Tag Archives: marijuana

Booze making allegations, cannabis in tyre tube

 

 

Police do not respond to allegations of brewing illegal alcohol but say they seized more than $95,000 worth of marijuana destined for remote communities.  FULL STORY »

Truckies on ice, foreign tourist with LSD, dope in 13 cars

 

 

Police say they will step up searches and testing in cross border operations, including alcohol runners, with Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia police. FULL STORY »

NT poll – only one more sleep

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A $10,000 bounty on drug dealers, movies made in the NT, sharp drop in housing approvals, parks to be opened to trailbikes, 4WDs, and wind power beats gas power in our southern neighbour: Food for thought before you vote. FULL STORY »

Alcohol by far enemy number one in crime fight

Booze remains by far the most damaging drug in the Central Australian outback: the top police officer in the bush says alcohol is doing 95% of the damage, with ganja (marijuana) the most popular illicit drug, and amphetamines playing a very minor role.
Police Superintendent Peter Gordon’s beat is called Central Desert, with Alice Springs in the middle, around 600,000 square kilometers, twice the size of Germany.
He has 52 officers in 17 remote police stations. The trauma caused by alcohol is always on top of their agenda … and the scams for getting grog to areas where it is banned display a destructive cunning. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. Photo: Backpacker’s luggage being searched by police using a sniffer dog in the Adelaide bus terminal, a suspected place from where drugs are imported to the Northern Territory. FULL STORY »

Intervention – solid black? Or shades of grey and even some light?

1343 Aboriginal residents in 16 remote communities give their assessment of what the Intervention has achieved and the challenges to come.

 

The Northern Territory Intervention – “punitive” and a “betrayal of Aboriginal people” as conditions deteriorate even further, as the Stop the Intervention Collective in Sydney (STICS) would have us believe?

Or making some headway, as the responses of 1343 Aboriginal residents surveyed in 16 remote communities suggest?

Believe the STICS media release that paints a picture, without nuance, of devastation and despair?

Or the research results that discern the shades of grey, particularly between small and larger communities, and even discern some light?  Your call.

The Community Safety and Wellbeing Research Study was commissioned by the Commonwealth Department of Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA, the one responsible, of course, for the Intervention) and was conducted by four social research companies, employing 50 local Indigenous people to work with them. They made three trips to each community between December last year and June this year, systematically asking residents, using a questionnaire, about the changes that have taken place over the last three years, producing quantitative data for statistical analysis. Residents also took part in discussions about their own experiences and priorities in their community, producing qualitative data.

The study summaries the key “very strong” messages from the survey: the majority of people judge that their life has improved over the last three years; young people are the epicentre of many difficult community dynamics; and, small communities are very different to large ones.

Its authors comment that there is an enormous policy challenge to create conditions in which it is more difficult for young people to opt for a ‘party’ lifestyle, and easier to get a job. They also says there is scope for working to understand why larger communities are much more difficult environments in which to achieve positive change, and to fashion policy to address their very particular dynamics.  Pictured: Children during lunch break at Ntaria School in 2009. Their hot meal had been provided by a school nutrition program, the likes of which, along with the Basics Card, have meant that more kids over the last three years have been getting more food. Photo from our archive. KIERAN FINNANE reports. FULL STORY »