One hopes that Coles have achieved critical mass now, with …

Comment on Painting new step in store’s growing links with Aboriginal people by Alex Hope.

One hopes that Coles have achieved critical mass now, with enough Aboriginal employees to make them feel they really belong, and to provide mutual support.
Previous significant efforts at Aboriginal employment by supermarkets appeared to fail, with the recruits falling by the wayside once their initial support was withdrawn.
The same happened at the hospital where there was an initially successful scheme about 20 years ago. Once the funded support system was withdrawn the workforce was not large enough to be mutually supportive, and they dwindled away with no program in place for ongoing recruitment.
Ironically, there was a much higher proportion of Aboriginal employees at Alice Springs hospital in the 80s than there is now.
Meaningful employment is one of the foundations for the health of the individual and their families: It is great to see the supermarket chains taking a leading role here.
Let us hope this time they follow through with retention strategies, and that other large employers look to fulfil their social responsibilities.

Recent Comments by Alex Hope

Tree death and the challenge of heatwaves
What about systematic water harvesting for nature strips so that water from thunderstorms etc is retained rather than running into the drains immediately?
This is something property owners can do themselves to help preserve their own street trees by making bunds adjacent to the kerb.
The Council could cut slots to enlarge the existing expansion joints in the kerb to allow some infiltration into the subsoil between the kerbstones.
If a few neighbours got together to trial this in a street or two in town the idea might be proven by demonstrating healthier growth in a year or three.


NTG asks AAPA to consult with custodians on gallery & new site
Bonkers!
Thanks to Eli Melky we just finished paying for our current council chambers a year or three early, but surely it was built for a life of 30 years plus.
It was a state-of-the-art energy efficient building at the time. Why on earth would we knock it down and start again?
The ineptitude of the NT Government surpasseth all understanding – mine anyway.
AND since when did the AAPA become a representative body, with the authority to speak for the Aboriginal people of the region?
If AAPA is the appropriate body, why was it not consulted in the first place? Or has the NT Government picked them in the hope they will give the desired answer on this gallery question, when the traditional owners have already voiced their view?


All views about gallery location will be considered: Lauren Moss
Yes indeed, there needs to be an Aboriginal consensus about the site.
If the CBD is to be revitaliised it needs people living in it, a gallery open 10-4 will not do much, permanent residents will do a lot more.
What about the old drive-in?
Pros and cons anyone?


Council: fob off, rejection, and secret moves
Could someone please explain why the civic centre site would be better than the Melanka site?
Have we finished paying for the $10M rebuild of the Council chambers yet?
Knocking it down, building a new civic center at ANZAC high school, compared to starting from a clean site at Melanka….how does it make sense?
What’s more, is any one remembering that the traditional owners objected not only to ANZAC oval being the site, but they said that for cultural reasons a national gallery should be sited south of the Gap. I still don’t understand how a government that is supposedly respectful of Aboriginal culture, that wants to build a gallery to celebrate said culture, then intends to ride roughshod over said Aboriginal culture in siting a gallery?
As our Seppo friends say: “go figure”.


$20m gated community proposed for Pine Gap staff
I thought our public housing policy was to disperse minority groups around the suburbs and not to create a ghetto. Why should it be different for these public housing tenants?


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