Tag Archives: Terry Mills

Territory Alliance to ‘lock the gate’ on fracking

 

 

 

The Territory Alliance, if elected, will ban fracking in the Northern Territory due to widespread community concern and the unviable economic case of this controversial practice, writes TA Leader Terry Mills (pictured). FULL STORY »

Territory Alliance looking beyond COVID-19

 

 

We believe the Commonwealth Government, in working with financial institutions, should provide a business rental rebate of 75% which can be paid to landlords who accept 75% of rents as full payment, writes Terry Mills (pictured), Territory Alliance. FULL STORY »

Convention ignored in vote on Opposition

 

 

Terry Mills and Robyn Lambley (pictured) are no longer heading up the Opposition: “The collusion in the Chamber between the CLP, the ALP and the Speaker was nothing short of disgusting,” says Mrs Lambley. ERWIN CHLANDA reports. FULL STORY »

Robyn Lambley to join Territory Alliance

 

“I got to a crossroads.  I’m watching the town crumble around me … and couldn’t deliver as an Independent,” says Mrs Lambley. ERWIN CHLANDA reports.

 

UPDATED 18 March 2020, 11.58am: Terry Mills has formally made the case to Speaker of the Legislative Assembly for Territory Alliance to be recognised as the official NT Opposition.

 

UPDATE 18 March 2020, 3.55pm: Territory Alliance is now the official NT Opposition. FULL STORY »

2020 poll: Can Territory Alliance be a political force?

 

 

Can the Territory Alliance, led by former CLP Chief Minister Terry Mills (at right), become a real third force or is it just another minority party protest that is destined to join the historical spicks and specks of political parties left far behind? By MARK J SMITH ponders the question. FULL STORY »

Independents now ineffective?

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Is Robyn Lambley (at left) in breach of the Electoral Act by touting a new party, asks her former opponent in Araluen, Steve Brown (at right). FULL STORY »

Anderson says she is not in conflict with Chief Minister on bilingual schooling

Minister for Indigenous Advancement Alison Anderson says there is no conflict between her vision of schooling in the bush and the Chief Minister’s. In a long speech to parliament on Tuesday she said that teaching traditional culture and language “should not be done in schools”. This has been reported as in conflict with County Liberals policy, with Chief Minister Terry Mills stating yesterday that, while the objective is to teach English,  “you have to use the language that they bring into the school in those first two or three years”.

Ms Anderson told the Alice Springs News Online this morning that this of course is the “pragmatic” way to go: “You can’t start teaching bush children in a language they can’t understand. You use the traditional language to get to English, which is what schools do now. It’s called ‘scaffolding’.” KIERAN FINNANE reports.

 

Pictured: Alison Anderson at Hermannsburg on polling day. Her own Indigenous language skills are legendary but she wants bush children to become fluent in English and this must be the primary focus in schools, she says. FULL STORY »

Interest costs a ‘dead weight’ on NT budget, says economist

UPDATED October 25, 2012, 11.55 am. See FULL STORY. 

 

Reducing debt means reducing the size of the public service 

 

Economist Rolf Gerritsen welcomes the Country Liberals Government’s “fiscal rectitude”: “Let us hope that [it] lasts longer than the Government’s first budget (which is as long as it lasted when the Martin Government was elected).” He describes the Government’s intentions to return the NT budget to surplus by the end of its first term and then to begin repaying debt as “laudable” as interest costs “are a dead weight on the budget”. KIERAN FINNANE reports.  FULL STORY »

Criminal lawyers oppose Country Liberals on mandatory sentencing

It’s about heavier not fairer punishments and it does not deter offenders, they say.

 

Mandatory sentencing is strongly associated with the dying phase of the last Country Liberal Government. In many ways Terry Mills leads a different CLP into this election campaign, but it seems the leopard can’t lose this particular spot – a ‘lock ’em up reflex.

Earlier this month, responding to concern over attacks on taxi drivers Mr Mills announced what looks to be a one strike mandatory sentencing policy for assaults on anyone serving the public, not only taxi drivers but including “bus drivers, public servants, bank tellers, retail and hospitality workers”.

An assault on this broad category of victim – including, for example, bouncers at night clubs – will be defined as “aggravated” and attract a minimum sentence of three months. This beefs up the party’s existing two strike policy statement (see their website) for assault: as a second offence, any assault will attract a minimum of one month; an aggravated assault, a minimum of three months; and causing serious harm, a minimum of one year.

The core problem with this approach – whether to property crime as in the old CLP regime or violent offending –  lies with its failure to take account of an almost infinite variety of circumstances and human responses to them.

KIERAN FINNANE discusses the issues with Russell Goldflam, President of the Criminal Lawyers Association of the NT .  FULL STORY »