@ Russell Guy. 2/2 of us found your double negative …

Comment on 1968, when revolution was everybody’s business by Charlie Carter.

@ Russell Guy. 2/2 of us found your double negative confusing.
It was me that used the term double negative not John.
Your contention: “You didn’t mention The Beatles, but the activism of the period was as much based on their songs as anything else” is ludicrous.
“Love and peace, two key words in the activist agenda.”
Er, not in my experience of the time. They may have been mantras of the flower fringe, but those of us on the front line were a bit more realistic.
“I’m not trying to buy an argument.”
Yes, Russell you are, and hanging it on a tendentious misrepresentation of of my position.
“Abortion (on demand) … and … a legacy of seven days per week take away alcohol among its liberal attitude to social policy.
I said nothing about either, but I suggest that the attempted prohibition of both produced worse outcomes.
My positions on the social and political issues of the time were based on respect for human rights, and a realistic analysis of geopolitics.
“American exceptionalism” is bullshit.
The “domino theory” was bullshit.
Sergeant Peppers was a favourite album of mine at the time, but Dylan, Redgum, Chisel, and Bogle were more to the point.

Charlie Carter Also Commented

1968, when revolution was everybody’s business
@ Russell: My piece was, and was intended to be a personal memoir.
Erwin said keep it tight. I tried to.
I concentrated on Aboriginal Rights, anti war and conscription, the environment, and sexual liberation.
Of course I was aware of, and involved in the peace and love thing to some extent, but it was not a priority.
Erwin chose to illustrate the piece with a picture of the Beatles. That was not my decision, or my focus.
Your initial comment included “Love is All You Need humanist fairy story”.
I understand that you have a religious perspective, and were responding to my “supernatural fairy story” comment.
But the love is all you need story was not in my piece. I consider that tendentious.
Also you wrote “You didn’t mention the Vietnam War either”.
I wrote two paragraphs on the Vietnam war.
You have sprayed your comments over a wide field, and seem to attribute everything you dislike to
“the moral relativism of the front line revolutionaries”.
I’m not sure what you mean by that, but our stance that conscription was wrong, and that the Vietnam war was immoral, geopolitically stupid, and based on lies was not relativism.
I also had to register for the ballot for National Service.
The Vietnam war was lost.
The Dominos have not fallen.
The “yellow peril” has not overrun Australia.
I could go on.
But, you say,”I’m more interested in postmodern analysis of that legacy”.
Go for it, but leave me out.


1968, when revolution was everybody’s business
I appreciate your interest Russell, but the double negative confuses your meaning, and I’m not sure what it is.
I didn’t mention the Beatles, and the activism of the period was not based on Beatles songs.
My humanism is based on scientific methodology and rational thought.


Recent Comments by Charlie Carter

Shooting, not selling feral camels
Ah, the same old utopian dreams. If it was economic someone would be doing it.
It is not!
Reflect for just a minute on the costs associated with taking vehicles and equipment to remote trackless areas where the camels are.
Then killing, butchering to health standards, refrigerating the meat, and getting it to market. It just don’t add up.


Gas and solar: Still uneasy bedfellows
I suggest the problem is not the aim of 50% renewable, but the clinging to the 50% gas.
The technology is available to handle the renewables, it just needs the commitment and money from the government which is in the position of trying to cope with the Giles Government’s stupid purchase of the new gas generators.


Now that the Rock can’t be climbed, visiting it will cost more
What on earth is John Bell talking about? Something that did not happen in 1983?
Anangu didn’t have ownership of the land then.
If the “Charlie” referred to is me, I wasn’t in the NT then, and have never had any role in the management of the park.
Who the hell is Clyde?


Now that the Rock can’t be climbed, visiting it will cost more
Trevor: I have been a guide at Uluru Kata Tjuta NP. In answer to your specious query, may I suggest;
1. Yes, walk around the rock, slowly.
2. Walk into Walpa Gorge, then watch the sunset at Kata Tjuta (and have an evening picnic).
3. Walk the full Valley of the Winds walk.
4. Spend a few hours in the cultural centre.
5. And yes, you’d probably want to see the sunset on Uluru.


The Territory: It’s a gas!
Gas is well (pun intended) on the way to being a stranded asset.
It is not “clean”.
It will survive as an interim back up fuel for a short while.
See the analysis.


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