It’s a moot point – recent surveys (such as reported …

Comment on Make Oz Day a celebration of the future, not the past by Alex Nelson.

It’s a moot point – recent surveys (such as reported in The Conversation’s “New research reveals our complex attitudes to Australia Day”) reveal there is overwhelming support for January 26 as Australia Day in all states and territories (intriguingly highest in WA).
This debate is just spinning round in circles.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

Make Oz Day a celebration of the future, not the past
@ Domenico Pecorari (Posted January 30, 2019 at 10:05 am): I once held the same opinion, Domenico, that January 1 is a more suitable date to be ascribed as “Australia Day” because it is the anniversary date of the commencement of Federation.
In fact, that was my reasoning in letters I wrote to Chief Minister Steve Hatton in December 1987 and to Marshall Perron in February 1990; in my first letter suggesting the NT Government institute the practice of observing January 1 as “Australian Federation Day”, and in the second to suggest that the NT Government aim for January 1, 2001, as the target date for achieving statehood for the NT.
This later became the objective of the NT Statehood campaign initiated by Marshall Perron in 1994 and culminated in the referendum loss on October 3, 1998.
It’s only in more recent times I became aware that Captain Arthur Phillip, the commander of the First Fleet no less, was well aware of the long-term significance of establishing the first European colony at Sydney Cove: “Yultide is almost upon us and my hope is by no means exhausted despite the difficulties met with; given time, and additional force, together with proper people for cultivating the land … I know now that I can make a nation.”


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Aboriginal participation needed to Close the Gap: Mundine
Here is the news: “Legislative Councillor, Frank Johnson of Alice Springs, refuses to let up on his theme that “a tannery or some other industry to absorb aborigine [sic] labour is a must for the Alice Springs district.
“He has written to various parliamentarians about it, spoken about the subject in Council and made numerous statements through the press.
“Many in Alice Springs have supported the member in his cry. This week Mr Johnson aimed a new bullet at the powers that be, and it contained a new warning.
“Either the Government will establish a tannery or some other suitable industry, or they had better get busy and build bigger gaols, he stated.
“Mr Johnson means by that, that unless some suitable employment is available to the aborigines [sic] at present receiving some sort of education, then there is going to be a lot of trouble in a very short time”.
This was published under the headline “Build industry or bigger gaol at Alice Springs” in the Centralian Advocate, September 11, 1953.
What goes round comes round when there’s nothing new under the sun.


‘Major Project’ is ready to go – except for the money
Kind of ironic that the Gunner Labor Government, in its eagerness to assure a “jobs led recovery, not a cuts led recovery,” is placing so much reliance on … ahem, an open cut mine.


Deloitte to close Alice Springs office
Erwin, the top floor was actually built at the request of the ABC as the building was originally intended to be two storeys.
The NT Tourist Commission was one of the early occupants of the building, along with the Housing Commission, too.
Thanks to Cyclone Tracy, the headquarters of the Tourist Commission was relocated there from Darwin, and remained in Alice Springs at various locations until 1992.


Council resignations and surprising alliances
@ Scotty (Posted June 30, 2020 at 4:45 pm): “By the way, Willshire was not found guilty of anything” – while in turn Lindy Chamberlain was found guilty.
History shows the decisions of courts are not sacrosanct; and in both examples, the findings were (at a minimum) miscarriages of justice.


Deloitte to close Alice Springs office
Looks like we’re going to have to change the name of the building from its current “Deloitte House”.
Ah well, it wouldn’t be setting a precedent – for many years it was called Sturt House but in fact was originally named “Stuart House” when the building was opened in 1973.
The first name didn’t last long and, although I haven’t sighted any documentary evidence, I suspect it was changed when it was realised there was already a “Stuart House” in town.
This was the still brand new south wing of the Melanka government hostel adjoining Stuart Terrace.
Well, poor old Melanka has long gone and Deloitte is leaving so maybe the original name of Stuart House can be restored.
Who says history is forgotten when we have site name changes?
[ED – Alex, we should have a party with the ABC. They used to occupy the top floor. And the Tourist Commission (yes, that’s the mob that actually knew how to promote The Centre) was on floor one or two.]


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