@1. “I’ve been advocating the untried, yet proven take-away alcohol …

Comment on Last meeting of 11th Council descends into chaos by Ray.

@1. “I’ve been advocating the untried, yet proven take-away alcohol sales free day/s restriction.”
How can something that is untried, be proven? There have been many, many trials, new restrictions, reductions in hours, limitations on types of alcohol that can be purchased etc.
Bottom line is we have a large group of people who have no purpose in life, no goals, no obligations, and alcohol is the easiest drug to get hold of to ease the pain and hopelessness. The simple solution is not just to show your ID to buy grog, but to show a current pay slip. But then again, there is really no simple solution. If restrictions work, how come we see an increase in anti-social behaviour that involves alcohol despite more and more people on the banned drinkers register. This is why crime levels are increasing, because they cannot buy it, so they steal it. I see the Town and Country Tavern was hit again on Tuesday night. This town and the Mall could be a foodies paradise like Mitchell Street, vibrant and alive, but who would open an eatery just to have it smashed every night?

Recent Comments by Ray

Booze report: What the government is likely to do.
One of the issues I saw Mr Gunner speaking about was community clubs, whereby they can decide upon their alcohol policy dependent on what that community wants.
However, I do not remember exactly what was said. At first I thought he was talking about local clubs like the golf club, Gillen, Club eastside etc.
I gave it more thought and realized he was probably alluding to “wet canteens” on communities.
This would be worthwhile looking into Erwin, as it seems to one of the recommendations that have slipped under the radar.
If there is an opportunity for remote communities to sell alcohol, there could well be a reduction in road deaths, but also a massive increase in domestic violence.
How would that effect finding staff such as nurses, teachers, police etc for these communities?
I may have simply misheard what the CM said, but if I am correct, this could be a massive can of worms.


When NT was officially ‘a country for the White Man’
Ted is a marvellous ambassador for the NT, and a compelling author, and in the context of this article, it is explained well how the White Australia Policy influenced the selection and appointment of the ruling class, elected leaders or members of the establishment.
At first glance however, it is easy to see how people are confusing the White Australia Policy with policy applying to Aboriginal people.
There was never an actual white Australia Policy, rather it was an ideal, and a way of thinking that was common in that era, however it was primarily directed towards immigration, in that we should only accept immigration from Anglo-Saxon countries, not Asians, or other non-white backgrounds.
This is easy to see in the article above, however looking at posts in facebook and general conversation, it seems many, particularly the younger generation seem to believe in some myths in the history of our country are built on misinformation, or partial truths.
An example of this is the ongoing myth that Aborigines were treated as flora or fauna up until 1967, or that was the first time they were given the vote at that time.
In an era when we should be looking at accepting a few home truths on our way to reconciliation, we need to ensure that these untruths are corrected as well. Looking forward to Ted’s book.


On youth prisons: grandmothers, reformers, revolutionaries
@ Jameel: I really hope you are being sarcastic when you say “who are they?”
Do I really need to explain that “they” are the grandmothers that are calling for these young ones to go out bush, learn their ways and culture and be removed from town instead of being locked up. This used to be done in the 70s, when the young ones were going off the rails, they were sent to family on out stations, where they learnt their “cultural responsibilities”.
Unfortunately all these solutions are suggested when it is too late.
Only after the kids have robbed, stolen, destroyed, harassed, broken etc, and they have been to court, and sent to detention as a last resort to these so called concerned grandmothers shake their heads about what would be best for the kids.
Surely if they had these concerns, they would have sent the kids out bush when they first started getting into trouble.
With such a strong and close family bond, these grandmothers know what the kids are up to, and they certainly have family who live out bush who could take these kids for a while, like used to happen.
Unfortunately these family structures have broken down, and it is now easier to blame everybody else for their woes, because they can no longer control their own kids appalling behavior, lack of respect and willingness to use violence.


On youth prisons: grandmothers, reformers, revolutionaries
With 51% of the NT being Aboriginal land, why are they not doing this?


Helping offenders on probation and parole stay out of gaol
Wow, can anything be done these days without a fancy sounding acronym? It seems other programs have Frustrated All Involved Leading to Extended Discussions (FAILED), so let’s hope this is not just a load of Creative Repeating of yet Another Program (CRAP).


Be Sociable, Share!