@ The Bush Engineer (Posted August 7, 2018 at 10:30 …

Comment on No ‘mitigation’ of major dust hazard for road users by Alex Nelson.

@ The Bush Engineer (Posted August 7, 2018 at 10:30 am) might like to have the courage of his/her convictions and come out of hiding from behind your psuedonym.
What we’ve got in this situation is a case of massive over-engineering, a sledgehammer to crack a nut. Kilgariff is situated on a higher level of ground to the adjacent St Mary’s Creek channel and all that is (was) required was to run smaller channels from the streets and kerbsides towards the lower area.
What we’ve now ended up with is a situation that will create a knock-on effect, increasing the likelihood and frequency of increased water flow over Colonel Rose Drive which in turn will necessitate extra engineering works to mitigate that situation, too.
But hey! That’s the name of the game, isn’t it? To keep those taxpayers’ dollars flowing to prop up private enterprise – all that rich white fella welfare disguised as keeping the economy going! That’s the way it’s always been done here in the Territory, especially since Self-Government!
Let’s remember Kilgariff only proceeded after 2009 in order to circumvent native title issues in and around the main town area.
Prior to that it had always been official government policy (both Commonwealth era and during the long reign of CLP government 1974-2001) never to develop suburbia south of the Gap.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

No ‘mitigation’ of major dust hazard for road users
Most interesting comment from Melissa (Posted August 7, 2018 at 2:09 pm) because, if her observation is correct, it indicates the layout of streets and drainage in Kilgariff has been very poorly designed.
That area previously simply did not get inundated, even in heavy rainfall events – the water simply soaked into the ground or drained naturally towards St Mary’s Creek.
If “the existing drains filled near to capacity on relatively light rains” then that is an indictment on the standard of work allowed to pass acceptance for this new suburb.
It would seem this whole development is more scandalous than I first realised.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Pine Gap: The link Alice has to Trump’s betrayal of the Kurds
I cannot help wondering if history is turning full circle – certainly too many of us in the West seem to be forgetful of the fundamental principles that are foundational to democratic societies.
As far as the United States is concerned, the preamble of The Declaration of Independence (probably the most influential document in history) is well worth contemplating: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.
That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”
These words drafted by Thomas Jefferson nearly two-and-a-half centuries ago seem to resonate powerfully for our times.


Boyer Lectures aim to reignite recognition debate
It’s interesting to note Rachel Perkins’s Boyer Lecture series will occur in the same year of the passing of former Prime Minister Bob Hawke, who in turn gave the Boyer Lectures 40 years ago (1979) when he was still the president of the ACTU.
Amongst several topics covered by the theme The Resolution of Conflict, Hawke advocated for the abolition of states and territories in Australia, describing them as a “dangerous anachronism” that “is hurting Australians every day of every week”.
He also pointed out that Australia is “the most over-governed country in the world”.
That view certainly wasn’t shared in the Northern Territory at the time, one year after gaining “responsible self-government” under the leadership of Chief Minister Paul Everingham.
Yet one decade ago, on the occasion of Territory Day in 2009, Paul Everingham himself “came out” declaring the states and territories should be abolished.
The call for a First Nations voice in (Federal) Parliament comes at a time when surely there is cause to consider the whole structure of governance and administration in Australia.
There must surely be a better way than the current model.


How do NT Labor and the CLP rate on heritage?
@ Domenico Pecorari (Posted October 11, 2019 at 11:25 am): Concurrent with this period of disregard for heritage, Domenico, is the steady decline of our local economy.
It’s not a coincidence.


Old visitors centre trashed
The repurposed building displaying its current very distinctive architecture was officially opened by NT Federal member Nick Dondas on February 6, 1998 as the new you beaut Visitor Centre and headquarters of the Central Australian Tourism Industry Association (CATIA).
The major modification of the former “Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Welfare Centre” (more commonly known as the Infant Welfare Clinic or Baby Clinic) as a visitor centre cost $260,000 of Federal funding.
Now this public asset is abandoned, trashed and boarded up.
Your taxes at work, yes?


Old visitors centre trashed
@ James T Smerk (Posted October 9, 2019 at 1:04 pm): Yes, it’s been vacant since 2013 – see my story.


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