The so obvious position for a cultural centre come art …

Comment on National Indigenous Art Gallery future in doubt: Gunner by Trevor Shiell.

The so obvious position for a cultural centre come art showplace is adjacent to Yirrara college and in conjunction with that institution.
It would enable the students to display and promote their own culture and art and at the same time acquire the business skills needed to run such a business, as well as showing the positive side of Indigenous education.
As a complete complex it should also incorporate an open air market for the combined art centre movement.
Of course, this would go down like a lead balloon with the huge vested interests North of The Gap but as Professor Ian Chubb, former Chief scientist, recently said to the National Press Club, its the communal good that is sadly lacking in many planning matters, not sectional inwardly directed interests as so often has happened here.

Recent Comments by Trevor Shiell

Mating odour to catch feral cats
Last year I lost 16 prize chooks to wild dogs, and then the feral cats got in and took the replacement chickens.
Using the same cat trap and chook pellets I have caught 10 rabbits so far and fed them to the crocodile as dessert.
The ears from most of those cats have gone to genetic research interstate to trace their origin and hopefully to eventually research into reducing their numbers.
And with all the ferals we have here, I still don’t understand why the CRC for research into feral animal control appears to be based in Tasmania.
It obviously should be here, but we are further away by far, than the deer, goats etc which are right under the public and political eye.


Ted Egan: Forget splitting hairs, counting drops of blood.
Again we have looked around and ignored what we don’t want to see.
Having lived in a rural part of Fiji for many years, the efforts of the British there go largely unnoticed, and often criticised, as they do here.
The Brits stepped in in Fiji as requested by the chiefs and the first thing they did was to sit the chiefs who were at war down around a bowl of Kava and determined who owned which pieces of land traditionally.
This land ownership was then assigned to a common ancestor, (a “matangali”) and carefully recorded so everyone knew which family group they belonged to, and which piece of traditional land was theirs.
Now every child born with a common Fijian ancestor is recorded in a register as belonging to that piece of land and is recorded as “kai viti”.
My children were all born in that lovely country to my wife and I and are all “Kai loma” I am “Kai valangi” meaning to have come from another country and my wife is “Kai viti” having come from Fiji.
Kai loma (loma means inside) means between, or inside both and is a lovely way to describe people who are between as so many of us are.
Is that all too simple?
As a footnote my children are all eligible to claim ownership of their traditional land in Fiji but have chosen not to do so as land is scarce.
However, whenever we return their Fijian heritage makes them very comfortable.
There is a middle path, but for some reason it is sometimes ignored.


Four weeks to comment on fracking chaos
It is unfortunate that there has not been a delving into history and current short term politics has taken over.
In the seventies under Labor and Rex Connor there was a plan for a national gas grid linking the West and East.
It was scoffed at the time but it made so much common sense to link the Eastern demand with the Western resource. It still does.
There is no need for fracking at all here but the debate has been dominated by short term self interest, and now a large scale investment bank is on the track realising that the shortest way to link the two is via Brewer Estate and the existing pipe network. Hence their investment.
This is still 400 or 500 km shorter than through Moomba – a fact well recognised by the commercial interests.
There are already two possible sites for such a pipeline pencilled in.
We don’t need fracking at all, and the potential for a central industrial estate based at Brewer stands out but conveniently ignored for reasons unknown.


The tree or the bench?
Garth Drake: I go up to visitors and ask for their impressions of the place. People from Central Australian tourism should do the same.
They might get some off the cuff surprises. The most impressive thing there is the geology, but no attempt to explain how it all came about or how Larapinta Drive got its name.
A couple of picnic tables and a bench seat or two would be nice.


New drive to make Pitchi Richi a public treasure
Wonderful news. For far too long authorities have not recognised that the tourism future of Alice lies largely south of The Gap, between The Gap and the airport.
There are too many vested commercial interests and conventional real estate interests to allow heritage type development north of The Gap.
They refuse to look at places like Hahndorf and Ballarat to see how heritage issues are basic to their economies, and contribute to the communal good.
No one has asked why the Katherine, Mt Isa, and Mclaren Vale tourism centres are all on the main approach to town where they have a captive market, but ours is crowded into a space with little or no parking.
The Big M stores have a mathematical formula on which they base their shop position.
It is based on the number of passing vehicles and pedestrians. If they did as we do they would go broke just as we are. An old Frank Sinatra film says it all (A hole in the head)
He who whispers down the well
About the thing he has to sell
Will never make as many dollars
As he who climbs a tree and hollers.
I don’t see too many tourism people standing on the South Road at the Welcome Rock where they all stop, or hollering as they go past.


Be Sociable, Share!

A new way to support our journalism

We do not have a paywall. If you support our independent journalism you can make a financial contribution by clicking the red button below. This will help us cover expenses and sustain the news service we’ve been providing since 1994, in a locally owned and operated medium.

Erwin Chlanda, Editor