Wouldn’t it be great if the climate crisis was all …

Comment on Council: yes to protecting NT drinking water from fracking, no to declaring a climate emergency by Jenny Taylor.

Wouldn’t it be great if the climate crisis was all just hogwash and Eastside ferals! I for one would be so happy! Unfortunately for all of us, the science is terrifying and abundantly clear, and events are cascading even faster than science has predicted.
So congratulations to Alice Springs Council on preparing a strong climate policy for our town, and on your unanimous vote in support of protecting Alice water from fracking.
Don’t rest on your laurels now! In consideration of the very real threats to our future, make common cause with Alice residents and do everything in your power to meet this challenge. The urgency of the situation demands that you transcend factions and work together as fiercely and effectively as you can.
A declaration of climate emergency is not hogwash or a PR exercise.
It’s a practical way of initiating and focussing timely council responses to the threat we are facing.
Cr Cocking’s motion to get LGANT to set up a working group to support regional councils in sorting out their responses to the climate crisis is a pragmatic step forward.
Mayor Ryan’s point that small councils are less well resourced that Alice Springs Council is not an adequate argument against a working group – rather it’s an argument for assisting regional councils to take whatever action is within their power.
Go for it Councillors!
And Alice residents – support Councillors by expressing your concerns at the beginning of next ordinary council meeting, and by being present in the public gallery.
It was great to see a full house at the last meeting, including families with young children who will inherit the consequences of the decisions being made now.
Next meeting: 6pm September 30.

Recent Comments by Jenny Taylor

Art and nature: a happy encounter
Thanks Pip MacManus, for another great contribution to accessible and meaningful public art in our region.
The little birds will make their mark and be remembered by many visitors to Watarrka.
Same for the budgies at the airport and the birds and plants at the cemetery.
At this time when we face unprecedented losses of species of plants, animals and insects, art that supports direct emotional connection with the natural world has a vital part to play in public life, and in keeping us sane.


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