Eli you say that creating open space is good, but …

Comment on Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain by Fred.

Eli you say that creating open space is good, but query how I would justify paying millions for buildings from private land owners to create this open space.
If open space is good why have you been supporting a development that destroys the best open space in the mall?
The most positive experience of Aboriginal people and culture many tourists get is through the painting sales on the Mall open space.
For many that is the sum total of their experience of another culture they have come half way around the world to meet.
I see positive interaction on the open space all the time.
Open space on the Mall is overdue to be revalued as a cultural meeting place for local Aboriginal people and tourists.
It is a tourist drawcard.
That’s how I would justify paying millions from the $30m the Council has to create more open space.

Fred Also Commented

Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
Eli You say that if the Polynesians can put on a cultural show, why cant we?
Well the cultural centre is far less ambitious that the spectacular Polynesian show.
So how’s it going?
Are you and the other members of council moving ahead with it?
Absolutely not from what I can see.
So why are you promoting an ambitious cultural show when, along with our other representatives, you can’t facilitate a cultural centre?
Stumbling with the baby steps while talking about running a marathon?
Running with an ambitious development while basic services are poor and very expensive?
Drifting away from the boring core functions of a council to run a political agenda?

Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
Eli, It worries me that our council does not appear to be operating in the real world of Alice Springs
The local reaction to the development you have supported clearly demonstrates that.
Similarly your idea of a Polynesian cultural centre as in Hawaii is not going to happen here and frankly is absurd in our context.
One could write a book on the reasons for that.
So we need practical development that is based on our town and we need representatives with a firm and complete grasp of the local realities and sentiments.

Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
This proposal is ghastly, inappropriate and destroys the best part of the Mall.
It comes close on the heels of the monstrous law and order edifice, the new supreme court building.
Spend the $30m to control rate increases and to unwind development to bring some of our town’s soul back.
Perhaps acquire buildings near the mall to be demolished and turned into open space.
The new proposal should be put on hold until the next council election.
That way ratepayers will get a chance to vote according to the candidates’ disposition towards it.
It is a worry that our council appears to be chronically incapable of coming up with development concepts that enhance the livability of our town.

Recent Comments by Fred

‘Bring back school based constables’
@ Phil Walcott: What a joke restorative justice programs have been in the Territory. They actually undid the good work of school cops.
At Alice Springs Highschool there was a spate of racist behaviour allegedly perpetrated by white kids on Aboriginal students.
Oddly the Aboriginal students were often a lot bigger, tougher and ganged up.
At the restorative meetings the white kids would readily confess their offence and apologise profusely.
They would accept any consequence for their poor behaviour without any complaint.
In reality, the racist accusation was a weapon expertly used against targeted white students who often attended the school in fear of assault.
In any restorative situation where the participants rather than the school decide who is in the wrong the power relationship will prevail.
That relationship invariable favoured the Aboriginal students.
One outcome was Aboriginal youth who thought they could always manipulate the system.
Many ended up in jail.
The other outcome was successive generations of racist white adults, they never forgot.

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Hi Erwin, I wouldn’t bother asking this of many journalists because I doubt they would, but would you go to jail to protect a source?
[Yes. To protect the source’s identity.]

Offenders bailed to ‘country’: An option, says police
David, it’s not just Lhere Artepe selling grog but other major Aboriginal groups in town have also tried to make money out of selling grog.
The Memo Club was funded by CentreCorp and behind that was the Central Land Council and Congress.
Yes Congress, recipient of $40m a year from taxpayers to improve Aboriginal health was on the CentreCorp Board that supported grog sales, mostly to Aboriginal people.

Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
Local 1: I wouldn’t use the criterion of Aboriginal or non Aboriginal ownership in deciding which outlets should be closed down.
That seems irrelevant.
I would look at the proximity of outlets to tourists and their ability to cater to increased numbers of drinkers once the total number of outlets is reduced.
The NT Police would have an important say in the decision.
Basically, we need fewer outlets and ones that lend themselves to intensive ongoing policing.
The savings to the NT Government in the long term from having fewer outlets to police would be considerable.

Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
What will it cost to police each alcohol outlet for a decade? $4m?
They must be policed so what we need to do is to reduce the number of outlets.
The NT Government should buy out a couple of the current licences.
Yes, expensive, but $8m saved in a decade with other benefits as well.
Outlets that contribute to the most social disruption and damage to the Territory’s reputation with tourists should be the ones to go.

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