Janet @ July 23rd. 9″ 02AM. You confuse Native Title …

Comment on Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon by Russell Guy.

Janet @ July 23rd. 9″ 02AM. You confuse Native Title with “Paternalism”. The poor health statistics associated with Indigenous peoples in relation to the rest of the population are directly related to long-term psychological stress incurred with “equality under the law” and the demise of cultural difference, centered around a relationship to the land which was allowed to co-exist on cattle stations before Equal Rights forced them into welfare.
Entwined with this is recognition by many Indigenous women that alcohol supply laws in the NT are injurious to their health and that of their children.
You hide behind the law with your Law and Order solution for alcohol-abuse and have failed to answer a question I put to you recently in these posts in relation to the growing evidence that Australia has a problem with alcohol-related violence.
Southern states are restricting supply access, but you are politically aligned with the NT Country Liberals whose policy is to deny that alcohol supply is a problem. I asked if you’d reviewed your paternalistic position.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon
You make some good points, Paul. I checked out that link and read Alison Andersen’s account of her childhood at Papunya prior to the 1970s “when things started going backwards.”
It’s interesting to compare her comments in the article by Kieran with her approbation of the missionaries and later in Christian-based schools like Yirara, St Phillips and Kormilda.
It was around that time that governments began returning Mission control to local Aboriginal Councils and many missionaries left, with some being asked to leave. Wet canteens came in at the same time.
My book on the Daintree Aboriginal Mission, BAPTISED AMONG CROCODILES 1940-1962 (1999) formed the core of my post-graduate thesis and study of Christian Missions to Aboriginal people.
Alison’s comments are largely similar to what I discovered was the general case, though, of course, much depended on the personality of the missionaries and there were mistakes, acknowledged or not. There are many books published on the subject which was overall a positive experience and is, to this day, a learning curve for those missionaries who are still in the field, but rewarding for both parties if the right balance is struck.
The old virtues of tolerance, acceptance, understanding, love for and compassion seem to be as fashionable as they were then.
As Alison says, “Where to from here?” When you consider how polarised are the alcohol-policies of the two political parties in the forthcoming NT election and the amount of material written about grog-abuse in the Alice Springs News Online alone during the past six months, you’ve got to wonder.


Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon
Paul Parker @ 24 July. 11: 59PM. Your comment relating to “‘hunter-gatherer’, ‘post-cultivator’ and ‘post-indsutrialized’ modern suburban cultures” leaves it up in the clear air over Alice Springs without qualifying it as to what may be done.
Your comment regarding “Welfare / Centrelink / Rights” follows-on with a correct understanding that most (Indigenous) recipients do not fully understand the Centrelink agreements that they are required to sign.
I suggest that this is more to do with their different cultural and educational background, often where English is not a first language, than the present urgent need for Centrelink to reform its programs with a focus on job creation outcomes.
As for your take on the history of the cattle station and Equal Rights process during the 1970s, I suggest you do a little reading of books written by those NT cattlemen involved, e.g., DRY RIVER (Rachel Percy. 2012. Hesperian Press. W.A.), the latest in a long line of such anecdotal evidence.
Finally, your comments on alcohol seem to agree that “alcohol supply laws relate to over-consumption”. I rest my case. Still waiting for a reply, Janet.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Indigenous gallery location done and dusted, says Lambley
@ Trevor Shiell. Posted 22nd June. 4:24pm.
The Stockman’s Hall of Fame and the Qantas Founder’s Museum in Longreach are kilometres from the CBD, but the Town Council has had to build an additional caravan park on the river because, in peak season, the others are full.
The new dinosaur park in Winton is out of town.
Probably because they build the town in the wrong place back then.
If only they’d known.
Some people have been calling for a Town Plan in Alice for years, but have given the game away and it’s easy to see why.
Even you have expressed this Yirara idea several times.
Ever get the feeling you’re a cracked record?
Actually, ‘blessed are the cracked for they shall let in a little light.’


Pine Gap’s new role as a war fighting command centre
Redundancy in the use of GPS technology, especially in relation to aviation and weather forecasting, is vital, but who knows how many satellites there are, which ones are kaput and which are fully functional for commercial or military purposes?
So many of us take satellite-based technology for granted in our daily lives, more especially as cyber warfare, recently exposed as influencing Australian elections, becomes a hot-button issue for the democratic world.
In those terms, Pine Gap is a significant asset, although, I note that Professor Blaxland is an academic from the ANU which recently rejected a fully-funded scholarship program for studies in Western Civilisation, while hosting similar programs from Asian and Islamic sources.


Cops nab alleged grog runners
@ Evelynne Roullet. Posted June 16th at 4: 37PM.
You acknowledge the connection between why so many kids are on the street and turning the tap down, but I wasn’t just referring to the meeting that you attended.
The philosophy behind the proposed THIS WAY youth centre, outlined in several posts, has made no mention of reducing the alcohol supply to the parents and families of these kids, despite my comment at the time that there is a connection.
As Rainer Chlanda has mentioned in his latest contribution to this debate, there were conflicting views at the meeting.
I don’t know if alcohol was mentioned, because I was unable to attend, but it seems to me that the philosophy so far espoused requires more input and that is why I have written about the harmful levels of consumption still practised and the liberal supply of alcohol still available in Alice Springs.
Surely, enabling the kids to return to a safe home, if they have one, in which alcohol dependency is mediated by turning the tap down, should be part of the equation.
You imply that it would have been off-subject and boycotted.
The continuing head in the sand denial of liberal supply is counter-productive to solving youth issues in a family-related way.
There needs to be a continuing debate about the flow of alcohol in town.
If you sow the wind, you reap the whirlwind.
The NT has the highest rate of alcohol consumption per capita than any other state in Australia.
The Gunner Government has begun the reform.
My point is that it needs to go further and that community action, such as the meeting set up by the organisers of THIS WAY, should publically declare direction for government reform.
No Sunday take-away would be a useful place to turn the tap down for the many reasons enumerated over many years, not least the huge saving to government and a more co-ordinated approach recommended by Rainer Chlanda.


Cops nab alleged grog runners
@ Ted Egan. Posted June 15 at 11:19am:
I think you know the answer to that one, Ted.
Since 1986 when Justice Muirhead proposed that glass flagons be withdrawn, due to their being a lethal weapon in alcohol-related fights, the packaging has changed and we have plastic bottles.
In the apocalyptic world of a shrill society that is being destroyed by the commercialisation of alcohol, there are proposed variations to takeaway supply for Tennant Creek and the Barkly: 4-7 for Tennant Creeks and the wider Barkly 12-7 Monday to Saturday. No Sunday trading.
The Licensing Commission proposes that the sale of the following products will be limited to no more than one of the following per person per day:
• 18 cans or stubbies of light beer (not more than 2.7% alcohol by volume); or
• 12 cans or stubbies of mid-strength beer (not more than 3.5% alcohol by volume); or
• 6 cans or stubbies of cider or full strength beer; or
• 6 cans or bottles of Ready to Drink mixes; or
• One bottle of fortified wine; or
• One bottle of green ginger wine; or
• Two x 750 ml bottles of wine; or
• One 750 ml bottle of spirits, unless one such bottle has been purchased in the past 24 hours.
Any person of age who is not on the Banned Drinkers Register can purchase that amount of grog six days a week.
A similar situation exists in Alice Springs seven days a week, with a floor price of $1.50 per standard drink.
The Gunner Government was looking at buying back takeaway alcohol licences from the critical mass of outlets in the Alice Springs CBD, but I’ve not heard any success of late.
At least it reveals an admission that the policy of the past fifty years of liberal supply has been disastrous.
I knew two young Aboriginal men, among others, Colin Proud and Ivan Dixon when I worked at CAAMA in the early 80s whose lives were destroyed by alcohol.
There have been thousands since.
Colin was a teetotaller, but the destruction of his world was too much to bear. Ivan passed away, also in his 30s, from cirrhosis of the liver. They would have been in their 60s now and good friends, I’m sure.
The sale of grog by Aboriginal-owned outlets and secondary supply by Aboriginal people is a fact of life.
The latter is vice, the former is unfortunate. The net result is the same.
It would still destroy people like Colin who lost hope in the apocalyptic world of a shrill society.
We haven’t come a long way from the Yuendemu flagon wagon. The government drives it around the track while people look on like a sport in the colosseum.
They probably think it’s politically naive to do much more or maybe, given the consultation over the Art Gallery, it’s what the people want.
The proposal for a 24/7 Youth Centre has no mention of turning the tap down.
The Gunner Government rejected limiting seven days a week takeaway in the NT as recommended by Justice Riley, but maybe we should be encouraged that they have proposed no Sunday in the Barkly and reinstated the BDR. It seems to have bipartisan support.
Perhaps, Colin may have been encouraged and gone on the BDR.


Cemeteries could be turned into parks
I endorse Domenico and Hal’s comments below, although a lot of epitaphs on sandstone are being erased by time and wind.
Some are evidence of a more Christian society one hundred years ago, others are philosophical.
It’s interesting and reflective to wander through the older section of our cemeteries; to maintain, rather than deny present and future generations of historians.


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