The battle to fall over ones feet in the race …

Comment on How much of our relationship with Aborigines is hypocrisy? by Local 1.

The battle to fall over ones feet in the race to show how much Australia respects it’s Aboriginal people is nauseating to me, and obviously also to Mr Baranski.
The Welcome to Country ceremonies that are no more than tokenistic gestures for tourists are everywhere and are unfortunately portrayed as a long held traditional cultural ceremony, when in fact they were invented in 1984 in part by Ernie Dingo.
The Aboriginal people in suits nod along when our so called leaders play this game and the fee of sometimes thousands of dollars is paid.
Sadly it makes no difference at all to the lives of the traditional Aboriginal people who struggle to successfully integrate with our modern society.
Same with the divisive acknowledgment of country where we humble pay respect to Aboriginal elders or leaders past, present and in a crystal ball moment, those of the future as well.
They fail to mention anything about the hard work, determination, resourcefulness and hardships endured by the pioneers and explorers that made the country what it is today, failing to mention them is blatant hypocricy and once again there seems to be no real advantage for the bush Aboriginie who should somehow appear greatful they live in the town that boasts one of the biggest renal dialysis facilities in the southern hemisphere.
So much rhetoric and time is spent on issues of the past so the politicians and handwringers feel good they have paid respects, but how many of them, or these tour guides have sat down with real traditional people and understood that they really don’t care to much for tokenistic gestures, because they do nothing for them.
On the surface in the big cities with all the billboards about Aboriginal history, place names, tribal groups makes it seem that all is well, then people see what is really like for the traditional Aboriginal, as opposed to those of mixed heritage.
I quite often attend sporting events and occasionally officiate at them, and to look out at the crowd to see black and white sitting together shoulder to shoulder demonstrates that this is probably one of the least racist towns I have lived in.
Many social outings in this town have a lot of blacks and whites just mixing as workmates, team mates of simply as friends.
Unfortunately the current political PC rubbish is causing more of a divide than anything.
I just wish they would forget their apologist ideals and self flagellation, and accept that we all make up this country, and we should give understanding and respect to everyone that lives here, not hold up one as more important, or more deserving of acknowlegement than the other.

Recent Comments by Local 1

Do film’s omissions mislead viewers on school’s record?
Thank you Kieran for following this up.
Unfortunately it is missing a lot of info and certainly portrays a particular point of view, as did Utopia by John Pilger and the Four Corners report of youth detentions.
It is not so much what is said, but what is not.
There are a number of unsubstantiated quotes I have seen in relation to this report that are certainly not balanced or entirely truthful.
I am glad that you have chased this up, especially for the sake of the wonderful work the Sadadeen staff do.


Camel Cup called off
Arunta Man: You may have the wrong event. There is no “new arrival” from interstate. The Camel Cup is an iconic event that has been run by the APEX club for many years.
The APEX club is made up entirely of volunteers and the club that runs this event has been active since 1972 from memory, and the only one of three remaining APEX Clubs in Central Australia.
As a past president of this club I can vouch for the tireless work this club has done over the years and the positive contribution it makes to our community.
If the club has had to postpone this event, there is a very good reason, and I will support the decision of their executive and members, as it is not a decision taken lightly.
APEX is a wonderful organisation for a person to be involved in, as it develops important life skills, and prides itself on altruistic service and giving back to the community.
Why do you not enquire about joining, they could always use more volunteers.


Film short on answers for trouble in the streets
@ Alex Kelly: “We all know the horrendous human rights injustices and abuses that happen every single minute of every single day in every single sector, whether it be prison, education, health.”
Hi Alex, just wondering if you can provide any evidence at all to back up [this] quote?
I have just spent two days in Alice Springs hospital and seen the wonderful caring staff in action in the paediatric section. I did not see any human rights abuses or breaches there, to Indigenous or other races.
My wife is a teacher and works closely with year three (mainly Indigenous children), many of whom are in care from the abuse and neglect from their own family, and many have faced incredible trauma.
She has been working closely with children like these for over 20 years and is very well respected by her peers and parents of the children.
Many of these children (now adults) still recognise her and say hello in the street, as do the parents of these children.
Can you explain what injustices and abuses occur at her school?
I work with Aboriginal adults and have done so for 17 years. I too have not seen this abuse and injustice “every single minute, every single day”, in fact I have rarely ever seen it, if at all.
I would hope that you would make a public apology or retraction for these comments unless you have evidence.
If you do have evidence, have you reported it?
One of the other interesting points I see on your website is that “children do not belong in custody”.
I tend to agree with that, however I wonder if your foundation (that must be funded quite well by the government) does not seem to make the connection that if 12 year olds are not on the street at 2am, or breaking into houses, or stealing cars, or smashing property, that they would be far less likely to end up before the courts.
Unfortunately, after many diversions, many “second” chances, many “opportunities” they may be placed in custody, as a last resort.
Could you use some of your funding to educate the parents of these children that a safe home will be of benefit?
So it seems you have insulted our wonderful teachers, health staff and others in a quest to portray your movie the way you want.
From many of the comments, the critical review by Alice Springs News, and some of the professionals who have been to a pre-release screening of your film, it seems like you have once again used race to push a narrative, and cause further division in our community. Well done.


Dujuan’s moving story and its missing pieces
Televised violence of prison officers? I think an apology might be in order after that throwaway line. I really hope you mean alleged, and I hope it is not in reference to the image shown on the Four Corners program where the conduct of all involved was investigated and found lawful and reasonable, with no charges being laid or pursued.


Anger with out-of-control kids: council needs to step up
Bloody hell Glenn, you are fearful for the kids? I would have thought your first fear would have been for the ratepayers who vote for you. Crime is crime, regardless of the skin colour.


Be Sociable, Share!

A new way to support our journalism

We do not have a paywall. If you support our independent journalism you can make a financial contribution by clicking the red button below. This will help us cover expenses and sustain the news service we’ve been providing since 1994, in a locally owned and operated medium.

Erwin Chlanda, Editor