This is a brilliant article, Rainer, a valuable contribution to …

Comment on Youth crisis: broken window of tolerance by Alex Nelson.

This is a brilliant article, Rainer, a valuable contribution to public discourse that will stand the test of time.
Much of what you have written has been observed before, and much of what you describe is instantly recognisable from the time of my own childhood here in Alice Springs.
However, when I was young there was a sense of the corner having been turned when the NT achieved Self-government and there was great hope for the future. Things were about to change for the better for everyone.
I feel a sense of deep disappointment combined with great anger that nothing has improved for so many people in the Territory, and generation after generation of young people born here find themselves “coping” in life conditions no better – and, in many cases, far worse – than the supposedly “bad old days” of Commonwealth control.
It’s equally profoundly disappointing that the energy and intellect of young people such as yourself, Rainer, are left to pick up the pieces of a failed legacy of earlier generations.
But it’s wonderful that you are doing so, and that’s why hope survives.

Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Government grant for Todd Tavern, Alice Plaza development
OK, so now let’s understand this situation a little more fully.
The Todd Tavern, notwithstanding its distinct architectural value, has for decades been a major source of the grog strife and associated anti-social and crime problems of Alice Springs.
This hotel has long been a major cause of why people don’t venture much into the north end of Todd Street and Mall for many years.
The Alice Plaza (originally Ford Plaza) is the town’s great white elephant – from the time it commenced operation it has been effectively subsidised by taxpayers who, through a range of Commonwealth and (mostly) NT Government agencies, have paid rent on most of the upper level and (at times) for retail space on the ground floor, too (PowerWater, for example).
Despite the massive taxpayer support this building has received for three decades, and no less than four major redesigns over that period, the Alice Plaza has never been a successful development.
When the Alice Plaza’s construction was underway in 1986, the building’s architect declared “the new full mall for Todd Street and the Ford Plaza will be an asset for tourism in Alice Springs” (Develop or die, Centralian Advocate, 18/7/86).
The building’s various owners, the NT Government and the Alice Springs Town Council have been struggling to make this massive miscalculation succeed ever since.
There is no evidence whatsoever that either government (at both tiers) or the commerce sector have any idea – let alone expertise – to rectify their colossal blunders.
They just keep coming up with more hare-brained schemes and projects to throw more taxpayers’ dollars at, always with the promise these “investments” will lead to pots of gold at the end of a rainbow and we’ll all live happily ever after.
No major project undertaken during the history of NT Self-Government, either here in Alice Springs or the Territory as a whole, has come anywhere within cooee of such siren promises.
Rather, we’re going backwards and the pace is worsening.
However, the property holders continue to do nicely out of being endlessly funded at public expense, regardless of which major political party holds power in the Northern Territory.
And now we’ve got a Labor Government spending more taxpayers’ dollars for the benefit of the wealthiest hoi polloi of our town to help them get out of the mess of their own making.
Never has so much been paid by so many to so few in the history of Alice Springs.
This is what “responsible Self-Government” has come to mean, and it is a disaster.
Let the wealthy property holders finance their own solutions, they should not be continued to be propped up at public expense.
Let the wealthy property holders face the responsibilities and consequences of their own poor investment decisions; and should they go under – well, that’s the reality of free market forces.
It is not the duty of government to endlessly spend scarce public funds to save the rich and privileged from themselves.
It’s long past the time when this situation should be called out for what it is – enough is enough.


Now that the Rock can’t be climbed, visiting it will cost more
@ Charlie Carter (Posted November 7, 2019 at 10:09 am): Presumably referring to Clyde Holding, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs (1983-87) in the Hawke Government.
Holding was the architect of a proposed national Aboriginal land rights act but this was kyboshed after a strong campaign by the WA mining industry and Labor Premier, Brian Burke.
Instead, a bit under a decade later, the High Court of Australia recognised Native Title as legal.


Another nail in the Anzac High coffin
What this whole exercise starkly reveals is that the entire system of government in the Northern Territory – bureaucracy and the law – is a preserve of the wealthy, privileged and powerful of our society, irrespective of which political party holds power.
As I have stated now for decades, the NT is a shamocracy, not a democracy.
Heritage is the Achilles Heel of this inherently corrupt system because it has long been regarded as an annoyance of no great consequence in the overall scheme of things.
In my recent post comparing the track records of NT Labor and the CLP towards heritage issues (https://www.alicespringsnews.com.au/2019/10/10/how-do-nt-labor-and-the-clp-rate-on-heritage/) it’s clear that the situation is only worsening over time.
What’s happening with heritage is reflective of a much wider malaise afflicting all aspects of public administration (and thus the economy) in the Northern Territory – this is not just about heritage alone.
We find ourselves have become the real embodiment of a dystopian nightmare.
The final sentence of George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” is apt: “The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again but already it was impossible to say which was which”.
(See my comment https://theconversation.com/labors-reset-on-climate-and-jobs-is-a-political-mirage-126013#comment_2056427).


Another nail in the Anzac High coffin
I would like to thank all those who took the time to attend the second directions hearing of the NTCAT.
Everyone came of their own volition, and your support is most appreciated.


Anzac High: No plans yet for what will replace it
“Clearly, we think the Anzac Oval site is the best site for the national indigenous art gallery project,” says Minister Dale Wakefield, yet there is no answer to the question why.
More pertinently, is the real question who was it that persuaded the NT Government that the Anzac Oval site is best for the National Aboriginal Art Gallery?
Maybe a prominent person in local government?
Perhaps there are more twists to this tale than has been revealed to date, and not everything is as it seems as portrayed in the media.
The question is straight-forward and the answer is simple – yes or no?
Secrets are whispering.


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