terrible to see. Outstations were built at a time when desert people still cared about maintaining their culture, heritage, the land of their forefathers, protecting country and sacred sites.
There are a couple of strongholds, but mostly these homelands are “weekend-jobs” at best.
Today outstations are more often bickered over from afar, than maintained by committed, healthy people.
If cultural knowledge and language continues in this decline, the ownership, inheritance and residence of these outstations will be an area to look out for, particularly closer to town.
Where once land was inherited via traditional inheritance, now people with distant claims exercising European style property rights, or knowledge only of English are resident king-pins.


Native title organisation has $3.7m in the bank
Jeff, well pointed out there. Lhere Artepe is not responsible for housing, health, education etc, the relevant Government Departments are responsible for those portfolios.
Often misguided folk like to level blame any Indigenous corporation, or land council when the provision of these services are the responsibility of government. While interstate locales may celebrate progress in Closing the Gap, it’s safe to say our region and the government departments responsible have a long, long way to go.
That said, LAAC could do well to focus on promoting Arrernte language throughout the town including dual place-name signage (updating bad spelling).
They could be lobbying to ensure all Arrernte people have access to learning their language, promoting the historic story of the Arrernte, raising funds to clean up areas of land that are used by Alice Springs residents as white-goods garbage dumps, or “sacred sites” littered with rubbish and covered with buffel grass that would have ancestors turning in their graves.
Further, they could be ensuring key Apmereke-artweye and truely knowledgeable Kwertengwerle are educated and well versed (and taught in Arrernte) the mechanisms of Native Title Law and what their roles and responsibilities are as board members.
Any moneys raised through the sale of land should be solely for community development projects, and no royalty payments should ever be made.
Arrernte people should also have access to the FULL Native Title determination (cough*) and related research to negate the current day needless infighting relating to “who belongs where”, that is often played out in the Alice Sprigs News or Facebook.
The CLC and its anthros should assist with this given they are the current custodians of all records and information relevant to the Native Title Claim.

Given it’s nearly 20 years since LAAC was established, the community deserves to see some positive action and results.


Gunner says fresh talks about gallery at Anzac Hill precinct
Nicole.
Mparntwe does not mean ‘meeting place for ceremony visitors’, lol.

Where does your patriline take you? Why are you speaking about the Peltharre/Kngwarraye anyenhenge of Mparntwe? Don’t you guys come from Penangke/Pengarte ancestors of Ntulye? Which Peltharre/Kngwarraye ancestors do you descend from? There is a reason the Stevens family are apmere-ke artweye, they have an unbroken patriline (no European ancestry) to the Peltharre/Kngwarraye ancestors who inhabited Alice Springs, well before Europeans arrived. Utnerrengatye-ke artweye, Akngwelye-ke artweye.


Be Sociable, Share!

A new way to support our journalism

We do not have a paywall. If you support our independent journalism you can make a financial contribution by clicking the red button below. This will help us cover expenses and sustain the news service we’ve been providing since 1994, in a locally owned and operated medium.

Erwin Chlanda, Editor