James, I suspect that remote community infrastructure does add to …

Comment on The financial crisis in the Northern Territory by Ralph.

James, I suspect that remote community infrastructure does add to the NT’s revenue stream, as it always has. Case in point (admittedly dated):
Federal grant of $500,000 for remote preschool.
NT admin tax $250,000.
Old asbestos clad science block sent to the community (instead of dumping it}.
Over the next three months, Alice Springs tradies renovate the building.
There is no money left for painting so that becomes a school expense.
Darwin designed building has no security so is broken into and trashed, then closed for six months as the school tries to get it repaired.
So the NT Government gets a windfall profit, Alice Springs businesses do well and the community gets a high maintenance asbestos building.

Recent Comments by Ralph

Locked in senior: Daughter speaks out
I assume the 2019 image is meant to convey the message that Alan has lost the capacity to conduct his own affairs, make decisions for himself or possess his own money and assets.
In my opinion the photo does none of this and I find other evidence to the contrary far more compelling.
Elderly who have lost capacity do not usually oppose the sale of their property nor give lucid accounts of their circumstances.
Loss of capacity is usually caused by advanced dementia to which the elderly person has surrendered.
In my opinion Lisa Wilson needs a psychiatric examination to check the validity of her claims about her father.


Little progress with $64m management system for trouble kids
@ Local 1: A management system almost the same as IOMS had already been developed and was operational in Queensland.
It could have been reprogrammed for peanuts.
But no! A new IOMS had to be built to match exact NT needs.
Our IOMS never matched those needs and the cost was extraordinary.
And yes our IOMS could be adapted now but it won’t be.
Nothing will distract from the political mileage gained through this new system.
And it will do everything.
Youth crime will plummet once we have it operational.
The massive cost will be justified by political spin for the next election.


Little progress with $64m management system for trouble kids
These management systems are outsourced to Indian IT companies.


Little progress with $64m management system for trouble kids
Information management systems with magical capabilities have an unfortunate history in the NT.
The need for them emerges when governments have run out of solutions to major problems.
This one is claimed to “get young people out of the cycle of crime”.
Similarly IMOS was designed to break the cycle of recidivism and reduce the numbers of prisoners in our jails.
IMOS took twice as long to make and cost more than twice its original budget.
It was a near useless system, mismatched to on the ground realities and the needs of Corrections staff.
For political reasons it was never used to research which programs actually worked in reducing recidivism.
This case management system will also blow out in cost and will not break the cycle of crime.
But with no answers it is timely, even if useless and yet more expenditure we can’t afford.


Dujuan’s moving story and its missing pieces
@ Meg: Thanks for your post. The need for Aboriginal children to have their histories, identities, languages and culture taught and valued in our education system inspires In My Blood It Runs. This is a timely message for our local schools.
I was shocked when I worked as a teacher at Yirara College to discover that Aboriginal histories, identity, languages and culture are ignored.
The students knew almost nothing of their own history but were familiar with the white history of Australia. What could be more important to identity than knowing your own history?
It was always my interest at Yirara to address the shortfall of Aboriginal history but it was not encouraged.
It struck me as unbalanced that Anzac Day, commemorating mainly white wars, is so important in the Yirara calendar that staff work on that public holiday in order to accompany students to watch the march.
By contrast there are Aboriginal heroes that could and should be celebrated.
I found the story of Jandamarra inspirational and taught it. Jandamarra was a Bunaba resistance fighter who fought against cattlemen trying to take over his people’s country.
His bravery is celebrated in the film Jandamarra’s War.
This was objected to at Yirara because Jandamarra killed white people and this was considered unacceptable.
Teaching and valuing Aboriginal histories, identities and culture also has the capacity to engage students and stimulate their learning. In place of the boring mainstream curriculum at Yirara that fails to engage students it could be an important breakthrough.


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