Thanks Rowan (Posted November 16, 2011 at 10:32 am), but …

Comment on Spot a tree? Chop it down! by Bob Durnan.

Thanks Rowan (Posted November 16, 2011 at 10:32 am), but if you’d read the earlier posts you would have seen that we already very clearly knew most of that.
My main complaint was about the tendency of some fire fighters, on at least some occasions, to stand watching fires spread to grass at the base of obviously vulnerable trees without taking action to arrest the flames before they engulf the trees.
They had plenty of water, had the opportunity to act without endangering themselves, the trees were close to where the fire engine and tanker were parked, but they chose not to act. When challenged one explained to me that if the fire bugs were going to light these fires, then why should fire fighters bother to try to save the trees?
Granted, the job is dangerous, often tedious and often thankless. Granted, that the activities of drunken firebugs are very frustrating.
But the point is, these are not the fire bugs’ trees, they are some of Alice Springs most precious assets, and where possible they should be protected.
I suspect that after this debate in the Alice Springs News, more efforts at protecting these trees will be made in the future.
Already the work that quite obviously should have occurred last winter (clearing the matted dry couch and thick clumps of buffel grass from around the bases of mature trees along the river banks between the Schwartz Crescent and Casino causeways) has finally been done, mainly by work gangs made up of prisoners, over the past few weeks.
Let’s hope that this work continues at regular intervals before the danger to these trees returns.

Bob Durnan Also Commented

Spot a tree? Chop it down!
There are several questions, to my way of thinking: one is why trees were permitted to continue burning once they had caught fire, when at least sometimes the burning could have been caused to cease, with the likelihood that some of these trees could have been saved; but more importantly is why trees were permitted to catch fire in circumstances where, in at least some cases, this could have been prevented without too much trouble?
Why are many trees in the Todd and Charles beds still permitted to stand closely surrounded by densely packed, dry buffel and couch banks, in unnaturally dangerous conditions for the trees, without any attempts to remove the danger by cutting and removing these domineering introduced grasses?


Spot a tree? Chop it down!
This awful planning by whomever at Larapinta camp is in keeping with the long trend in Alice: a war against natural shade and healthy vegetation by a variety of authorities, including some involved at the municipal council, as well as some at PAWA. Where the CBD once had many useful and beautiful shade trees in Bath, Hartley, Todd and other streets where people park cars, they have virtually all been eliminated by the treephobes in our midst. (A treephobe is one who has an unnatural fear of falling leaves and bark; they are so litter- and risk-averse that they would prefer that people living with forty-plus celsius temperatures should enjoy full sunshine on their vehicles rather than having to put up with kurrajong seeds or cedar berries pummelling their windscreens, or a bit of natural litter on the footpath. The treephobes also honour the ideal of fully concreted pavements, rather than risk the growth of a blade of grass or a seedling, or a bit of natural soakage for the root systems of any remaining trees that dare to attempt to survive in the urban wonderland. The continued existence of the wonderful arboreal giants on the Melanka block is probably currently causing them to suffer regular nightmares).
Alice residents would have observed also the recent wholesale eradication of mature trees and bushes in the car park opposite the YHA/old walk-in cinema, on the corner of Leichhardt Terrace and Parsons St, and the apparent decision by authorities to not try to save many trees that caught fire in the river bed over the last three months. On enquiring twice (in late August, early Sept) to fire crew members who were standing by and watching trees catch fire from dense buffel grass, as to why they weren’t attempting to douse these flames burning next to red gums before they inevitably set fire to the bark and dead wood on the trees, I was given to understand that since “they” were lighting all these fires, then it wasn’t the firefighters’ job to save the trees. It didn’t seem to occur to the firefighters that the trees are the collective heritage and wealth of all townspeople, and a major tourism asset, or that it was their job to protect this naturally occurring ‘property’ as well as constructed assets. (Having also reported some fire outbreaks to the police number in Darwin, and on occasion having been met with complete disinterest unless the fire was likely to affect constructed property, it is obvious that it’s not just some Alice firemen who don’t seem to think that the red gums are important to the wellbeing of Alice Springs. On one occasion my offer to supply a description of a person who had just lit a fire was also met with lack of any interest at the Darwin end of the phone).
Admittedly some of the elimination of the street trees was probably carried out by the treephobes under the cloak of a floral version of politically-correct xenophobia (get rid of the foreign-born vegetation with a bit of botanical ethnic cleansing), the fashion for this has now subsided to a significant extent, so it may be a good time for shade fanciers to speak up more about these civic crimes.
How about an anti-fascist shadey alliance to seek a presence on the next Town Council?


Recent Comments by Bob Durnan

Police want parents to stop youth crime
Evelyne, you forget that half the adults of Alice work under contracts that forbid them from speaking publicly.
Others fear the repercussions to their employment, business prospects or social acceptance if they speak up and are seen as being trouble makers, unconventional or damaging to certain vested interests.
Their only recourse is to use nom de plumes, or remain completely silent.


Torrent of toxic Facebook posts after Mall melee
Russell Guy (Posted below on July 14, 2018 at 2:07 pm), as you and Sue Fielding (Posted below on July 14, 2018 at 8:46 am) both posit, “generational trauma, racism, alcohol abuse and domestic violence [are] some of the reasons for anti-social behavior among the young people responsible [for much crime and disturbance in our town]”.
What you and many others fail to recognise is that Chief Minister Michael Gunner, Territory Families Minister Dale Wakefield, and most other NT Cabinet members share this analysis. They are collectively taking serious steps to address these problems as quickly as possible.
They are doing this via several important measures, including by working in partnerships with Aboriginal community groups, organisations and remote communities to establish and support new out of home care and rehabilitation services; designing and building new therapeutic and educational rehabilitation institutions; as well as by assisting Alice Springs and other regional centres to develop positive directions and strategies.
As you observe, “Anger and frustration are two of the motivational issues, [as well as] mindless vandalism, which is existential for many kids”. However, anger, frustration and mindless vandalism, when permitted to flourish during the child’s development phases, can themselves become a driving habitual mode of operation and subconscious rationale for living.
These ingrained compulsions may be so strong that they become a huge obstacle to rehabilitation, and a powerful force undermining workers’ attempts to undertake generalised prevention strategies and early interventions with other young people who may be shaping up to replicate the patterns set by the dominant role models in their peer groups.
It is ignorant and patronising to suggest that [the politicians] are not completely aware of the need for investing “in healing, strengthening and skilling up young people”, and that they are not committed to achieving this as soon as possible.
The Chief Minister is providing strong support for both a national Aboriginal art gallery, and a national Indigenous cultural centre, in Alice Springs. He is also funding extra development of regional art centre facilities and staff accommodation in remote communities to help attract international tourists to spend time in Central Australia.
He is doing this to help provide direction for the town and region, responding to the requests by Indigenous leaders over many years.
His vision will extend the tourist season to year round activities, as these facilities will be air-conditioned and enable comfortable extended holiday breaks for Asian, European and North American visitors during the northern winter.
Trevor Shiell has some fine ideas, but he fails to see that the art gallery needs to be at the heart of the town, where it will maximise involvement not only of tourists, but also of townspeople on a daily basis, particularly local Aboriginal people, via jobs, training, social and cultural activities, and family events. A place to be very proud of, in a town that is providing futures for our youth, including Aboriginal youth.


Turn rock-throwing into backflips: how community can help
Nice exposition Rainer. Some very useful ideas and analysis there.
However, in relation to your advocacy for volunteer based programmes, such as on bus runs, night patrols or supervision of activities: I believe that it would be a grave error to make assumptions about the practicalities of these proposals.
Recent experience indicates that Alice does not have a reliable supply of such volunteers.
The midnight basketball came a cropper a few years back because of this factor.
The Uniting Church’s Meeting Place is not open very often for the same reason.
All the main existing youth spaces have appealed for volunteers at times, without much response.
A proposal to run Saturday night football for youth during the last Christmas holiday period failed for the same reason.
If a bus run or patrol is to operate through the night, I believe that it must be staffed by professionally trained, paid workers.
On the buses, a small core section of the client group are not easy to handle, even for the best professionals. Playing mind games with the driver becomes an integral part of their night’s fun. Chopping and changing explanations about what their problems and needs are, contradictory requests about where to go, and, in some cases, manufacturing reasons for not going being able to go home, are all part of the challenging behaviours displayed by some of the very alienated clients.
Threatening drivers and other staff may be a regular way for some to get extra attention. These rebellions sometimes become contagious within the cohort.
Your point about the need to employ workers who are fully cognizant of trauma informed theory and practice is, I believe, extremely relevant in this type of work.
For some young people, simply staying up all night and on the streets is their major act of defiance. They get a sense of achievement and success in their rebellion, including strong peer recognition, by this simple act.
The Department of Children and Families’ old YSOS unit (Youth Street Outreach Service) was very effective in dealing with these young people and their very difficult habits, before it was so tragically shut down by the Robyn Lambley/Terry Mills/Adam Giles budget cuts of 2012/13.
At the time, Giles said this service was no longer needed, because it was not dealing with a lot of clients.
Predictably, after its disbanding, problems associated with youth out at night rose inexorably, until things returned to the levels that had been occurring ten years ago, just before the YSOS was started.
It would now be very useful to find the people who worked on the YSOS, and get their views about what worked and why.


The millions and the misery
Jones (Posted June 10, 2018 at 12:46 pm), you display an unreasonably negative and incorrigibly antagonistic attitude towards the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and its considerable achievements in the health field.
You may have heard the old adage that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing? This certainly applies to you. You continually use your ignorance as a cloak for confidently, and very unfairly, maligning Congress.
For your information:
1. The primary causes of most renal disease are very long term, and are mainly associated with poverty. The impacts of the chronic stresses from living in poverty begin in utero, then early childhood, with kidney stones and infections much more common. The stress burdens and infections contribute to weaknesses in organs such as the kidneys. These experiences are all imprinted on a person in ways that may lead to renal disease in later life, irrespective of what health service a person attends. As already discussed, a great deal of the global obesity / diabetes epidemic is socially determined, and health services can only do so much on their own.
2. The rate of end stage renal failure requiring dialysis amongst Congress’s own long term resident clients is vastly less than the rate in the rest of remote central Australian Aboriginal communities. The rate in remote areas is generally more than eight times greater than the town. If you are going to use data, you should use it correctly.
3. There is no basis for your statement that “the [overall] incidence of this terminal disease [i.e. renal failure] is a good measure of the success or failure of diabetes programs for which Congress has responsibility”. The situation is much more complex, as explained above, and health services can only do so much.
4. In light of the above facts, there is no validity in your statement that “the incidence of end stage [renal] disease is out of control despite the tens of millions of funding provided to Congress.” Rather, it would appear that Congress’s funded programmes have contributed to the rate of end stage renal disease being much lower in the long term Alice Springs Aboriginal population than it would have been without those programmes.
Jonesy, it is now incumbent upon you to relinquish your pathological denial of Congress’s achievements, and “agree that Congress has long been a leader and good practitioner in prevention and early intervention strategies and practices.”


The millions and the misery
Yes Evelyne Roullet, I have heard of HTLV-1. It would be hard to not have, given the recent publicity.
But no, I don’t know how much Congress, or anybody else, contributes for research and cure of it.


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