Leaving the Anzac Hill sports ground as it is has …

Comment on Wakefield ready for fight: affirms intention to acquire oval by John Bell.

Leaving the Anzac Hill sports ground as it is has a lot of sporting tradition behind it.
Sport is a major Alice community social bonding element. Easily identifiable and easily maintained.
And who knows? Leaving it as it is may see the Youth Centre May Day Sports afternoon rise from the ashes of commercialism in future years.
Post-Coronavirus, a return to a traditional annual community bonding sports day with free gate entry and open to the poorest sections of the community is a cost effective no-brainer.

Recent Comments by John Bell

NT to become just one Federal seat of Parliament
Before Warren has to toss the coin, I have a unanswered questions about the expenditure of Commonwealth Department of Health grant funds in 2010-2012 in the Indigenous Marathon Project on his watch.
Simple questions.
No reason why simple answers cannot be forthcoming


Zachary Rolfe prosecution: possible hearing in September
Thanks for the explanation, Erwin.
Somehow, though, I tend to believe that a great number of Alicians will be most reluctant to express their views publicly. Alicians on all sides of the issue.
Good people, people of conscience and integrity. Alicians who love their town. Alicians who are in despair and are losing hope.


Zachary Rolfe prosecution: possible hearing in September
So many Alicians are refraining from making any comment whatsoever on this most important social matter. Their silence is significant. Their reasons for remaining silent would be most enlightening.
[ED – No surprise there, John. The matter is sub judice, that means “under the judge,” and publishing any fact relating to evidence, unless having been mentioned in court, is in contempt of court and subject to significant penalties. We will have a thorough coverage of the court case.]


Person offences up, property down, in lock-down month
I would think these stats have been replicated in all the states and territories during the lockdown.
Easy to see why home break-ins and car thefts were down. People have been at home. Thieves and robbers aren’t particularly known for their bravery when they know they may face an angry family member with a baseball bat.
But it doesn’t really explain why commercial break-ins have been down. No trading, no cash on the premises perhaps?


The first Aboriginal preschool in Alice Springs
@ Alex Nelson: “Incredibly (to my mind, at least), Rona Glynn was only 16 years old and still studying as a student herself!” Alex.
Interesting that you raise this fact of Rona teaching at sixteen, such a young age.
My mother Doreen McArdle began teaching at the age of 16 at St Joseph’s primary school run by the Sisters of Mercy in Emu Park Central Queensland in the early 1930s.
Mum told me that the nuns selected teenagers to teach young children classes and supervised them as they taught before they went off to teachers’ college.
My mum went on to the Range College in Rocky and then worked as a governess on a Central Queensland station.
Mum said the nuns at Catholic schools selected and supervised a number of Aboriginal teenagers (all girls) who went to college with her and taught later as governesses.
So it seems that this may have been the accepted practice those days.
Teenagers given practical on the job experience in classrooms before going off to teachers college for formal qualification, at least in Queensland.


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