Mr La Flamme. Respectfully, your reference to my alleged “patronising …

Comment on Surprising conservative on council: Jacinta Price by John Bell.

Mr La Flamme. Respectfully, your reference to my alleged “patronising judgments” is misplaced. My comments were not intended to patronise. Far from it, in fact.
In some people’s eyes, Ms Finnane’s comment about “white men who find it hard to …” could be seen to be patronising … and quite judgmental. I accept that this is her view based on hard data.
“Patronising” is a powerfully emotive word. Can be applied to a wide spectrum.
I have found extreme patronisation towards the Aboriginal community in the platforms of white male and female activists in power. It now seems to go by the name of the “politics of low expectations”.
However, in the spirit of freedom of speech, I accept Ms Finnane’s slant on white men and their access to power as a valid view, expressed by a good journalist who does a due diligent job.
The point I was making is that it does not matter which gender or political interest group has access to power.
I think most of us have found that human nature has common traits and behavioural patterns in all groups, whether male or female, regardless of gender, colour, age or political leanings. You and me, for instance.
My comment was simply intended as a “caveat emptor” warning to the next group with access to power on council.
Unfettered access to power has a funny habit of bringing out the best and the worst in all of us.

John Bell Also Commented

Surprising conservative on council: Jacinta Price
Dear Ms Roullet. You are on! We could form a coalition, so to speak!

Surprising conservative on council: Jacinta Price
Miss Roullet. I do agree with you that human nature can be unpredictable, as an unfortunate French king found out.
However, here’s another saying – “history repeats itself” … and another … “there is nothing new under the sun”.
As the history of France and other republican nations subsequently has shown, in every type of government, whether governed by monarchs, presidents, dictators et al, similar naughty bits of human nature inevitably kick in. Power blocs form, regardless of whatever Right, Left, “conservative” or “progressive” regimes come to rule.
Fast forward to Alice Council 2017.
Bet you a seniors black coffee of your choice in Fan Arcade next time I see you, the next council will form a power bloc(s) of like-minded individuals with a born-to-rule mindset, whether high-minded idealists or scurvy small business wheeler dealers.
Betcha each bloc has the distinct potential, based on the facts of history, to be as bad or as good as the other?

Surprising conservative on council: Jacinta Price
Mr La Flamme. I agree that diversity is a wonderful concept. The more diversity, the better. In theory.
However, to get things done efficiently and on budget year after year, for the practical benefit of the community as a whole, there must be a majority council decision on its multitude of day to day operational priorities. Hum drum decisions but critical for a council to keep Alice humming along, looking good, keeping streets clean etc.
Human nature and common sense dictate that no two councillors agree on budget priorities all the time, and that’s why power blocs tend to form.
Diversity is honourable but a double-edged sword. Sooner or later, human nature kicks in.
Betcha a zillion dollars that a power bloc will form among the more forceful of the diverse councillors. To get things done. In their image.
Just like Ms Finnane has found.
Let’s hope that the new diversity power bloc of the future has the practical ability and the necessary business nouse to run the hum drum daily boring job of council efficiently, as well as the white man power bloc has done previously that Ms Finnane refers to.
But hey, let’s stop splitting hairs and wish all the council nominees all the very best in the interests of a better Alice.
And all the best to you, Mr La Flamme.

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