Gunner should ask the residents as the oval belongs to …

Comment on Gallery poll: less than 40% wanted Anzac Oval by Evelyne Roullet.

Gunner should ask the residents as the oval belongs to the ratepayers and not to the Mayor.
After six months of hard work, the committee handed its report to government in mid-November.
The committee believe that the Desert Park is the best location to achieve the project’s vision.
More than any other site considered, it would allow an expression of “connectedness to country,” says Mr Watkins – fundamental for an Indigenous cultural project.
“It’s somewhere where you can understand the grandeur, the majesty of the country, where the museum would have room to breathe,” says Ms Perkins.
Why have a committee if you do not listen to the founding? Is it not throwing money in the wind?

Evelyne Roullet Also Commented

Gallery poll: less than 40% wanted Anzac Oval
• 39% does not make a majority.
• The building is more than just an old high school to a lot of old residents including me! Community college, technical college …
• Tourism? I have been tour guide / sole operator for language and I have good knowledge of what the real tourists want. I said real, because you have tourists who do not know why they are here, and the ones who have specific wants.
• “We understand Anzac Oval is highly valued as community green space. This will be respected in the planning and design process for the gallery. The community, including traditional owners, will be consulted through this process.”
• Green will be respected? Please explain.
• In the planning and design process? Hello!!! No design yet!!!
• How can you consult without a design and projection???
This project looks more and more like a scenario of “Yes, Minister”.
Bernard: But surely the citizens of a democracy have a right to know.
Sir Humphrey Appleby: No. They have a right to be ignorant. Knowledge only means complicity in guilt; ignorance has a certain dignity.


Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

The stolen child who went to university
@ David, Posted February 11, 2019 at 11:00 pm: “We need to get some things straight here.
If policemen, holy men of the cloth, miners, pastoralist, vagabonds of the day, had kept their trousers buttoned up and not pursued Aboriginal women, there would not be a stolen generation, that is, children sired by non Aboriginal men as those described.”
Your comment underlines the fact that those children were part of two communities: Aboriginal and European.
I am in total agreement with you, it was a disgrace that those children were stolen from their mother; but in this period of history women of any skin colour did not have many rights.


Make September 8 Australia Day, anthem in Pitjantjatjara
Great ideas, Ted.


Planning another plan
I am in total agreement with Puesdo Guru.


Australia Day: Alice’s role in it
@ Alex: I think that unless we sit with all our different sources, we will never agree on this point, as even our government states that Cook claimed Australia.


Australia Day: Alice’s role in it
@ Local 1: you wrote :”Australia’s history really began when first claimed by Philip on the shores of Port Jackson, on January 26, 1788″.
I am a bit confused as I always believe, that is perhaps because of my French history, that Britain Lieutenant James Cook, captain of HMB Endeavour, claimed the eastern portion of the Australian continent for the British Crown in 1770, naming it New South Wales seeking to pre-empt the French colonial empire from expanding into the region.
Louis Antoine de Bougainville 1768 approached the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of North Queensland but was turned away by the surf.
You have to be thankful to the surf because without it you will be French and the 14th of July not the 9th would be our national day.
Britain chose Australia as the site of a penal colony.
But until Queen Victoria gave us our freedom, we were not a nation but a colony.
In my opinion, it is very strange and sad that we celebrate the landing of criminals and prostitutes as our beginning.
Many convicts were left struggling with unemployment, personal relationships, and alcoholism, and drifted through both life and the colony.
Many re-offended for decades after they were freed in Australia, but only committed low-level nuisance and public order offenses – mainly drunkenness and vagrancy – rather than the more serious crimes for which they were initially transported.


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