Tag Archives: remote communities

Booze making allegations, cannabis in tyre tube

 

 

Police do not respond to allegations of brewing illegal alcohol but say they seized more than $95,000 worth of marijuana destined for remote communities.  FULL STORY »

Return to community scramble to beat ban

If they do not leave today they will have to self-quarantine for 14 days. That would mean being alone and having no contact with family, they are being told.  FULL STORY »

COVID-19 pauses Origin’s Beetaloo activity


 
Origin remains committed to the project, rescheduling further work to the second half of the year.  Their decision follows concerns raised about the safety of remote communities potentially exposed to COVID-19 infection from FIFO sources. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

UPDATED 26 March 2020 2.37pm.  FULL STORY »

Government millions spent outside tender process

 

 

Housing usually tops the list of Aboriginal disadvantages and it gobbles up much of the Closing the Gap government spending. But the money doesn’t benefit the right people. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. FULL STORY »

CLC wants say about Indigenous voice to Parliament

2480 CLC council 1 SMCLC delegates want to be part of designing an Aboriginal body advising the Parliament to ensure it represents remote communities and acts against racially discriminatory laws. FULL STORY »

Royal Commission’s broad inquiry: ‘the way kids live their lives’

p2370-ntrc-forum-sm

 
 

“The difficulty will be to draw together all these strands into recommendations that can be implemented.” KIERAN FINNANE  reports. FULL STORY »

The little children are clever

 

Part One: The choice not to go school

 

Little Aboriginal children in remote communities are choosing not to attend school.  From their point of view, this is the right thing to do, writes BLAIR McFARLAND (pictured).

  FULL STORY »

Another strategy to get kids to school in remote communities

In the Northern Territory’s remote communities only 13% of kids are attending school 80% of the time, says Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion. 80% is generally regarded as the minimum required to make learning progress. Describing the situation as “horrific” Senator Scullion has announced a two-year strategy to break “the cycle of non-attendance”.

  FULL STORY »

Is Vinnies’ Intervention blast true to pledge?

How much accurate and relevant information is needed to start a protest campaign? The ratio is in indirect proportion to the distance from what is being protested about: The further you are away from the action, the less you need to know – and get away with it. At least that’s what is suggested by the “Six years of the NT Intervention is six years too long” campaign by the St Vincent de Paul Society, ACOSS and the National Welfare Rights Network (NWRN). ERWIN CHLANDA reports. FULL STORY »

What future for the Aboriginal art economy?

In the global economic downturn all artists are doing it tough. How will the Aboriginal art industry ride it out? A CRC project will attempt to come up with some answers.

 

In any picture of the Aboriginal economy, especially on remote communities, the art industry would have to be seen as the shining light, for the way that it has engaged large numbers of people, bringing them purpose, cultural prestige, income and opportunity.  So why is it, in particular, the subject of a seven year research project by the CRC for Remote Economic Participation?

It’s not the only focus for the CRC of course – there are 12 research areas all up – but Aboriginal Art Economies is a flagship project with a $1.5m budget and will run for the entire seven years of the CRC’s life, with the final years devoted to “rolling-out” the research findings in practical ways.

Perth-based research leader Tim Acker has hands-on experience of the industry stretching back 15 years. He was for instance a manager of the famous Warlayirti Artists in Balgo, WA and more recently was one of the co-founders of the Canning Stock Route Project.

Mr Acker acknowledges that the Aboriginal art industry is the “single most obvious and long-term success story to come out of remote Aboriginal Australia”, but he says it is still “characterised at pretty much every point by some form of fragility”: “The way art is produced, the community circumstances, the art centres, the connections between artists and galleries, the GFC and the overall downturn in the art market in the last few years, all those things have put into sharp relief that there is nothing fixed about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art sector.”

And some of fragility has come about because the industry it has been “too successful”, he says. For example, there are issues of over-supply and in this regard, the marketing of art on the internet has been a double-edged sword. KIERAN FINNANE reports.

 

Pictured above: Nancy Nyanyarna Jackson working on her painting in the Warakurna Artists studio. Photo by Rhett Hammerton FULL STORY »