@ Kumara :”Please give some respect to Aunty Doreen. While …

Comment on 24/7 youth centre: bridge between us and them? by Evelyne Roullet.

@ Kumara :”Please give some respect to Aunty Doreen. While Im sure she wasnt’ waiting for a ‘personal invitation’ why couldn’t someone give her a call”.
Aunty Doreen is a Luritja / Western Arrente grandmother our councillor Jacinta Price who looks after Aborigines’s issues, could have given her a call.
Personally I called some of my friends, but they were all gone to The Top End for the memorandum of understanding (MOU) signed at Barunga Festival in the Aboriginal community of Barunga. But they are very interested in the project.

Evelyne Roullet Also Commented

24/7 youth centre: bridge between us and them?
Once again thank you Kieran for an excellent report, and thank you Janet, Steve and Wayne to their tremendous work.
It was very disappointing to see that once again the project has been turned around to Aborigines like if they were the only children in town in need of a safe place to go night time.
Doreen Carrol has all my admiration, but I would like her to tell us if she will be caring for children of different ethnicity, and why the Aboriginal grandmothers never invite the grandmothers of the town to their meetings.
In the 70s mothers and grandmothers used to talked about children behaviour, but that was before all those different organisations were created. Doreen should be on the committee to represent the needs of her community, but not the only one.
I also had the feelings that some speakers forget what was the aims of THIS WAY: “Welcome kids in, welcome their freedom to use the space how they will, with adult supervision.”
And were more concerned about their positions Quote: “Mr Walder continued. Working with trauma affected children is very specialised, he said. Work needs to be from a trauma-based lens, otherwise it is just a bunch of activities.”
I would have like to be able to ask him if those traumatised children were getting help on the streets at all hours of the nights.
Some speakers insisted the children should have been invited to the meeting.Invited to what? to ask them what they want? What would happen then if we do not get premises for the drop-in centre? More hope and more let down?
No one asked: “Do you love children, would you care for even the most difficult ones? I feel this is the most important requirement, followed by the love of our community – with an ochre card, naturally.”


Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

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It is a wrong statement because everything is changing in the NT, but alas not for the best.


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Karen, you are prompt in judging others. I am one of the ones you judge to be excessively soft-heart or liberal. Bleeding heart is in fact informal but derogatory.
May be those “bleeding hearts” would love to look after “these children” if rules and regulations were not impeding the process.
The ones who know me will tell you that I am not soft, to the contrary, but have learned that you can be strict with a loving heart.
May I ask you if you were a goody goody two shoes when you were a teenager?


Youth crime: compassion alone is no solution
Regardless of whether or not our desires are the “right thing,” the act of inflicting punishment always creates an “us vs. them” rift between adult and child, and we are dealing with children.
When we punish, we reduce a child’s ability to focus on another’s experience and be accountable. These are the roots of empathy and compassion, which are the precursor to healthy relationships and a well-functioning society.
Punishment always brings the focus of the punished onto themselves. One cannot think of others, acknowledge wrongdoing, or aim to make amends while being made to suffer.
We have to ask ourselves if prison is effective as a punishment and deterrent for juveniles, or does it harden a young person who might otherwise recover?
Research on adolescent brain development does not provide an excuse for culpability, but it shows that youth are amenable to treatment in ways that adults are not. Additionally, given what we know about the development of the adolescent brain, how it processes risks and rewards, deterrence through the threat of incarceration is likewise ineffective at controlling the behavior of youth. Therefore, prison is never an effective punishment for youth.
The challenge, then, is two-fold: to find ways to make punishment more effective and to tackle the causes of offending through high-quality rehabilitation.
The origins of offender rehabilitation in Australia can be traced back to the early penal colonies and, in particular, to the work of Alexander Maconochie, a prison governor on Norfolk Island in 1840. Maconochie introduced the idea of indeterminate rather than fixed sentences, implemented a system of rehabilitation in which good behaviour counted towards prisoners’ early release, and advocated a system of aftercare and community resettlement
In my opinion juvenile prison should be more like a boarding houses with house parents looking after the welfare of different age groups and certainly not close to an adults detention centre.


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Cr Bank and Cr Melky, who do not agree, should not attend the meetings and the public will know who is betraying our trust.


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Just a minute, I ask myself, did you not protest in Africa against apartheid? Do you not hear day after day we have to close the gap?
So what are you doing in a country that is becoming like South Africa?
Legal aid for Indigenous only! Health clinics for Indigenous only! And, now a university for Indigenous only! The gap is becoming wider and will never close.


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