Ah, Edan, as tantalising as a scoop neckline at the …

Comment on Aboriginal gallery: rushed business case yet immediate start? by Hal Duell.

Ah, Edan, as tantalising as a scoop neckline at the Saturday dance.

Recent Comments by Hal Duell

Horses perish near Santa Teresa
@S teve Brown: If the dead horses were owned stock, then their owner got slack and has to bear full responsibility. No excuses. Suck it up.
On the other hand, if they were feral brumbies, then those brumbies’ luck just ran out.
I expect their story is being repeated out there this summer, and across many species, when 38 has become a cool change!
And as I suggested in an earlier post, this might just be the tip of an iceberg.
But your comment “Climate Change – my arse!” has me wondering. Are you saying that you do not think the global weather is warming?


Horses perish near Santa Teresa
“Usually reliable water hole ran dry …”
Expect more of this. And still we have those among us who deny the glaring reality of global warming.
The increasing ice melt in Greenland, the loss of ice in the Arctic and the same in Antarctica are all the result of warming weather.
“It’s just a natural cycle,” cry the denialists. As if that matters. Business as usual is no longer an option. We have to innovate and learn to cope with a changing world.
And on that subject, how much do all these senseless wars contribute to the hot water we find ourselves in.


Miners are spreading myths, says environmentalist
@ Alex: No, I do not understand the function and funding of the CLC.
What I do understand is that after how many years their client base still lives in squalor with little or no hope for a better life.
Why else do so many continue to come to town in despair? Why else do so many residents of remote communities complain of the perceived control and nepotism?
I suspect they (the CLC) are a self licking ice cream cone. Sorry, but there you have it.


Miners are spreading myths, says environmentalist
That was a good reply, Jimmy, and thank you.
I agree with you that the mining industries need to be regulated. There has to be an end to the old practice of extracting the resource, pocketing the profits and leaving the mess for others to deal with.
But whether we like it or not, some extracting needs to take place if we are to do more than sit under a pristine tree while waiting for others to bring us a daily bowl of rice.
So extract where possible under environmentally responsible regulations and ensure any resultant mess is dealt with adequately.
And then we come to the profits. Some of these really must be left behind, and not just to swell the coffers of the regulating agencies, whether they be the NT Government or bodies like the CLC. They must, as much as is possible, be left out on the lands to deal not just with the material poverty, but with the poverty of hope, the dearth of expectations.
Only then can the extraction industries be seen to be a force for the good and be worthy of our support.


Miners are spreading myths, says environmentalist
I have only recently become aware of these claimed diamond deposits. If there really are potential diamond mines in the NT, what is the rationale for not developing them?
I suggest that those such as Ken in this thread reapply.
There has been a change of guard in the CLC, so maybe they will stop just saying no.
And the NT itself is broke and going broker.
I share Jimmy’s worries about fracking.
But diamonds? And I do question his insistence on maintaining our “pristine” environment at the expense of all development.
There’s some pretty pristine poverty going on out there as well.


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