Janet @ July 23rd. 9″ 02AM. You confuse Native Title …

Comment on Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon by Russell Guy.

Janet @ July 23rd. 9″ 02AM. You confuse Native Title with “Paternalism”. The poor health statistics associated with Indigenous peoples in relation to the rest of the population are directly related to long-term psychological stress incurred with “equality under the law” and the demise of cultural difference, centered around a relationship to the land which was allowed to co-exist on cattle stations before Equal Rights forced them into welfare.
Entwined with this is recognition by many Indigenous women that alcohol supply laws in the NT are injurious to their health and that of their children.
You hide behind the law with your Law and Order solution for alcohol-abuse and have failed to answer a question I put to you recently in these posts in relation to the growing evidence that Australia has a problem with alcohol-related violence.
Southern states are restricting supply access, but you are politically aligned with the NT Country Liberals whose policy is to deny that alcohol supply is a problem. I asked if you’d reviewed your paternalistic position.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon
You make some good points, Paul. I checked out that link and read Alison Andersen’s account of her childhood at Papunya prior to the 1970s “when things started going backwards.”
It’s interesting to compare her comments in the article by Kieran with her approbation of the missionaries and later in Christian-based schools like Yirara, St Phillips and Kormilda.
It was around that time that governments began returning Mission control to local Aboriginal Councils and many missionaries left, with some being asked to leave. Wet canteens came in at the same time.
My book on the Daintree Aboriginal Mission, BAPTISED AMONG CROCODILES 1940-1962 (1999) formed the core of my post-graduate thesis and study of Christian Missions to Aboriginal people.
Alison’s comments are largely similar to what I discovered was the general case, though, of course, much depended on the personality of the missionaries and there were mistakes, acknowledged or not. There are many books published on the subject which was overall a positive experience and is, to this day, a learning curve for those missionaries who are still in the field, but rewarding for both parties if the right balance is struck.
The old virtues of tolerance, acceptance, understanding, love for and compassion seem to be as fashionable as they were then.
As Alison says, “Where to from here?” When you consider how polarised are the alcohol-policies of the two political parties in the forthcoming NT election and the amount of material written about grog-abuse in the Alice Springs News Online alone during the past six months, you’ve got to wonder.


Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon
Paul Parker @ 24 July. 11: 59PM. Your comment relating to “‘hunter-gatherer’, ‘post-cultivator’ and ‘post-indsutrialized’ modern suburban cultures” leaves it up in the clear air over Alice Springs without qualifying it as to what may be done.
Your comment regarding “Welfare / Centrelink / Rights” follows-on with a correct understanding that most (Indigenous) recipients do not fully understand the Centrelink agreements that they are required to sign.
I suggest that this is more to do with their different cultural and educational background, often where English is not a first language, than the present urgent need for Centrelink to reform its programs with a focus on job creation outcomes.
As for your take on the history of the cattle station and Equal Rights process during the 1970s, I suggest you do a little reading of books written by those NT cattlemen involved, e.g., DRY RIVER (Rachel Percy. 2012. Hesperian Press. W.A.), the latest in a long line of such anecdotal evidence.
Finally, your comments on alcohol seem to agree that “alcohol supply laws relate to over-consumption”. I rest my case. Still waiting for a reply, Janet.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

NT-SA agreement hardly historic
Paul Keating, in his 1992 Redfern Speech, framed by speechwriter Don Watson, author of the somewhat dryly punitive opus, The Bush, also claimed a historic mandate, announcing success for Reconciliation “within the next decade.”
It’s in the nature of politics to claim credit for doing something, mostly spending tax revenue and living in hope that it won’t run out.
In my opinion, the “historic” issue is just a beat up or a sop.
Pass me another piece of Bicenttennial birthday cake, please.


Greens on Pine Gap: Move towards non-aligned foreign policy
The Greens, once declared an “alternative” political party, inherited the structural social and cultural goalposts, but they keep trying to kick goals through them.
Kinselas’s, one of Sydney’s long established pubs, was recently sold through the Sunsuper-backed Australian Pub Fund for $22m.
It was purchased in 2010 for $10m, but it’s been said that it would have gone for $40m had the NSW government’s lock-out laws not been enacted.
Senator Di Natale obviously supports other supply-reduction measures, but dealing with the structural wealth of Super funds and their investment in the alcohol industry is a bit more difficult than continuing to bang the party political donation route to government corruption.
It would be nice if politicians who eschew liberal social policy when it suits them, could tackle financial regulation through institutionalised investment in the alcohol industry.


They must be joking!
@ Charlie Carter. Sense is subjective. Some people laugh when others don’t and vice versa. Cheers.


They must be joking!
From reading these comments over a number of years, there are a lot of disgruntled people who have moved to Alice Springs in recent times, who appear to want the place to conform to their aspirations.
They talk about “remote” and “communities” in the abstract.
They have no idea of Mbantua.
They want what they think life should offer, according to what they read in the glossy inserts or la dolce vita on television.
When the lights go out and it’s time to cook dinner on an open fire, what then, ye dreaming?


What the open letter didn’t say
End-of-day performances by the many local musicians, occurring in the Mall is a great idea for so many obvious reasons.
I did this numerous times in the 1980s with musos and it’s not that difficult with a small PA system.
It creates paid work and gives a sense of cultural belonging that cannot really be created by other art forms.
Music speaks all languages. We had occasional problems with intoxicated persons, but violence was extremely rare.
I urge the council to look at this again, especially where inner-city gentrification is forcing musicians out and replacing “live” entertainment with grog shanties. Goodness, people might start dancing again.


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