@2 So a few years ago when you popped your …

Comment on Council will look at tree register and by-law by Steve Brown.

@2 So a few years ago when you popped your head over the horizon and saw a lovely town in which you chose to reside who do you think was responsible for creating that town? A bunch of Loopy Left Greenies or some hard working Pioneering Developers, people with vision, guts and determination, people who saw the possibilities and made the most of them? Yep, actually made things happen! As a third generation Alicespringsian I grew up with great expectations of where this town was going, and we were going places. We weren’t and didn’t consider ourselves an Old Historical Town like you see along the coast, we are and were a raw pioneering town. A frontier town, our story hardly begun.
Alice at that time had several dairies, poultry farms, horticulture on a scale that not only catered for our own needs but for a big part of the Territory. We had a pastoral industry many times the size it is now and we had created from scratch the Territory’s largest and most vibrant tourist industry. Our airport was many times as busy and the tourism numbers vastly greater than our capital. That’s what our development driven goals brought us, success.
Unfortunately our success also brought us many Loopy Lefties with their own wacky agendas, people who didn’t know anything at all about our town, its goals, its history or its economics, but they liked what they saw, settled here bringing with them small minded, chip on the shoulder politics from the coast, contributing or risking nothing of their own. They none the less demanded their views be heard on everything. They thought we needed saving and went steadily about that, the result over the last thirty or so years, more and more restrictions, more and more bureaucracy.
Their great endeavours to stop further development caught the ear of a Government ever ready to restrict its spending in the South and very soon we saw a complete clamp on growth, almost no land release, despite our town having more available land than anywhere on earth. The result? Artificially high property prices resulting in artificially high rents. The results, people struggling to make ends meet, extra pressure on welfare housing and already transient population becoming even more so as people left unable to make ends meet. The result, less customers in shops, much harder to get staff for shops, lower quality of staff in shops, the result very difficult to run a business.
Put that together with burgeoning crime rates and you have a town in decline, a town to which many are no longer willing to commit. Business becomes too hard, either downsizing or closing their doors. Between crime and lessening facilities tourism has also declined, so now there are no dairy farms, no poultry farms, much reduced horticulture, much reduced pastoral industry and tourism a small fraction of what it was. We’ve lost our extra airlines and our airport is no longer amongst the nation’s busiest. Yeh, that’s some achievement for the Anti-development Lobby, alright! When you’ve finished implementing your agenda, can you put the lights out? Thanks mate.

Steve Brown Also Commented

Council will look at tree register and by-law
@Trevor, Alice needs profits, Mate! Without them there will be no wonderful investments on the East Side! Alice Springs is a service town in one of the world’s most exotic locations, set amongst Australia’s most spectacular scenery. We don’t have to dummy down our town and turn it into some-kind of corny theme park to attract tourists.
What we do have to produce is a vibrant healthy law abiding town that can cater for all their, as well as our own needs. In any progressive town there is always a bit of too and froing between the old and the new. The last thing we need is more restrictions our town is already chocking on them.
It’s coming to point where investing here is no longer going to be a viable proposition. It’s already extremely difficult to get a project off the ground and with other places offering much more for less it’s only those with great attachment and love for the place that keep on trying.
The facts are we need our hotels and motels, we need our shops and shopping centers, we need our homes and our streets, without them we are nothing!
Towns are for people, buildings, roads and houses. Why do they tend to look the same? Because they’re all towns!!


Council will look at tree register and by-law
Given the facile and divisive circumstances that have arisen over sacred trees do you really think we should be adding to our town’s woes by usurping property rights, putting yet another hurdle in the way of development in a town that has already reached crisis point on the development front?
Restrictions like this are a direct threat to our town’s already struggling economy a site such as the ANZ carpark can be rendered uneconomic to develop by such a restriction on the removal of trees that are after all owned by, and often planted by, the block’s owners.
Not only will such restrictions result in property owners removing what they can, while they can, they will also lead to less planting of trees in the first place. Even though it’s always a bit sad to see grown trees felled the facts are that the native river red gums are very fast growing when well looked after.
The decision of one owner or an earlier time to plant in a particular location should not hold our future hostage! That absolutely must apply to such trees as are growing on the Old Melanka Site most of which are not native to this area.
The restriction on the removal of such trees elsewhere in the nation has led to many difficulties for property owners, often left facing life threatening fire and windfall damage.
Instead of constantly placing obstacles in the path of property owners and developers let’s put our efforts into what they might bring of benefit to our town and actively encourage them to plant the right trees in the right places.
Even though there are most definitely exceptions to this rule we must keep in mind that towns are primarily places for buildings and people.
The old, the superseded and the irrelevant must make way for the new. Let’s keep that in mind as we allow our town to grow and accommodate the places of the future.  
After all we are surrounded by thousands of kilometers of beautiful natural Trees and bushland, I’m sure there’s a little room for us to do our own thing.


Recent Comments by Steve Brown

Wakefield insists on Anzac Oval, ignores majority
The longer this process goes on the more likely we are to lose it altogether. That’s a loss of $150m into our economy, just on build!
The government has made up its mind on the site. That’s their right! That’s what we elect them for, to make what they see as the best decision, on our behalf!
So, while about 4% of the population whinge about it, and try to foil the process, keep this in mind.
If it doesn’t go ahead at Anzac there will be no new rugby grounds! Another $20m to $30m.
There will be no amphitheatre or the CBD space to put one. Another $3m to $4m.
We will miss out on an expansion of CBD parking. Millions more!
And we will miss the opportunity to create much increased foot traffic into the CBD and the resulting growth in small business. Millions more.
There is now very little chance of it going anywhere else. It will either go at the Anzac Hill site or we will lose it altogether!
Federal Politicians looking for an excuse to fund it in South Australia have been handed exactly what they want, local dissent!
It shouldn’t take much more to tip the scales, if the damage hasn’t already been done.
If we believe in our community, if we want to grow our economy, create opportunity for ourselves and our children into the future we have to be prepared to accept change, to put our petty likes and dislikes along with what often amounts to rather shallow competitive political viewpoints aside for the greater good.
To put it bluntly, “suck it up and stand aside in support of the best obtainable outcome for our community!
Let’s not cut off our nose to spite our face!


The millions and the misery
Interesting article that this may be, I would not like to see discussion centred around the ins and out of funding to various Aboriginal organisations being conflated in anyway with our discussions around funding and locating our proposed youth centre.
We are attempting to get a whole of community approach to this!
That approach, if it is to be successful, will most certainly include the organisations mentioned.
While we clearly share everyone’s enthusiasm for the Old Memo Club as an ideal site for our centre and have said so publicly on a number of occasions, the fact remains that this is the legally owned property of Centercorp and the only way that we could possibly acquire it for the centre is if these organisations believe in our cause and choose to come on board, something that I very much encourage them to do.
My apologies Centrecorp and Congress if we have caused inconvenience, we were “dreaming” our best possible options for getting something off the ground, ASAP.
We fervently hope in the interests of this community’s children you will give the promoted concept some very serious consideration and come to understand as many already have, the true value to the community, and all your investment in it
It is having a happy, healthy, united community where kids know they are cared for and see exciting future prospects in front of them, with staff, volunteers and mentors from our new centre showing the way.


Memo Club for 24/7 youth centre?
@ Evelyne: No, definitely too far from CBD and don’t think the neighbours would be to keen.
The bed requirement part of the concept is “emergency bed requirement” only, as per “Careful’s” comment probably not a large demand for it. We could manage with temporary facilities and grow after assessing demand.
I imagine that most kids would catch the bus at the cessation of evening activities. The most important part of this centre will be kitchen, dining and activities which would also clearly encompass such things as after school care.
As for existing facilities: This is not a petty competition nor are we interested in the petty politics of those more interested in protecting their own backsides than looking after children.
Let’s deal with the basic facts: Governments of all persuasions have struggled with this issue for 50 years or so. They have funded and de-funded all manner of organisations in the process!
And they have failed.
Yes, there are existing organisation who have cross over interests.
However, we still have the issue.
In fact it is a large growing generational issue, at times literally hundreds of kids hanging about on our streets, growing crime and increasing isolation, increasing division, increasing us and them, increasing have and have not and increasing community anger and resentment.
The concept of bringing kids and community members, not just street kids into a central location, is not just about food and activities, it is about containing the hanging out to a really “cool” location and it is about cross community interaction.
Breaking down the division!
It is about rebuilding a community out of a rapidly growing divide that threatens its very foundations.
The issue is far greater than the petty self interests of a few professional youth workers who feel someone is intruding on their turf!
If your a genuine committed professional youth worker you will know the value of the community interaction too which I refer and you will get on board.
This is not a government initiative, it is a community movement, the only ones in the end who can really make a difference.
And not just for neglected kids, not just for underprivileged kids, but for all the kids in our community, which in the end means a difference for all of us!
We envisage that those centres already working in this area would come on board and work with us, probably moving their services into the central complex or maintain offices there, or doing pick ups and drop offs so that everybody’s together, part of the activity and excitement, of things going on: That is what we want to create.
We have said all along, while we are looking at a community youth centre driven by volunteers it would also incorporate professional management and youth workers.
This is about everybody in the sector putting aside selfish interest and uniting to bring about effective change.
It’s about making a massive difference to a whole lot of young lives and making our community a whole lot happier place to live for everybody.


Memo Club for 24/7 youth centre?
While I share the enthusiasm for getting our priorities right and dealing with our Youth issue first up, projects such as the art gallery are equally important in building a successful community … no economy, no people, no funds or assistance for a centre.
So we aren’t looking to swap one for another, we are looking to do both and more!
Importantly I can report to you that I am running into a great deal of support for the youth centre project from all sectors and I don’t think we are going to have to many issues funding this project, even with the art centre going ahead.
The cross community support I have encountered so far leads me to believe we are going to be successful in getting the project off the ground.
My real concern at this stage is the amount of time it will take to do that!
Obviously if we can’t find an existing facility of the right size and location i.e. the Memo Club there is likely to be a period of at least a couple of years before we can build and be operational.
This is a really urgent issue, requiring immediate action, especially when you think of those two years through the eyes of an eight year old child virtually living on the streets.
Two years is a lifetime, and for that matter for a town being battered by a street kid crime wave, two years is also an eternity!
So clearly we need to act and act now! All ideas are welcome but we must have large open space kitchen and dining, multiple toilets / bathrooms to cater for several hundred kids in a central well lit location.


Memo Club for 24/7 youth centre?
We were always aware that Congress had intentions for the Old Memo Club and our project certainly doesn’t hinge on being able to get our hands on those premises.
I put it forward as a potential location so that everyone would understand the desired CBD location, building size and layout that our proposed Centre requires, large open areas, dining and kitchen facilities – very much like the Memo Club.
This of course would have been ideal if it were available.
So if you change your mind Congress, there’s a lot of kids who would greatly appreciate it.
In the meantime I imagine we will be looking for temporary premises to get things underway while we raise the funds to build to our design.


Be Sociable, Share!