I disagree with the statement these trees are being lost …

Comment on Save our trees: reduce Buffel, call 000, collaborate by Ray.

I disagree with the statement these trees are being lost to wildfires.
These fires are normally deliberately lit, which makes them a result of a lack of respect, vandalism or arson.
There are fines under the Fire Act / Criminal Code or some such legislation that covers the lighting of bushes or trees.
Have these provisions ever been used? A lot of the time these are comfort fires lit by illegal campers. Move them out, save some trees.

Ray Also Commented

Save our trees: reduce Buffel, call 000, collaborate
I wrote to a council hopeful just recently, expressing my ideas about the river. I lived in Bundaberg, and Brisbane for many years, both cities/towns that have a river running through them. Both of these towns treated the river as just a part of life, just being there, for many years. It is only in the last 20 – 30 years that these towns really embraced the river. They looked after the banks, they cleaned them up and stopped using them as a dumping ground and beautified them. Now, as a result, they are a focal point for the community, festivals, and lifestyles. Some detractors might say, there is a big difference, the Todd River is dry. I have lived here long enough to understand the Territory attitude, and by my interpretation of that, the response would be why should a lack of water stop us.
I remember attending the Alice in 10 meetings and remember the aerial photos identifying the sacred trees, as defined by the TOs. The idea was that whatever work was done, those trees would be protected.
We have a world renowned feature here in the centre of our town. The area used for the Henly-on-Todd looks beautiful because it is used for something and it receives attention. The rest of it looks like an unkempt, untidy backyard of an abandoned house.
Cleaning it up and using the “dredged” sand to build up levee banks could mitigate the flood risk, removing the choking buffel and new, non-sacred trees further down would free up the flow, allowing peak water heights to be reduced, allowing the land adjacent to the river to be used for a multitude of activities. Preventing the restrictions down stream could protect any infrastructure that was put in place.
With well thought out manicuring of these banks, it could be a beautiful public space we all could enjoy. I remember in my recent WA holiday, seeing a couple of towns that had massive skate parks, beautifully manicured and maintained, that were on display for all, and integrated into the towns’ open spaces. Families were there enjoying BBQs whilst the kids enjoyed skate boarding. It was not in some out of the way, fenced off dimly lit area, where most kids were afraid to go. I expect responses to this to explain all the reasons it won’t work, I would rather hear how it could.


Recent Comments by Ray

Because of eight grandmothers we can
Would be good if this passionate grandmothers group actually taught their own children how to effectively parent their kids.
Then the government and NGOs would not need to be involved at all.
Teach and be responsible for the lives of your own children, all the way down the line. If they need time out bush, take them, 51% of the NT is Aboriginal land.
You have the power, you have the ability, find the will to do it, then these kids will avoid the criminal justice system altogether.
Walk the streets with the concerned citizens and take responsibility.


Torrent of toxic Facebook posts after Mall melee
Rosalie, we should all be concerned about these posts, but why are they racist? They very accurately describe the problem. As the article says, there is concern that 100% of the inmates in the detention center are Aboriginal, all of the kids in the mall rampage are Aboriginal. Unless we are prepared to call the issue for what it is, we are blindsiding ourselves to acknowledging what the real problem is.
Unfortunately, it has a flow-on effect to all the wonderful hard working Aboriginal people in town who keep their kids at home and send their kids to school. That is the norm.
Unfortunately, unless we identify the issue it cannot be addressed.
It’s like a farmer calling a meeting and talking about the dingo killing his newborn calves, then a greenie pipes up and says “hang on, not all dingoes are responsible”.
The farmer says OK, “a type of dog is causing problems”, once again, “you can’t blame all the dogs for the actions of the few”.
The meeting is called and the farmer explains that some type of animal is killing his livestock. “What kind of animal do we need to control,” says the decision maker.
Poor old farmer can’t be specific lest he is labeled racist. Decision maker says we can’t do anything because there is no evidence of what the farmer says. Decision maker goes away, the farmer goes broke. The end.


Will more consultants get tourism out of the mire?
Of course, the best way to get tourists here is to stop the ones that have come before, talking about the violence, humbugging, theft, assault and the sad sight of people hanging around doing … nothing. Oh except fighting near the bottleshops, in the mall, in parklands. People come here to see Aboriginal culture, what they see is anything but.
This is the image and experience that people are taking away with them, and from the papers. Darwin is the same.
It does not need a consultant, it needs a government prepared to ignore the greenies and apologists, and actually fix the problem.
It may have the added bonus of getting people to actually enjoy living here, not making plans on how and when to leave. The population of the Alice Springs local government area has dropped by almost 3500 people since 2007. That is a rather large exodus.
What plans do the governments (all levels) have to bring industry, employment, and growth to the area?
All we have seen recently is the folding of private enterprise and an increase in service and Aboriginal support agencies. We have the largest renal dialysis facility in the southern hemisphere, but that is not the sort of things to bring the tourists flooding back.
Fix these problems, and you will also fix the downturn in tourism.
Where is my consultancy fee?


Keeping youth in sight
Hi Rainer, I was going to jump straight in and have a go about the comment of youth yearning to be “heard, seen and acknowledged by adults”. I heard this on the radio and was pretty amused, so I jumped on the site and actually read your article first before flying off the handle. Also my respect for your dad and your youth means I will try and keep things toned down.
Most adults over the age of 40 were probably raised at the tail end of the era where the mantra of kids being seen and not heard was true. Basically that meant that people with life experience made the decisions, and until you lived a little you need to listen and learn before having the right to have an opinion. This was true in all civilisations and cultures, where kids sat at tribal meetings, and listened to the elders, and did not have any input.
We have come a long way since then and kids really do have a chance to be heard, but like most things in an ordered society, there are ways and means of doing these things. They will not have the respect of adults until they earn it it. They cannot change the natural order of things just because they want it changed.
They want respect? Get them to school, get them working part time jobs at Maccas or IGA or KFC. The biggest problem is not that the employer will not give them a chance, but family and peers who accuse them of being coconuts and trying to be like a white fella, that’s what we need to change.
They will get respect from adults when you can drive down Gap Road without them pretending to jump out in front of a car and trying to intimidate people. They will get respect when they go to school instead of calling into your office with energy to burn. They cannot and will not get any respect by essentially saying we do what we do because we just want you to respect us, that’s like a rapist saying he just wanted to be loved.
All the while our nightlife is dying because Alice residents live in fear of going out at night in case their car is rocked, or their house broken into by these kids when they are out. The same kids you speak to are the same ones that cause these issues, and the resentment towards them is justified because while they expect us to listen to them, they never listen to us. They steal our kids’ bikes that we work hard for, they egg our houses because we work hard for the nice things we have, they terrify the tourists who are the lifeblood of this town.
Your idea of a skate park near the CBD is great, and would be ideal along the banks of the Todd river, which is an under-utilised asset we have. The area between the Todd Tavern and the bridge would be ideal, and if it flooded, a skate park would just need to be hosed out after the water levels dropped. It could be floodlit and landscaped and yes, it would be a beautiful area for workers in the town to rest whilst enjoying their lunch break.
But these kids think it is fun to intimidate people. Unless that changes, it is hard to see the full potential and funding to achieve that vision ever being realised.
When these kids come streaming into your office, do you offer to assist them into getting into and staying in school? Could there be funding for homework centres for these kids to go to? Could your office be relocated to the entrance to the new skatepark where kids could be fed at night and a cafe set up where these bored kids could be taught how to run a canteen and have pride in their own place?
This could all be done in return for respecting the community, after all the money that is spent on any new skatepark will come from the adults who pay council rates. Respect is a two way street. Unfortunately this is unlikely as the sorts of kids we are dealing with do not like a presciptve form of entertainment. Anything that is too organised they rebel against, hence the game of getting chased by coppers is more valued by them than any sort of skatepark. Keep up the good writing.


Government backflips on alcohol floor price: Lambley
Just looked at the number of 24hr bottle shops in Melbourne from as far north as Preston and south to St Kilda. There are 11.
Not counting 24 hour operators, there are over 170 in a similar area.
In Alice Springs, there are 10, although AA is actually listed as a takeaway bottle shop, so lets say 9. There is also home delivery of alcohol in Melbourne, so every house virtually has a bottle shop if they have a telephone.
Yet despite these figures, we are the ones with a sheer number of takeaway alcohol? I don’t think it is the number of outlets we have, nor is it the opening hours.
Maybe it is something else?


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