@ John Bell (Posted December 1, 2018 at 8:21 am): …

Comment on 1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley by Alex Nelson.

@ John Bell (Posted December 1, 2018 at 8:21 am): It’s worth recalling that the ACT had a referendum on the question of self-government in 1978 but almost two-thirds of the electors voted against it, preferring instead to maintain the arrangement of a House of Assembly which was simply an advisory body to the Department of the Capital Territory.
Notwithstanding that result, a decade later the ACT got self-government irrespective of whether anyone agreeed to it or not.
@ Psuedo Guru (Posted November 30, 2018 at 8:09 am): Your comment may be much closer to the mark than anyone realises.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
@ John Bell (Posted December 3, 2018 at 2:49 pm): I don’t agree with you this time, John.
Here’s part of a comment I’ve made on another media website: “A lot of food for thought from this post. My earliest recollections of politics dates from the dying days of the McMahon Government which, ironically perhaps, was a time of great progress and optimism in the Northern Territory. It capped a time of extraordinary economic and population growth in the NT from the late 1960s onwards (when McMahon was the federal Treasurer), notwithstanding the contemporary mythology now of several decades standing (justifying NT Self-government) that this was the “bad old days” of Commonwealth control and mismanagement”.
@ Edan Baxter (Posted December 3, 2018 at 11:05 am): I have a quote for you, too: “As you say, the agreement made on 7 December 1907 between the Commonwealth and South Australia for the surrender of the Northern Territory to the Commonwealth is still in force” (Letter from NT Attorney-General, Daryl W. Manzie, 26 May, 1992). This still remains the case.
Incidentally, it was this letter from Daryl Manzie that first triggered my interest in Territory history; and what I realised after some time back then is that all is not well with the legal basis of self-government of the NT.
Hence my allusion to section 44 of the Australian Constitution and pointing out the Statute of Limitations does not apply to constitutional law in a recent comment: https://www.alicespringsnews.com.au/2018/11/20/code-of-conduct-allegations-vexatious-frivolous-councillor/#comment-1802265


1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
@ John Bell (Posted December 2, 2018 at 11:13 pm): Entirely agree with you, John, except for your final sentence. It’s an old line that the NT’s “exceptional” circumstances of population and geography justify self-government.
After 40 years there is more than abundant evidence demonstrating that the criticisms you direct at the ACT apply equally well to the NT.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

How do NT Labor and the CLP rate on heritage?
@ Domenico Pecorari (Posted October 11, 2019 at 11:25 am): Concurrent with this period of disregard for heritage, Domenico, is the steady decline of our local economy.
It’s not a coincidence.


Old visitors centre trashed
The repurposed building displaying its current very distinctive architecture was officially opened by NT Federal member Nick Dondas on February 6, 1998 as the new you beaut Visitor Centre and headquarters of the Central Australian Tourism Industry Association (CATIA).
The major modification of the former “Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Welfare Centre” (more commonly known as the Infant Welfare Clinic or Baby Clinic) as a visitor centre cost $260,000 of Federal funding.
Now this public asset is abandoned, trashed and boarded up.
Your taxes at work, yes?


Old visitors centre trashed
@ James T Smerk (Posted October 9, 2019 at 1:04 pm): Yes, it’s been vacant since 2013 – see my story.


Government electricity firm in trouble as solar booms
The rise of renewables supplanting the old fossil-fuelled energy technologies echoes the period almost a century ago when camel trains and droving on horseback gave way to rail and motor transport.
The mind boggles, all the same, at the prospect of feral gas generators roaming the outback with mobs of camels, horses and donkeys.


Council backflip on Anzac Oval heritage
@ Eli Melky (Posted October 4, 2019 at 11:35 am): I acknowledge Councillor Melky’s long-standing support for the preservation of Anzac Oval in its existing state as a major community asset which predates the beginning of my effort towards nominating the oval for heritage listing.
I also thank Councillor Auricht for his principled stand on this matter.
As for Councillor Satour’s querying “that the proposal for heritage listing had not come up until the Anzac precinct became the government’s preferred site for the national Aboriginal art gallery”, she ought to be aware that often happens in regard to proposed redevelopment projects.
It’s not unusual (the recent failed nomination of the old Darwin Primary School at Frog Hollow is another example) and it’s also the right of any person under the NT Heritage Act (passed by Labor in 2011) to make such nominations.
After the conclusion of the mid-September committee meeting I spoke with Councillor Satour to suggest I could make a presentation to the Town Council about the nominations for heritage listing of Anzac Oval and the old school, given that the council had not sought to discuss these matters with me.
Councillor Satour seemed responsive to that idea but there was no follow-up.
I became concerned about heritage implications after learning in late 2017 of the Government’s intention to replace the former Anzac Hill High School as its preferred site for the National Aboriginal Art Gallery, and upon being informed this had not been taken into consideration I resolved at that time to nominate the old school for heritage listing.
The decision to nominate Anzac Oval came much later, after being prevailed upon by others to do so.
In December 2017 I wrote to Minister Lauren Moss explaining the historical background to the origin of heritage legislation in the Northern Territory which arose out of major controversies in Alice Springs in the late 1980s – clearly this message was lost on the Minister and her Parliamentary colleagues.


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