@ Evelyne: I, like Laurence, write under a pseudonym due …

Comment on Pack of girls attacked me, says Chinese on working holiday by Ray.

@ Evelyne: I, like Laurence, write under a pseudonym due to where we work.
Erwin knows me, and he certainly understands the implications if I used my real name.
I do however enjoy the opportunity to contribute to community discussion without the fear of disciplinary action taken against me/us, and in the past, I have both agreed with you and shared arguments as well
I do agree that it takes a village to raise a child, as long as we live in a village, where a small number of people all must contribute to ensuring the survival of all.
Many villages in the traditional sense would be no more than 100 people. We are not a village, we are a large town with many different groups, cultures, beliefs, and expectations, and that expression is not relevant to our contemporary way of life.
The problem people like me have with this “throw away” expression is that it deflects responsibility, where people can say: “It’s not my fault, it takes a village to raise a child, so its the fault of the villagers, not me.”
Wrong, you gave the example of how you raised your children, I am raising mine and Dr Who raised his.
The people who helped were not villagers, they were paid professionals offering a service.
The concept of a village implies aunties, uncles, and close-knit members of a small group.
In those days if the kids mucked up, they would be given a clip under the ear by another villager who you knew.
Would you be happy with somebody smacking your child for running amok in Woolies?
Those days of a village are long gone, and the people who have the primary responsibility for raising the child are the parents, nobody else.
Yes, we may use doctors or teachers or police to augment our responsibilities, but the buck stops with the family.
The problem is many of the youths running wild today are from parents who probably were raised in that village environment, out bush on traditional lands, where the kids could run wild.
Unfortunately, the concept of urban drift has occurred, yet the additional responsibility that goes with living in an urban environment is not understood by these parents.
The grandparents probably say: “That’s alright, you used to run around when you were kids” without the understanding that the dangers of today were not there in those days, let alone the propensity to use violence to survive and then thrive on the streets.
My problem is that the euphemism of taking a village to raise a child ignores that fact that village life is far different to life in modern society, and is used as an excuse to abdicate responsibility.

Ray Also Commented

Pack of girls attacked me, says Chinese on working holiday
Would be interesting to see the outcome if Worksafe was contacted about this.
Absolutely the company has a duty to their employees, there should certainly be a policy dealing with the safety of employees departing late at night, especially where the hazards of this town are so well known.
Regardless, the employer has a duty to identify the risk and put controls in place, this would include making the staff finishing their shift aware of the risk to their health and safety by not having suitable transport home, and alternatives if transport was not available.
It could be a journey claim if the worker was traveling directly home at the completion of a shift.
A case in point is the woman attacked by the magpie, losing her eye on her way to work.
A joint responsibility between the employer and the shopping center, especially as the hazard had previously been identified.
There are additional duties imposed if it involves young or inexperienced workers.


Recent Comments by Ray

‘Disgust’ at site choices for youth detention facilities
100% James, although I doubt the guards from the adult jail would want to assist following the disgusting way they were treated by the Royal Commission.


Soy sauce now only from a bottlo
I am glad this has all been resolved. It seems the new commissioner was just a bit over zealous.
My initial thoughts were first the BDR, then this, talk about Kikkoman when he’s down!


Cops at bottle shops: expensive bluff?
Good to see some stats from Vicki, the correlation cannot be just coincidence.
As far as profiling goes, excellent.
There already is profiling for jobs in the form of special measure, and as police have said to me personally, if I know the bloke trying to purchase a bottle of Jacks is going to and his wife to hospital, he will do it.
Nice to see coppers who are not afraid to apply common sense.
I bought a carton the other night and was asked for ID, so to say it does not happen is erroneous. Once again, the PALI scheme is working according to the stats.


Anti-fracking Greens: Are jobs for the dole schemes legal?
John Argent: Your arguments have more holes that the rabbit proof fence itself.
If you are quoting that movie as a source of facts you may want to pick a better example.
If you google “holes in the rabbit proof fence” you will find plenty of info on it.
Even the person it is supposed to be about has said: “That’s not my story.”
It’s a bit like saying Jack and Rose were real people and using the movie Titanic to base your story.
As far as the White Australia policy goes, you use that as justification for the Aborigines finding the others in the bush.
You fail to understand the white Australia Policy had absolutely nothing to do with Aboriginal people. It was to do with immigration, pure and simple.
And as far as calling somebody a coconut, it is a racial slur, no matter who uses it.
If you you use it yourself then congratulations, you Sir are a racist, as racism goes both ways and being Aboriginal, African, Asian or any other colour does not give you an exemption.


Anti-fracking Greens: Are jobs for the dole schemes legal?
Unfortunately, Darwin Observer, you are correct in the way it is supposed to work, and in this case would be the Crown (Commonwealth or State) and regulated by either Comcare or Worksafe that is the regulator and responsible for enforcing the NUL WHS Act.
Unfortunately an Aboriginal worker on CDEP had a serious accident with an angle grinder, which he should have had training and instruction in using, yet he was unable to claim compensation as he was not a worker as defined by the Return to Work Act, and neither worksafe nor Comcare have said they are able to prosecute (or don’t want to) due to the way it is structured.
This should be one of the first things they should nut out as part of any planned changes to CDP or CDEP.


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