Rampaging kids in the Alice. Rampaging gangs of teenagers “of …

Comment on Rampaging kids: Dale Wakefield drops the ball by John Bell.

Rampaging kids in the Alice. Rampaging gangs of teenagers “of African appearance” across parts of Melbourne.
The latest incidents down here in Mexico are getting pretty frightening. Trashing houses, wielding machetes, dragging old people from their beds and forcing them to hand over valuables.
A lenient juvenile justice system here is soft peddling on repeat offenders who re-offend while on bail in the hope they will be rehabilitated. A constant philosophical battle between advocates of zero tolerance and youth compassion. Hardline or handouts?
Until the debate is resolved, most middle of the road ordinary punters lock their doors and zip their lips for fear of being accused of racism or lacking in cultural diversity tolerance.
It is not a happy situation in the welfare suburbs of Melbourne … or the Alice … for potential victims of growing violence, or indeed for the parents of the young hooligans who are not too many steps away from criminal adulthood. Who has the answer?

Recent Comments by John Bell

Arrernte Mary and Jesus watch over Alice’s Catholics
Returning to Alice every year in the first week of May throughout the late 70s, through the 80s and 90s to 2002, I made it a ritual journey to Our Lady of the Sacred Heart church, to sit up the back late in the afternoon, contemplating.
The late arvo sunset would stream through the stained glass windows, casting amber, red, green shadows down across the pews.
Looking up at the stained glass figures in the silence, contemplating, was serene, peaceful and beautiful.
It never failed, every year. It was a great feeling.
So I’m looking forward to getting back to the Alice once more to sit and contemplate Mrs Wallace’s painting Urtakwerte Atywerrenge Anthurre / Very Sacred Heart.
Thank you, Kathleen. Just wonderful.


Labor, CLP discuss preference swaps: Scott McConnell
@ Stewart Hyway: At Federation there was only one organised major party in the Federal Parliament the Labour Party (later changed in 1913 to the American spelling Labor by its American leader King O’Malley).
The rest of the Parliament consisted of individuals who were never going to have any clout getting legislation passed if Labour was against it.
So after a few years they organised little groups with similar interests, developing gradually to parties with clout.
If we stop voting for the major parties, then two things are sure to happen: We will return initially to an early post-Federation of a parliament of not even one party, and MPs will be running around aimlessly pushing their own individual agenda items.
Nothing getting done.
Then, when it becomes obvious that things are a chookhouse mess, the brighter MPs will put their heads together … and hey presto! Parties are formed once more!
Human nature never changes mate. There is nothing new under the sun … especially in the power mindset of our pollies.


Politicking or community: What to do about youth crime?
@ Ted Egan. I note your comment “The Arranta Elders must be invited to call the shots”.
I accept your long history of very special involvement in the Aboriginal community.
In view of the reality of the current difficult tribal population mix in Alice, how do you propose this invitation should be extended?
By whom?
And how can the Arranta people call the shots in the practical day to day governance of the town?
Do you have a plan to be implemented? I am interested in your views.


Climate: Spreading the word across generations
Has Alice Rotary committed to any specific action as a direct consequence of the students’ presentation?
Are there any plans for a further similar representation at a Rotary dinner or function?


Politicking or community: What to do about youth crime?
@ Ted Egan: Ted, I note with interest your reference to the “Bob Beadman towns” proposed so many years ago.
I first met Bob when I went to work for the National Aboriginal Sports Foundation in Canberra in 1981.
Bob was in Aboriginal Affairs. Bob showed a genuine interest in our work to promote sport for Aboriginal youth.
In 1982 when the NASF held the first ever presentation of Aboriginal national youth sport awards on Channel 7’s Sunday World of Sport in Melbourne on February 14, 1982, Bob was the first to ring us and congratulate Brian Dixon, Syd Jackson and the board.
Then in 1992 Bob was an ATSIC manager who gave evidence in the Castan human rights tribunal case. Bob has certainly been around in Aboriginal youth affairs.


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